American Ballet Theatre OffStage: A 2020 Virtual Season, May 11 – July 4, 2020

“American Ballet Theatre (ABT) presents a full season of programming to viewers and fans around the world with American Ballet Theatre OffStage: A 2020 Virtual Season. As the global health crisis has forced ABT artists out of the theater and into their homes, these online offerings will carry the artistry of ABT into homes everywhere with a slate of daily activities timed to align with ABT’s previously planned New York 80th Anniversary Spring Season, May 11–July 4, 2020. 

In this week-by-week online journey, American Ballet Theatre OffStage offers diverse behind-the-scenes experiences of America’s National Ballet Company®. Daily programming includes conversations, ballet classes, orchestral concerts, Guest Artist spotlights, hair and make-up tutorials and a historical review. American Ballet Theatre OffStage will run across Company online platforms at ABT.org, Instagram (@ABTOfficial, @ABTSchool, and @ABTStudioCo), Facebook, YouTube, Twitter and email blasts.” ― ABT

For more information, please visit www.abt.org/TogetherTonight.

ABT 2020 Season

ABT 2020. Misty Copeland and Calvin Royal III. Photo: Ruth Hogben.

ABT 2020 Season

ABT dancers Hee Seo, Calvin Royal III, Christine Shevchenko, Aran Bell, Catherine Hurlin and Isabella Boylston. Photo: Osvaldo Pontón. Creative Direction: Ruth Hogben.

ABT 2020

ABT 2020. Isabella Boylston. Photo: Osvaldo Pontón. Creative Direction: Ruth Hogben

ABT 2020

ABT dancers Thomas Forster, Christine Shevchenko, Calvin Royal III, Hee Seo, Catherine Hurlin and Aran Bell. Photo: Osvaldo Pontón. Creative Direction: Ruth Hogben.

Images courtesy American Ballet Theatre.

Lincoln Center at Home, Dance Week, May 30 – June 4, 2020

Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts (LCPA) announces a week devoted to dance. Part of Lincoln Center at Home (#LincolnCenterAtHome), the offerings, which will be streamed at LincolnCenter.org and on Lincoln Center’s Facebook Page, were filmed during more than 40 years of performances on the Lincoln Center Campus by such renowned institutions as Ballet Hispánico, New York City Ballet, American Ballet Theatre, The School of American Ballet, and Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater.

  • Saturday May 30 at 2pm: CARMEN.maquia and Club HavanaBallet Hispánico
  • Saturday May 30 at 8pm: A Midsummer Night’s Dream, New York City Ballet
  • Sunday May 31 at 8pm: American Ballet Theatre at the Metropolitan Opera House
  • Monday June 1 at 7pm: The School of American Ballet Virtual Workshop Performance Celebration
  • Tuesday June 2 at 8pm: Coppélia, New York City Ballet
  • Wednesday June 3 at 8pm: Tribute to Balanchine, New York City Ballet
  • Thursday June 4 at 8pm: Chroma, Grace, Takademe, Revelations, Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater
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Ballet Hispanico in CARMEN.maquia

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New York City Ballet in A Midsummer Night’s Dream

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New York City Ballet in Tribute to George Balanchine

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American Ballet Theatre in Les Sylphides with with Rebecca Wright,
Marianna Tcherkassky and Ivan Nagy leading the cast. Photo by Louis Peres

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Advanced students of the School of American Ballet performing Scotch Symphony at the 2017 Workshop Performances. Choreography by George Balanchine © The George Balanchine Trust. Photo by Paul Kolnik

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Advanced students of the School of American Ballet performing In Creases at the 2018 Workshop Performances. Photo by Paul Kolnik

Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater in Alvin Ailey's Revelations. Photo by Bill Hebert (1)

Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater in Alvin Ailey’s Revelations. Photo by Bill Hebert

Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater in Ronald K. Brown's Grace. Photo by Pierre Wachholder

Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater in Ronald K. Brown’s Grace. Photo by Pierre Wachholder

Some of the broadcasts have not been seen in decades and are being unlocked as Lincoln Center offers gems from its media archives, including landmark New York City Ballet works by George Balanchine, the company’s co-founder, with some dancers in the roles that Balanchine created for them.

Title photo: David Geffen Hall. Photo by Iñaki Vinaixa for Lincoln Center.

Images courtesy Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts.

Socially Distant Theater: The Solo Show as Seen by Hirschfeld an Online Exhibition by The Al Hirschfeld Foundation, May 11 – June 20,2020

“The Al Hirschfeld Foundation is proud to announce the first in a series of online exhibitions exploring the work of one of the most iconic artists of the last century. On May 11, the Foundation will open a special exhibition for these times: ‘SOCIALLY DISTANT THEATER: The Solo Show as Seen by Hirschfeld’, a collection of 25 drawings, paintings, collages, and prints documenting a half century of one person shows. This special digital exhibit will be online for six weeks through June 20 at AlHirschfeldFoundation.org/exhibitions before a new exhibition is presented.

In addition to showing the artwork in detail as it has never been seen before, throughout the exhibition are links to videos of parts or the whole of some of these solo performances. You can see Henry Fonda as Clarence Darrow, Julie Harris as Emily Dickinson, or Robert Morse as Truman Capote. Or you can see Eric Bogosian, Whoopi Goldberg, and John Leguizamo channel a seemingly endless parade of characters from their solo shows. It turns out being alone has never been so interesting.” ― The Al Hirschfeld Foundation

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Socially Distant Theater: The Solo Show As Seen By Hirschfeld

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The first NINA: Are You With It, Rugged Path, and Girl From Nantucket, 1945

Lily Tomlin in Appearing Nitely 1977

Lily Tomlin in Appearing Nitely, 1977

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Whoopi Goldberg in Whoopi Goldberg, 1984

Mandy Patinkin in Mandy Patinkin Dress Casual 1989

Mandy Patinkin in Mandy Patinkin Dress Casual, 1989

Patrick Stewart in A Christmas Carol 1994

Patrick Stewart in A Christmas Carol, 1994

Christopher Plummer in Barrymore 1997

Christopher Plummer in Barrymore, 1997

John Leguizamo in Sexaholic A Love Story 2002

John Leguizamo in Sexaholic…A Love Story, 2002

Elaine Strich in At Liberty 2002

Elaine Strich in At Liberty, 2002

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Self Portrait, 1985

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Self Portrait in Barber Chair, 1989

“In the world of the theater, the one-person show is perhaps the best situation and the worst,” writes David Leopold, Creative Director for the AHF in the introduction to the exhibition. “It is a supreme test of assurance and ability; of magnetism and charisma. But the format is also frightening; there’s no one to play against, to lean on, to share the criticism. For an actor, if there is no one else to take the blame, there is also no one to share the credit with as well. The applause at the end is for only one performer. In many ways these performers are all caricatures in the sense they have exaggerated elements of their subject to bring a whole life or simply a story to life. So in essence, Al Hirschfeld, the ultimate solo artist, is the ideal portraitist for this unique form of theater.”

Images courtesy The Al Hirschfeld Foundation.

Francie Bishop Good: Curious Garden at Mindy Solomon Gallery, Miami, through May 31, 2020*

“I am sure there is Magic in everything, only we have not sense enough to get hold of it and make it do things for us” ― Frances Hodgson Burnett, The Secret Garden

“Francie Bishop Good makes gardens-subterranean, magical, tropical, extraterrestrial forms. She occasionally pairs them with paintings. Energetically swirling colors to complement and clash with the three-dimensional component. Her seemingly endless array of works blossom and grow from a long history of training and hard creative work.

Francie uses photography as a point of departure in her works, beginning with a digital image that is then covered with paint, ultimately hiding the initial subject. Hands on manipulation of clay and the ‘conversation’ between two-dimensional and three-dimensional forms painted with the same vibrant polymer palate result in something resoundingly fresh and different – a hard won victory in an art world full of derivation.

For her exhibition Curious Garden, Good activates individual sculptures and organically inspired pedestals as well as large-scale wall works to create a sense of the ‘vegetative’ in the gallery space.” ― Mindy Solomon Gallery

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The Dragons In Our Plants, 2020. Synthetic polymer paint on board, 40″ × 90″

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Front: Good Salmon Giant Pinch Pot, 2020. Resin, foam, cement, synthetic polymer paints, bisque-fired earthenware, metal stool, 50 x 36 x 36 in. Back: Remembering Daffs, 2020. Synthetic polymer paint on board, 48″ × 72″

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Installation view of Francie Bishop Good: Curious Garden

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Installation view of Francie Bishop Good: Curious Garden

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Installation view of Francie Bishop Good: Curious Garden

Mandrake, 2020 Pairing nting, 20 x 16 synthetic polymer paints on board Sculpture, 9x11x9 synthetic polymer paint on bisque fired earthenware copy

Good Mandrake, 2020. Synthetic polymer paints on board, bisque-fired earthenware clay with synthetic polymer paints. Painting 20″ x 16″. Sculpture 9″ x 11″ x 9″

Larkspur, pairing 2020 ainting, 18x24 synthetic Polymer paint on Board Sculpture, 10x9x9 synthetic Polymer paints on Bisque Fired Earthenware copy

Good Larkspur, 2020. Synthetic polymer paints on board, bisque-fired earthenware clay with synthetic polymer paints. Painting 20″ x 24″. Sculpture 10″ x 9″ x 9″

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Installation view of Francie Bishop Good: Curious Garden

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Good Moonflower, 2020. Synthetic polymer paints on board, bisque fired earthenware clay with synthetic polymer paints. Painting 18″ × 24″. Sculpture 7″ x 7″ x 6″

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Installation view of Francie Bishop Good: Curious Garden

Images courtesy Mindy Solomon Gallery.

*PLEASE NOTE: Mindy Solomon Gallery is temporarily closed to the public.

Tawny Chatmon: Inheritance at Fotografiska New York*

“Tawny Chatmon is a self-taught artist working in the field of photography for over 16 years. She sees her photographs as a first layer of communication, further articulated by uniting them with other photographic and artistic elements, including paint, digital collage, illustration and gold leaf. This exhibition, organized in collaboration with Galerie Myrtis, aims to change the traditional African American child’s experience in a museum setting will include works from her series The Awakening, Byzantine Contempo, and The Redemption.” — Fotografiska

“As the mother of three children, the primary theme that drives my current art practice is celebrating the beauty of African American children, maternal relationships and familial bonds. Presently I am drawn to creating portraits that are loosely inspired by works painted during the 15th-19th centuries with the specific intent of bringing to the forefront faces that were often under-celebrated in this style of work.” — Tawny Chatmon

Installation views of Tawny Chatmon: Inheritance. Photos by Corrado Serra.

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*PLEASE NOTE: Fotografiska New York is temporarily closed to the public.

The Thannhauser Collection at Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum*

“The Thannhauser Collection, formed by the collector and art dealer Justin K. Thannhauser (1892–1976), introduced to the Guggenheim’s holdings works by such groundbreaking artists as Edgar Degas, Édouard Manet, and Vincent van Gogh, and more than thirty examples by Pablo Picasso. This major gift provides an important survey of late 19th- and early 20th-century modernism. It was during this critical period—as artists sought to liberate art from academic genres and introduce contemporary subject matter—that the avant-garde investigated novel materials and methods, setting the stage for the development of radical new styles.

Justin Thannhauser was a vital figure in the dissemination of modern art in Europe and the United States in the early 20th century. From the 1910s, Justin Thannhauser worked alongside his father, Heinrich Thannhauser (1859–1935), in his Moderne Galerie in Munich and helped build a dynamic exhibition program that featured the French Impressionists and Post-Impressionists, in addition to contemporary German artists. The gallery provided a crucial venue for experimental art, mounting the premiere Der Blaue Reiter (The Blue Rider) group exhibition in 1911–12 and one of the first Picasso shows in Germany in 1913, among others.” — Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

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Vincent van Gogh. Mountains at Saint-Rémy (Montagnes à Saint-Rémy), July 1889. Oil on canvas, 71.8 x 90.8 cm. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, Thannhauser Collection, Gift, Justin K. Thannhauser

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Édouard Manet. Before the Mirror (Devant la glace), 1876. Oil on canvas, 92.1 x 71.4 cm. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, Thannhauser Collection, Gift, Justin K. Thannhauser

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Paul Cézanne. Still Life: Flask, Glass, and Jug (Fiasque, verre et poterie), ca. 1877. Oil on canvas, 45.7 x 55.3 cm. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Thannhauser Collection, Gift, Justin K. Thannhauser

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Camille Pissarro. The Hermitage at Pontoise (Les côteaux de l’Hermitage, Pontoise), 1867. Oil on canvas, 151.4 x 200.6 cm. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, Thannhauser Collection, Gift, Justin K. Thannhauser

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Edgar Degas. Dancers in Green and Yellow (Danseuses vertes et jaunes), ca. 1903. Pastel and charcoal on several pieces of tracing paper, mounted on paperboard, 98.8 x 71.5 cm. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Thannhauser Collection, Gift, Justin K. Thannhauser

The Thannhauser Collection is organized by Megan Fontanella, Curator, Modern Art and Provenance.

Title image: Installation view: Thannhauser Collection, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. Photo: David Heald. © Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, 2018

Images courtesy Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum.

*PLEASE NOTE: Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum is temporarily closed to the public.

New Architecture and Design Galleries at The Museum of Modern Art*

“The Museum of Modern Art opened on October 21 with galleries dedicated to architecture and design across all floors of the Museum. Each of these installations explores different topics, extending a dialogue with the integrated presentations of all mediums and chronologies throughout the collection galleries on the fifth, fourth, and second floors. The location of the architecture and design galleries on each of these floors, as well as on the first and third floors, reflects the curatorial vision of a ‘both–and’ approach, acknowledging architecture and design both as integral to the interdisciplinary conversation with the visual arts and as autonomous disciplines with specific histories and methodologies. 

These new and extensive spaces allow the Department of Architecture and Design not only to explore the collection through changing themes in regular rotations, but also to mount topical installations that leverage the Department’s holdings to address current disciplinary conversations and public concerns. This new approach to ever-evolving collection-based installations ensures that visitors can always view dynamic work from modern and contemporary architects and designers.” — MoMA

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Installation view of Architecture Systems (gallery 417), The Museum of Modern Art, New York. © 2019 The Museum of Modern Art. Photo: Robert Gerhardt

2019‑2021: 4th Fl Collection

Installation view of Architecture Systems (gallery 417), The Museum of Modern Art, New York. © 2019 The Museum of Modern Art. Photo: Robert Gerhardt

2nd Floor Collections (October 2019)

Installation view of Building Citizens (gallery 216), The Museum of Modern Art, New York. © 2019 The Museum of Modern Art. Photo: John Wronn

2nd Floor Collections (October 2019)

Installation view of Building Citizens (gallery 216), The Museum of Modern Art, New York. © 2019 The Museum of Modern Art. Photo: John Wronn

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Installation view of Energy, The Museum of Modern Art, New York. © 2019 The Museum of Modern Art. Photo: Heidi Bohnenkamp

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Installation view of Energy, The Museum of Modern Art, New York. © 2019 The Museum of Modern Art. Photo: Heidi Bohnenkamp

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Installation view of Taking a Thread for a Walk, The Museum of Modern Art, New York. © 2019 The Museum of Modern Art. Photo: Denis Doorly

Taking A Thread For A Walk

Installation view of Taking a Thread for a Walk, The Museum of Modern Art, New York. © 2019 The Museum of Modern Art. Photo: Denis Doorly

Images courtesy The Museum of Modern Art.

*PLEASE NOTE: The Museum of Modern Art is temporarily closed to the public.

Critical Zones, Observatories for Earthly Politics at ZKM, Karlsruhe, Germany, Virtual Opening May 22, 2020

“The planned exhibition Critical Zones about the critical state of the Earth coincides with a crisis period for humankind because of the coronavirus pandemic. A new Earthly politics also demands new policies for exhibitions.

Thus the physical Critical Zones exhibition currently taking shape on site at the ZKM will be connected to a digital exhibition and to a nonlocal event field in real and virtual space. Starting on May 22, 2020, the exhibition opens with a Streaming Festival lasting several days — the program will consist of streamed tours of the real exhibition and the virtual space, as well as interviews and talks. The ZKM will be a platform for a decentralized, nonlocal event field: it will come to the homes of the audience and as a ‘home museum’ will offer a virtual accompanying program with a wide variety of features. All existing channels — offline and online, real and virtual, analog and digital — will be connected in a novel way to transform an exhibition into a broadcasting program. In this multidimensional, multichannel communication between transmitter and receiver, the aim is to turn receivers into active transmitters. The exhibition will become an echo chamber, a resonating space of symbiotic forms of communication — a response to the symbiotic planet. The recognition that life on planet Earth arises and endures through the symbiosis of all lifeforms also demands new modes of communication between human beings.” — ZKM | Center for Art and Media

Julian Charrière - Future Fossil Spaces, 2017 - Installation View 013, La Biennale di Venezia 2017, Venice, Italy, 2017 (copyright the artist; VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, Germany)

Julian Charrière. Future Fossil Spaces, 2017. Salt from the Salar de Uyuni, acrylic containers filled with lithium-brine. Variable dimensions. Installation view: La Biennale di Venezia, Arsenale, 57th International Art Exhibition Viva Arte Viva. Photo: Jens Ziehe © Julian Charrière; VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, Germany. Courtesy: BUGADA & CARGNEL, Paris, France; DITTRICH & SCHLECHTRIEM, Berlin, Germany; Galerie Tschudi, Zuoz, Switzerland; Sean Kelly Gallery, New York, NY, USA; Sies + Höke Galerie, Düsseldorf, Germany

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Frédérique Aït-Touati, Alexandra Arènes, Axelle Grégoire. The Soil Map, detail, Terra Forma, manuel de cartographies potentielles, 2019 © the artists

A composite of Royal Air Force aerial photography from 1945 and ‘community satellite’ point clouds taken in 2017

A composite of Royal Air Force aerial photography from 1945 and ‘community satellite’ point clouds taken in 2017. Image: Ariel Caine / Forensic Architecture / Aziz al-Turi / Nuri al-Uqbi / Debby Ferber (Zochrot) / Hagit Keysar (PublicLab), 2017

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Caspar David Friedrich. Felsenriff am Meeresstrand [Rocky reef on the seashore], 1824. Oil on canvas. 22 x 31 cm. Collection Staatliche Kunsthalle Karlsruhe. Photo: bpk / Staatliche Kunsthalle Karlsruhe / Wolfgang Pankoke

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Jumana Manna. Wild Relatives, 2018. Film still. Courtesy the artist. Photo: Marte Vold © Jumana Manna

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Jumana Manna. Wild Relatives, 2018. Film still. Courtesy the artist. Photo: Marte Vold © Jumana Manna

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Uriel Orlow. Soil Affinities, 2018. Mixed media installation. Variable dimensions. Courtesy of the artist © Uriel Orlow

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Sarah Sze. Flash Point (Timekeeper), 2018. Mixed media installation. Wood, stainless steel, video projectors, acrylic, archival pigment prints, ceramic and tape. Variable dimensions © Sarah Sze

Claudia Gonzales Hidroscopia Loa 2018

Claudia Gonzales. Hidroscopia / Loa, 2018. Mixed media installation. Variable dimensions. Installation view: Museo de la Solidaridad Salvador Allende Santiago, Chile Photo: Lorna Remmle © Claudia Gonzales

“We must face up to what is literally a problem of dimension, scale, and lodging: the planet is much too narrow and limited for the globe of globalization; at the same time, it is too big, infinitely too large, too active, too complex, to remain within narrow and limited borders of locality whatsoever.” — Bruno Latour

Critical Zones curatorial committee: Bruno Latour and Peter Weibel with Martin Guinard-Terrin and Bettina Korintenberg.

Images courtesy ZKM | Center for Art and Media.

Jordan Casteel: Within Reach at New Museum, through May 24, 2020*

“The New Museum presents Jordan Casteel: Within Reach, an exhibition of work by New York–based artist Jordan Casteel (b. 1989, Denver, Colorado), on view in the Museum’s Second Floor Gallery. Bringing together nearly forty paintings spanning her career, including works from her celebrated series Visible Man (2013–14) and Nights in Harlem (2017), along with recent portraits of her students at Rutgers University-Newark, this is Casteel’s first solo museum exhibition in New York City.

In her large-scale oil paintings, Casteel has developed a distinctive figurative language permeated by the presence of her subjects, who are typically captured in larger-than-life depictions that teem with domestic details and psychological insights.

Portraying people from communities in which she has lived and worked—including former classmates at Yale, where she earned an MFA; street vendors and neighbors near her home in Harlem; and her own students at Rutgers University-Newark in New Jersey—Casteel insists upon the ordinary, offering scenes with both the informality of a snapshot and the frontality of an official portrait. In these richly colorful works, Casteel draws upon ongoing conversations on portraiture that encompass race, gender, and subjectivity, connecting her practice to the legacy of artists like Alice Neel, Faith Ringgold, and Bob Thompson, among others. Casteel’s studies in anthropology and sociology also inform her works, which can often be read as a reflection on the presentation of the self in everyday life and as an investigation of the relationships that tie together intimacy and distance, familiarity and otherness.” — New Museum

Installation views of Jordan Casteel: Within Reach. Photos by Corrado Serra.

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Jordan Casteel: Within Reach was curated by Massimiliano Gioni, Edlis Neeson Artistic Director.

*PLEASE NOTE: The New Museum is temporarily closed to the public.

Peter Saul: Crime and Punishment at New Museum, through May 31, 2020*

“The New Museum presents Peter Saul: Crime and Punishment, the first New York survey exhibition of the work of Peter Saul (b. 1934, San Francisco, CA), on view throughout the Museum’s Third and Fourth Floor galleries. For over fifty years, Saul has been one of America’s boldest and most iconoclastic painters. The exhibition at the New Museum brings together approximately sixty paintings from across his long career.

Beginning in the early 1960s, Saul began to incorporate imagery borrowed from a range of pop-cultural sources into his exuberant, brightly colored paintings, adopting a style that has proven to be far ahead of its time. His work developed independently from concurrent art historical movements like Pop art, with which it shares some superficially similar concerns. Instead of the cool detachment of Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein, however, Saul crafted his own unique blend of Surrealism, history painting, vernacular illustration, and the real-life shock and horror of current events. This madcap formula has allowed the artist to critique art historical pretensions while addressing the outsized characters and realities of his day. Long considered outside the narrative of twentieth-century art, Peter Saul’s work has gained greater appreciation as younger artists register his influence.” — New Museum 

Installation views of Peter Saul: Crime and Punishment. Photos by Corrado Serra.

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Peter Saul: Crime and Punishment was curated by Massimiliano Gioni, Edlis Neeson Artistic Director, and Gary Carrion-Murayari, Kraus Family Curator.

*PLEASE NOTE: The New Museum is temporarily closed to the public.

Works & Process at the Guggenheim presents Virtual Works & Process: In Process with Ephrat Asherie Dance, April 26, 2020 at 7:30pm

Works & Process, the performing arts series at the Guggenheim, presents a Virtual Works & Process: In Process with Ephrat Asherie Dance on Sunday, April 26, 2020 at 7:30pm. The event is free, but space is limited and RSVP is required; a Zoom link and password will be emailed the day of the performance.

Ahead of the fall premiere of UnderScored by Ephrat Asherie Dance, audiences will enjoy a special look into the Works & Process commission from home. Joined by dramaturg Melanie George, Bessie Award winning choreographer Ephrat Asherie will discuss her creative method and the unique process of choreographing and rehearsing new work through video conferencing technology. Company dancers through zoom will rehearse and perform excerpts.

UnderScored premieres the Fall 2020. Blurring the lines between performance and living archive and beginning with the legendary parties at The Loft and the Paradise Garage, UnderScored is inspired by intergenerational club-life memories and explores the ever-changing physical and musical landscape of New York City’s underground dance scene. Ephrat Asherie Dance company members and guest artists from New York City’s underground dance community will perform.

UnderScored by Ephrat Asherie, January 13, 2020. Performed by Ephrat Asherie Dance. Commissioned by Works & Process at the Guggenheim. Photos: Robert Altman.

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This Works & Process program will be hosted virtually through Zoom. Audience members should have access to a computer with Wi-Fi. For more information, email info@worksandprocess.org or visit worksandprocess.org.

Images courtesy Ephrat Asherie Dance.

Migrating Objects: Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas in the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice, through June 14, 2020*

“The Peggy Guggenheim Collection presents Migrating Objects: Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas in the Peggy Guggenheim Collection. Peggy Guggenheim challenged boundaries as a patron and collector and is celebrated for her groundbreaking European and American modern art collection. This exhibition focuses on a lesser-known, but crucial episode in Guggenheim’s collecting: her turn in the 1950s and ’60s to works created by artists in Africa, Oceania, and the indigenous Americas.

Migrating Objects represents a remarkable occasion to view 35 rarely seen non-Western artworks Guggenheim collected, shown at the Peggy Guggenheim Collection as a cohesive whole for the first time. This exhibition presents Guggenheim’s African, Oceanic, and indigenous Americas objects in groupings privileging their original contexts or, alternately, in dialogue with European works from her collection by avant-garde artists who appropriated ideas from cultures beyond Europe’s borders. These opposing approaches enable an exploration of the flawed narratives that Western culture imposed on objects of this kind.” — Peggy Guggenheim Collection

Installation views of Migrating Objects: Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas in the Peggy Guggenheim Collection. February 15–June 14, 2020. Photo Matteo De Fina © Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice.

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Migrating Objects: Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas in the Peggy Guggenheim Collection was curated by Christa Clarke, R. Tripp Evans, Ellen McBreen, and Fanny Wonu Veys, with Vivien Greene.

Title image: Two-faced helmet mask (wanyugo), probably mid-20th century. Unrecorded Senufo artist, Côte d’Ivoire. Wood, 44 x 71 x 33 cm. Photo © manusardi.it

Images courtesy Peggy Guggenheim Collection.

*PLEASE NOTE: The Peggy Guggenheim Collection is temporarily closed to the public.