Minia Biabiany “Musa Nuit” at Fondation d’entreprise Hermès, June 27 – September 5, 2020

For the fourth segment of the series “Matters of Concern | Matières à panser” at La Verrière, the Brussels art space of the Fondation d’entreprise Hermès, curator Guillaume Désanges presents a solo exhibition by the artist Minia Biabiany (b. 1988, Guadeloupe).

“Since the early 2010s, Minia Biabiany has developed a corpus of great subtlety, in sculpture, graphic work and film, characterised by its economy of form and its proliferation in space. Her eclectic palette of materials (cotton, wood, plastic, metal rods, bamboo, banana leaves, salt, chalk, and more) is orchestrated with crystalline precision, like a series of clues set down in response to a guiding narrative that is otherwise unseen. And yet this ethereal work – suggestive rather than directive, with a discreet elegance that transcends its (literally) raw materials – may be seen as ‘loaded’, too. It is haunted by issues of identity connected to the history of Guadeloupe and the Caribbean as a whole (the artist’s home region, where she continues to work and reflect). Here, the weight of this geopolitical legacy, marked by French cultural assimilation, colonialism and the transatlantic slave trade, is conveyed in the sounds, materials, words and infinitesimal gestures that constitute her practice. The magnetism of her work, more sensual than discursive, more poetic than overtly political, resides in a ‘memory of things’ comparable to the memory of water: an indelible yet transparent mark, an afterglow that shines through the surface of objects and may be reactivated in the service of creative catharsis.” — From the text by Guillaume Désanges

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Installation The unity is submarine by Minia Biabiany, exhibition “In the Belly of the Whale”, 2016, Witte de With, Rotterdam (Netherlands). Courtesy of the artist © Minia Biabiany

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Installation The unity is submarine by Minia Biabiany, exhibition “In the Belly of the Whale”, 2016, Witte de With, Rotterdam (Netherlands). Courtesy of the artist © Minia Biabiany

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Minia Biabiany, Leyendo plantas, 2015, mixed media. Courtesy of the artist © Minia Biabiany

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Minia Biabiany, Leyendo plantas, 2015, mixed media. Courtesy of the artist © Minia Biabiany

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Minia Biabiany, detail of the installation Murmuran que el cabello es la memoria, 2017, black-and-white digital photograph. Courtesy of the artist © Minia Biabiany

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Minia Biabiany, Sex sintaxis, 2015, mixed media. Courtesy of the artist © Minia Biabiany

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Minia Biabiany, jou wouvé, the beginning II, 2017, colour video, 3.21 min. Courtesy of the artist © Minia Biabiany

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Still from Minia Biabiany’s video, Blue Spelling, a change of perspective is a change of temporality, 2017, 2.22 min. Courtesy of the artist © Minia Biabiany

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Still from Minia Biabiany’s video, flè a poyo, restauring the body, 2015, 5.50 min. Courtesy of the artist © Minia Biabiany

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Still from Minia Biabiany’s video, flè a poyo, restauring the body, 2015, 5.50 min. Courtesy of the artist © Minia Biabiany

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Minia Biabiany, Toli Toli, 2018, colour video, 10 min. Courtesy of the artist © Minia Biabiany

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Portrait of Minia Biabiany. Courtesy of the artist © Minia Biabiany Courtesy of the artist © Nicolas Colón

Concurrent with the exhibition “Musa Nuit” at La Verrière, Brussels (Belgium), Minia Biabiany presented “J’ai tué le papillon dans mon oreille” at MAGASIN des Horizons, Grenoble (France).

Images courtesy Fondation d’entreprise Hermès.

Fantastic Women – Surreal Worlds from Meret Oppenheim to Frida Kahlo at Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, July 25 – November 8, 2020

“The exhibition Fantastic Women – Surreal Worlds from Meret Oppenheim to Frida Kahlo at Louisiana Museum of Modern Art is the first major general presentation of female Surrealists. More than 260 works by 34 artists from the USA, Mexico and Europe demonstrate how their involvement and participation in the movement was greater than previously known and described. The exhibition presents works by among others Meret Oppenheim, Louise Bourgeois, Leonora Carrington, Dora Maar, Lee Miller and Frida Kahlo.

Goddess, she-devil, doll, fetish, child-woman or wonderful dream-creation – the woman or the idea of the feminine was the central element in the male Surrealists’ imaginations. At first the female artists became part of the inner circle of Surrealism primarily as models, but soon they broke out of the traditional roles and manifested themselves with their own works.

The exhibition shows how they worked within themes, which in many cases were already associated with Surrealism, but also how they differ from the male artists. The aspect that most clearly differentiates the female Surrealists from their male colleagues is the inversion of perspective. The female artists sought a (new) female identity model. This often involved an investigation of their own reflections and playing with various roles.” — Louisiana Museum of Modern Art

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Bridget Tichenor, The Surrealists/The Specialists, 1956. Oil on Mazonite, 40 x 30,2 cm. Private Collection, Mexico © Bridget Tichenor

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Claude Cahun, Self-portrait (I am in Training… Don’t Kiss Me), ca. 1927. Vintage gelatin silver print, 11,7 x 8,9 cm. Private Collection © Claude Cahun

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Frida Kahlo, Selfportrait with thorn necklace and hummingbird, 1940. Oil on canvas mounted to board. Collection of Harry Ransom Center, The University of Texas at Austin, Nickolas Muray Collection of Modern Mexican Art © Banco de México Diego Rivera Frida Kahlo Museum Trust / VISDA 2020

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Jacqueline Lamba, André Breton, Yves Tanguy, Cadavre exquis, 1938. Collage on paper, The Mayor Gallery, London © VISDA 2020

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Jane Graverol, The School of Vanity, 1967. Oil and collage on cardboard, 62 x 98 cm. Rosine Ortmans, © Jane Graverol / VISDA 2020. Photo: Renaud Schrobiltgen

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Kay Sage, At the Appointed Time, 1942. Oil on canvas. Newark Museum of Art, Bequest of Kay Sage Tanguy, 1964 © Estate of Kay Sage/ VISDA 2020

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Leonor Fini, Chtonian Deity Watching over the Sleep of a Young Man, 1946. Oil on Canvas, 27,9 x 41,3 cm. Weinstein Gallery, San Francisco and Francis Naumann Gallery, New York © VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2019

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Leonora Carrington, Self-portrait, ca. 1937/38. Oil on canvas, 65 x 81.3 cm. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York © Leonora Carrington / VISDA 2020

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Louise Bourgeois, Torso, Self-Portrait, 1963-64. Bronze, painted white, wall piece, 62,9 x 40,6 x 20 cm. Collection the Easton Foundation © The Easton Foundation / VISDA

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Toyen, Le Paravent, 1966. Oil and collage on canvas. Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris © VISDA 2020

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Meret Oppenheim, Venus Primitive, 1933-62. Painted terracotta, glaced straw, 64 x 26,5 x 20 cm. Kunstmuseum Solothurn © Meret Oppenheim / VISDA 2020

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Remedios Varo, Creación con rayos astrales, 1955. Oil and tempera on masonite, 67,4 x 42,6 cm. Private Colleciton, Courtesy ART VIA Collection © VISDA 2020

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Frida Kahlo, The Little Deer, 1946. Oil on masonite, 22.5 x 30.3 cm. Private Collection © Banco de México Diego Rivera Frida Kahlo Museum Trust / VISDA 2019. Photo: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago

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Leonora Carrington, Portrait of the late Mrs. Partridge, 1947. Oil on wood, 100.3 x 69.9 cm. Private Collection © Leonora Carrington / VISDA 2019. Photo: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago

Exhibition is organized by curator Kirsten Degel.

Images courtesy Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Humlebæk, Denmark.

Variations: Eugène Frey’s Light Set Projections presented by João Maria Gusmão at Nouveau Musée National de Monaco, Villa Paloma, through August 30, 2020

“Variations is an exhibition devoted to the lesser-known art of Light Set projections, a stage design technique established in 1900 in the tradition of shadow theatres and magic lantern shows and developed on the Opéra de Monte-Carlo stage up until the 1930s.

Eugène Frey (Brussels 1864 – Courbevoie 1942) was a painter and an artist whose work has been forgotten by the history of art and stage. In 1900 he invented the technique for ‘Décors Lumineux à transformations’, a complex system of light projections mixing pictorial, photographic and cinematographic techniques to bring diverse variations of colours, lights and forms to stage scenery, while also integrating moving pictures. He developed this unique process for on the stage of the Opéra de Monte-Carlo from 1904 to 1938.

With the aim of rediscovering Frey’s prolific work, the NMNM has invited the artist João Maria Gusmão (Lisbon 1979) to reinterpret his Light Set projection technique.

Likening his research to a metaphysical inquiry in the field of analogue experimental media, with references to early film pioneers (such as Eadweard Muybridge), as well as science philosophers and physicists (James Clerk Maxwell, Ernst Mach), João Maria Gusmão has developed a scenographic installation composed of multiple modified slide projectors. Synchronised in the Villa Paloma’s different spaces, they reactivate Frey’s different animation techniques in the form of a ‘continuous light micro-cinema’.” ― NMNM Villa Paloma

Exhibition views of Variations: Eugène Frey’s Light Set Projections, presented by João Maria Gusmão at Nouveau Musée National de Monaco Villa Paloma. Photos: Andrea Rossetti, 2020.

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Hans ‐ Peter Feldmann, Schattenspiel (Shadow Game), 2002. NMNM Collection. Acquisition with the support of the Association of Friends of the NMNM.

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Lourdes Castro, Teatro de Sombras (Theater of Shadows), 1978. Extracts from the film “Return to Portugal: Lourdes Castro de Madeira “, produced and produced by José Maria Berzosa and broadcast on Antenna 2 in the program “From one country the other” on the 20th august 1978, 3’57 ’’, National Audiovisual Institute.

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Emmanuel Cottier, Théâtre d’ombres (Theater of Shadows), 1915-1920, NMNM Collection.

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Left to right: Léon Sandis, Théâtre d’ombres (Theater of Shadows), n.d.; Georges Redon, Théâtre d’ombres, La Boîte à Musique (Theater of Shadows, The Nightclub of Music), 1897. Collection of the Cinémathèque française; Lotte Reiniger, The Adventures of Prince Ahmed, 1926. National Archive British Film Institute.

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Left: Eugène Frey, Studies for the Light Set of “Terpsichore”, ca. 1900 and Scenes from review shows, n.d. Right: João Maria Gusmão, Light House, 2020.

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Michel Ocelot, Illuminated paintings for “The Castle of the Witchand” and “The Coat of the Old lady”, ca. 1989, Michel Ocelot Collection.

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Eugène Frey, Plates for “La Walkyrie”, ca. 1909 Monte ‐ Carlo Company Sea Baths.

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Alphonse Visconti and Eugène Frey, Scenery model for “La Walkyrie”, Acte III, The Ride of the Walkyries, ca. 1909. Monte ‐ Carlo Société des Bains de Mer in permanent deposit at NMNM.

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Eugène Frey, Studies and glass plates for the light set of “the Damnation of Faust” / “Mephistopheles”, ca. 1905. NMNM Collections, Monte ‐ Carlo Société of the Baths of Sea and Nicéphore Museum Niépce.

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The Songs of Faust on the banks of the Elbe, n.d. Parade of characters, n.d. Magic lantern plates. Collection of the Cinémathèque française.

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Left: Alphonse Visconti, Stage model for “Pompeii”, 2nd painting, 1921. Right: Eugène Frey, Study for the illumination of “Pompeii”, 2nd painting, ca. 1921.

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João Maria Gusmão, RGB, 2020.

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Left to right: João Maria Gusmão, RGB, 2020 (projectors); João Maria Gusmão + Pedro Paiva, Green Orange, 2018; Jules Chéret, Folies ‐ Bergère – La Loïe Fuller, 1893, Collection of the Cinémathèque française.

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Left: Eugène Frey, Painted glass plates for decorations bright, unidentified, n.d. Monte ‐ Carlo Société des Bains de Mer. Right: João Maria Gusmão + Pedro Paiva, Sunset, 2017.

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João Maria Gusmão + Pedro Paiva, Camera inside camera, 2010.

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João Maria Gusmão, Tartan, 2019. Produced by the Biennial of Contemporary Art Anozero ‐ Coimbra in 2019.

Variations: Eugène Frey’s Light Set Projections was curated by Célia Bernasconi.

Title image: Eugène Frey, Study for the light set of “The Enchanted Flute”, ca. 1921. Graphite pencil, black ink and gouache on black card, 24 x 41.2 cm. NMNM Collection, n° 2003.7.93 © NMNM / Marcel Loli.

Images courtesy Musée National de Monaco, Villa Paloma.

KUSAMA: Cosmic Nature at New York Botanical Garden, Spring – Fall 2021*

“Contemporary Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama (b. 1929) is one of the most popular artists in the world, inspiring millions to experience her immersive installations. KUSAMA: Cosmic Nature is our multisensory presentation of Yayoi Kusama’s profound connection with the natural world.

With NYBG as the exclusive exhibition venue, Kusama will reveal her lifelong fascination with the natural world, beginning with her childhood spent in the greenhouses and fields of her family’s seed nursery. Her artistic concepts of obliteration, infinity, and eternity are inspired by her intimate engagement with the colors and patterns of plants and flowers.

Explore Kusama’s eternal love for plants through multiple installations featuring her multifaceted art across NYBG’s 250-acre landmark landscape and buildings—including a seasonally changing flower show in the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory and her nature-based paintings and biomorphic collages in the LuEsther T. Mertz Library.” — New York Botanical Garden

A Special Message from Yayoi Kusama

The passion that I and those at The New York Botanical Garden have poured into this exhibition is still burning. Everyone, I hope you will wait. We aspire for endless love permeated with everyone’s hearts of human love, a wish for peace in the world, our dreams, and wonders of hope—it is our wish that this exhibition can offer these as its greatest gift. I hope you all can wait. With all my heart, Yayoi Kusama

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I Want to Go to the Universe, 2013. Acrylic on canvas, 76-3/8 x 76-3/8 in. Collection of the artist. Courtesy of Ota Fine Arts, Victoria Miro, and David Zwirner.

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Alone, Buried in A Flower Garden, 2014. Acrylic on canvas , 76-3/8 x 76-3/8 in. Collection of the artist. Courtesy of Ota Fine Arts, Victoria Miro, and David Zwirner.

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Life, 2015. Fiber-reinforced plastic, glass tile. Dimensions variable. Collection of the artist. Courtesy of Ota Fine Arts.

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Pumpkins Screaming About Love Beyond Infinity, 2017. Mirrors, acrylic, glass, LEDs, wood panels. Dimensions variable. Collection of the artist.

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Summer Flower, 1988. Acrylic on canvas, 45.5 x 53 cm. Collection of the artist.

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Flower Obsession (Sunflower), 2000. Video still. Collection of the artist.

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Infinity Mirrored Room—Illusion Inside the Heart, 2020 Steel, glass 300 x 300 x 300 cm. Collection of the artist Courtesy of Ota Fine Arts, Victoria Miro, and David Zwirner

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Yayoi Kusama, 2020

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The Kusama Family, c. 1929

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Portrait of Kusama around the age of ten, ca. 1939. Courtesy of the artist.

Images courtesy New York Botanical Garden.

*PLEASE NOTE: New York Botanical Garden is temporarily closed to the public.

Reencounter at Museo Nacional del Prado, June 6 – September 13, 2020

The Museo del Prado is reopening with a spectacular new installation of its permanent collection. The Central Gallery, an extensive architectural space flooded with natural light, now becomes the principal axis for this new hanging which includes the majority of the collection’s most iconic works, offering a unique and unprecedented experience.

This new installation, comprising 249 works, follows a principally chronological order from the 15th century to the dawn of the 20th century. Given its exceptional nature, however, the emphasis on national schools has been reduced in favour of establishing dialogues between artists and paintings separated by time and place: associations that suggest influences, admiration and rivalries and which emphasise the profoundly self-referential nature of the Museo del Prado’s collections.  

‘Reencounter’ evokes the type of display that existed when the Museo del Prado first opened to the public.” ― Museo Nacional del Prado

Exhibition views of “Reencounter”.

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Room 24. Photo © Museo Nacional del Prado

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Room 12. Photo © Museo Nacional del Prado

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Room 32. Photo © Museo Nacional del Prado

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Room 28. Photo © Museo Nacional del Prado

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Room 8B. Photo © Museo Nacional del Prado

Title image: “Reencounter”. Photo © Museo Nacional del Prado. 

Images courtesy Museo Nacional del Prado.

Fondazione Prada, Milan, reopened June 5, 2020

Fondazione Prada reopened its doors in Milan on June 5, 2020. After the interruption of activities due to the health emergency, the exhibition program of the Milan venue is modified. The exhibition spaces will be accessible to the public from Friday to Sunday, from 10 am to 7 pm. Audience will be able to visit the three temporary exhibitions “K”, “The Porcelain Room”, and “Storytelling”.

“K”, a project that explores the literary universe of Franz Kafka through the works of Martin Kippenberger, Orson Welles, and Tangerine Dream, is extended until October 25, 2020.

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Martin Kippenberger. The Happy End of Franz Kafka’s “Amerika,” 1994. Mixed media (chairs, tables, and other objects), electric cables, green base painted with white lines, two bleachers. c. 30 x 20 m. Private collection. For this installation also Memphis and Private collection, Milan © Estate of Martin Kippenberger, Galerie Gisela Capitain, Cologne

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Orson Welles. The Trial, 1962. 118 min. English with Italian subtitles. Distributed by Filmauro. Screened in loop from 10:15 am to 6:15 pm

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Tangerine Dream. Franz Kafka, the Castle, 2013. 69 min. Produced by Edgar Froese. Distributed by Eastgate Music & Arts, Berlin. Played in loop

“The Porcelain Room”, an artistic investigation on the historical context, purpose and impact of Chinese export porcelain, is extended until January 10, 2021.

Exhibition views of  “The Porcelain Room – Chinese Export Porcelain”. Curated by Jorge Welsh and Luísa Vinhais. Fondazione Prada, Milan. Photos: Delfino Sisto Legnani.

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“Storytelling”, a solo show devoted to artist Liu Ye, is extended until January 10, 2021.

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Liu Ye. The Little Match-seller, 2004. Acrylic on canvas, 220 x 180 cm. M+, Hong Kong

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Liu Ye. Left: Mondrian in the Morning, 2000. Acrylic on canvas, 180 x 180 cm. Private Collection, Beijing. Right: Prelude, 2018. Acrylic on canvas, 40 x 30 cm. Private Collection, Beijing

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Liu Ye. Catherine Deneuve, 2012. Acrylic on canvas, 60 x 45 cm. Private Collection, Beijing

Fondazione Prada’s website and social channels will continue to operate as a laboratory of ideas and a flexible and creative platform where new digital projects such as “Love Stories”, conceived by Francesco Vezzoli for Fondazione Prada’s Instagram account and running until July 19, 2020, will be developed.

The venetian outpost of Ca’ Corner della Regina and Osservatorio in Milan will reopen to the public in 2021.

Title image: Fondazione Prada, Milan. Photo by Bas Princen.

Images courtesy Fondazione Prada.

Tetsumi Kudo: Cultivation at Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, through August 16, 2020

Japanese artist Tetsumi Kudo (1935-1990) was a radical and visionary outsider. Almost forgotten until recently, Kudo is being rediscovered internationally due to his foreboding depictions of an ailing world and the emergence of a ‘new ecology’.

This exhibition’s laboratory of remarkable cultivation environments allows us to study Kudo’s radiantly coloured and grotesque propositions for the cultivation of life in a world, where humans, technology and polluted nature have merged.

By combining found materials and modelled elements into peculiar sculptures, Kudo conspicu­ously anticipated many of the aesthetic trends we see in contemporary art as well as the present-day penchant for the surreal and grotesque. His works also appear strikingly relevant in the cultural and political agendas of today when it comes to e.g. environment and procreation.

Kudo’s work is affected by a childhood in Japan in the aftermath of the atomic bomb. His approach to humanity’s self-destruction and ecological decadence however is both unsentimental and even quite humorous in its dealing with how new life can develop in spite of everything.” ― Louisiana Museum of Modern Art

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Tetsumi Kudo. Cultivation by Radioactivity in the Electronic Circuit, 1968. Mixed media. Louisiana Museum of Modern Art ©Tetsumi Kudo Adagp, Paris 2020 / VISDA

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Tetsumi Kudo. Cultivation by Radioactivity in the Electronic Circuit, 1968. Mixed media. Louisiana Museum of Modern Art ©Tetsumi Kudo Adagp, Paris 2020 / VISDA

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Tetsumi Kudo. Pollution – Cultivation – New Ecology (Portrait of Ionecso), 1971. Assemblage: Mixed media. Louisiana Museum of Modern Art © Tetsumi Kudo Adagp, Paris 2020 / VISDA

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Tetsumi Kudo. Cultivation by Radioactivity, 1967. UV tube, papier maché, paint, wire, 175 x 63 x 50 cm. Collection Fabre. Photo: documenta archiv / Fabian Frinzel © Tetsumi Kudo / Adagp, Paris 2020 / VISDA

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Tetsumi Kudo. Cultivation by Radioactivity in the Electronic Circuit (Pink Flower), 1968. Plastic, plexi glass, polyester, 65 x 25 x 25 cm. Courtesy of Andrea Rosen Gallery. Photo: Jessica Eckert © Tetsumi Kudo / Adagp, Paris 2020 / VISDA

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Tetsumi Kudo. Cultivation by Nature & People Who Are Looking at It, 1970-71. Plastic bucket, plastic, mirrored glass, papier maché, cotton, artificial soil, resin, adhesive, paint, artificial hair, 36 x 23 x 23 cm. Private Collection © Tetsumi Kudo / Adagp, Paris 2020 / VISDA

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Tetsumi Kudo. Bonheur, 1974. Happiness, 1974. Cage, paint, artificial soil, plastic flowers, cotton, plastic, resin, string, cigarettes, thermometer, Aspro tablets, circuit board, 29 x 48 x 22 cm. Courtesy of Andrea Rosen Gallery. Photo: Lance Brewer © Tetsumi Kudo / Adagp, Paris 2020 / VISDA

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Tetsumi Kudo. Paradise, 1980. Cage, paint, plastic flower, plastic, metal coins, resin, 78 x 36 x 20,3 cm. Private Collection, Courtesy Andrea Rosen Gallery. Photo: Lance Brewer © Tetsumi Kudo / Adagp, Paris 2020 / VISDA

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Tetsumi Kudo. Flowers, 1967-68. From: Garden of the Metamorphosis in the Space Capsule, 1968. 10 artificial flowers, paper, iron. Private Collection, Courtesy Hauser & Wirth and Andrea Rosen Gallery © Tetsumi Kudo / Adagp, Paris 2020 / VISDA

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Tetsumi Kudo. Human Bonsai – Freedom of Deformity – Deformity of Freedom, 1979. Artificial soil, resin, plastic, wood, paint, cotton, wire, metal chain, glass beads, 39 x 74 x 22 cm. Private Collection, Courtesy Hauser & Wirth and Andrea Rosen Gallery © Tetsumi Kudo / Adagp, Paris 2020 / VISDA

Tetsumi Kudo: Cultivation is organized and curated by Tine Colstrup. 

Images courtesy Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Humlebæk, Denmark.

Richard Artschwager at Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, through Autumn, 2020

“The Guggenheim Museum Bilbao presents the exhibition Richard Artschwager, a unique occasion to survey the creative career of Richard Artschwager (Washington, D.C., 1923 – Albany, New York, 2013), an artist who worked halfway between painting and sculpture and who developed a unique language using the new domestic materials of his time. This ambitious project, conceived by world-renowned curator Germano Celant and co-organized by the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao and MART – Museo di Arte Moderna e Contemporanea di Trento e Rovereto, comprises almost 70 pieces alongside a selection of rarely-seen archival documentation.

Designed as an open labyrinth highlighting the main nuclei of Artschwager’s oeuvre, the exhibition features a comprehensive selection of paintings and sculptures dating from the early 1960s to the first decade of the 21st century: from his first wood and Formica structures and paintings on Celotex to his nylon-bristle sculptures and ‘corner pieces,’ including works in horsehair and so-called blps, which the artist began making in 1968 and displaying individually or on a citywide scale. Artschwager, who had a crucial experience as a cabinetmaker at the beginning of his career, always worked toward the fusion of figuration and abstraction, artistic innovation and design, and ironically sought to combine the functional and the useless.” ― Guggenheim Museum Bilbao

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Richard Artschwager. Table and Chair, 1963-64. Melamine and wood. 755 x 1320 x 952 mm. Object: 1143 x 438 x 533 mm. Tate: Purchased 1983. Photo: Tate © Estate of Richard Artschwager, VEGAP, Bilbao, 2020

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Richard Artschwager. Apartment House, 1964. Liquitex, Celotex, Formica. 177 x 126.5 x 16 cm. Museum Ludwig, Köln. Donation Collection Ludwig, 1976 © Estate of Richard Artschwager, VEGAP, Bilbao, 2020

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Richard Artschwager. Fabrikhalle, 1969. Acrylic paint on drywall and chipboard, HPL. 73.30 x 92.60 x 7 cm. Museum Ulm – Stiftung Sammlung Kurt Fried. Photo: Armin Buhl © Estate of Richard Artschwager, VEGAP, Bilbao, 2020

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Richard Artschwager. Tower III (Confessional), 1980. Formica and oak. 152.5 x 119 x 81.1 cm. Emanuel Hoffmann Foundation, permanent loan to the Öffentliche Kunstsammlung Basel. Photo: Bisig & Bayer, Basel Estate of Richard Artschwager, VEGAP, Bilbao, 2020

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Richard Artschwager. Two Point Perspective, 1994. Acrylic on Celotex, Formica on wood, acrylic on wood. 136 x 139 x 5 cm. Kunstmuseen Krefeld, Heinz and Marianne Ebers-Stiftung © Estate of Richard Artschwager, VEGAP, Bilbao, 2020

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Richard Artschwager. Door }, 1983-84. Acrylic and lacquer on wood and glass, metal, two parts. 207.6 x 165.1 x 24.8 cm. Collection Kerstin Hiller and Helmut Schmelzer, on loan to Neues Museum Nürnberg. Photo: Annette Kradisch © Estate of Richard Artschwager, VEGAP, Bilbao, 2020

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Richard Artschwager. Search for Tomorrow, 2004. Acrylic and fiber panel on artist’s frame. 120.6 x 189.2 cm. Private collection © Estate of Richard Artschwager, VEGAP, Bilbao, 2020

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Richard Artschwager. Exclamation Point, 2010. Plastic bristles on a mahogany core painted with latex. 165.1 × 55.9 × 55.9 cm. Private collection. Courtesy Gallery Xavier Hufkens, Brussels. Photo: Allan Bovenberg © Estate of Richard Artschwager, VEGAP, Bilbao, 2020

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Richard Artschwager. Standing woman (Dirne), 1999. Acrylic, rubberized hair on Masonite. 213.4 x 114.3 x 6.4 cm. Private collection, Vienna © Estate of Richard Artschwager, VEGAP, Bilbao, 2020

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Richard Artschwager. City of Man, 1981. Acrylic and charcoal on Celotex and plastic laminate with plexiglass. 197.5 × 458 × 13.3 cm. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York. Promised gift of Emily Fisher Landau P.2010.17.a-c © Estate of Richard Artschwager, VEGAP, Bilbao, 2020

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Richard Artschwager. Portrait Zero, 1961. Wood, screws, and rope. 114.9 x 68.7 x 14 cm. Sammlung Michalke, Germany © Estate of Richard Artschwager, VEGAP, Bilbao, 2020

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Richard Artschwager. Weave (Green), 1991. Acrylic and Celotex on panel. 171.2 x 131 x 9 cm. Courtesy Galleria Alfonso Artiaco, Napoli. Photo: Luciano Romano © Estate of Richard Artschwager, VEGAP, Bilbao, 2020

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Richard Artschwager. Table Prepared in the Presence of Enemies II, 1992. Wood, metal, screws and Formica. The SYZ Collection, Switzerland © Estate of Richard Artschwager, VEGAP, Bilbao, 2020

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Richard Artschwager. Splatter Table, 1992. Laminate, wood, aluminum. Variable dimensions. Collection S.M.A.K., Stedelijk Museum voor Actuele Kunst Ghent © Estate of Richard Artschwager, VEGAP, Bilbao, 2020

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Richard Artschwager. This Way – That Way, 2012. Acrylic on handmade paper on soundboard. 130 x 116.8 cm. Augustus and Clara Artschwager Collection, Courtesy of Gagosian © Estate of Richard Artschwager, VEGAP, Bilbao, 2020

Richard Artschwager was curated by Germano Celant and Manuel Cirauqui, curator of the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao.

Images courtesy Guggenheim Museum Bilbao.

Memos. On Fashion in This Millennium at Museo Poldi Pezzoli, Milan, through September 28, 2020

“The project, in the form of an exhibition and a catalogue, aims to spark off a series of reflections on contemporary fashion, its qualities and its attributes, taking as its starting point Italo Calvino’s Six Memos for the Next Millennium, the series of Charles Eliot Norton Poetry Lectures that the writer was supposed to give at Harvard University in the autumn of 1985. Calvino died suddenly in September of the same year, but his wife Esther decided to publish what he had written for them. Thus the incisive and inclusive word Memos has been chosen as the title of the exhibition.

Reading Calvino today raises a fundamental question: can fashion, given its nature as a cultural industry, as a system of communication, as a rich, hybrid and problematic territory, be considered a scientific and poetic practice, and therefore a naturally literary one? So the exhibition uses Calvino’s words as devices to reflect on what has changed and what has stayed the same in fashion. Memos also evokes the legendary typewritten notes Diana Vreeland used to make when she was editor of the American edition of Vogue. Notes, intended for the editorial staff, that sum up the speed with which Vreeland’s imagination operated. Notes that functioned as mood boards made up of words.

The selection of objects: the clothes, magazines and ephemera that are part of the stories told by fashion, and that help to organize the exhibition into a sequence of three-dimensional ‘memos’, include among other things clothes designed by the most important fashion designers.” ― Museo Poldi Pezzoli

Installation views of Memos. On Fashion in This Millennium.

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Memos. On Fashion in This Millennium was conceived and curated by Maria Luisa Frisa. Exhibition project was by Judith Clark. Visual design was by Stefano Tonchi.

Images courtesy Museo Poldi Pezzoli.

Olafur Eliasson: In Real Life at Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, through Autumn, 2020

“The Guggenheim Museum Bilbao presents Olafur Eliasson: In real life, a survey of the career of Olafur Eliasson (1967), one of today’s most prominent artists. Through around 30 works created between 1990 and 2020 – including sculptures, photographs, paintings, and installations – the exhibition challenges the way we navigate and perceive our environment, leading us to reflect on the urgent issues of today.

Eliasson’s art derives from an interest in perception, movement, embodied experience, and feelings of self. Central to his artistic practice are his concern with nature, inspired by time spent in Iceland; his research into geometry; and his ongoing investigations into how we perceive, feel about, and shape the world around us. His practice extends beyond making artworks and exhibitions to include public interventions and architectural projects.” — Guggenheim Museum Bilbao

092Galleries Eliasson

Olafur Eliasson. Beauty, 1993. Spotlight, water, nozzles, wood, hose, pump. Dimensions variable. Installation view: Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, 2020. Photo: Erika Ede. Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles © 1993 Olafur Eliasson

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Olafur Eliasson. Moss wall, 1994. Reindeer moss, wood, wire. Dimensions variable. Installation view: Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, 2020. Photo: Erika Ede. Courtesy of the artist; neugerriemschneider, Berlin; Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York / Los Angeles © 1994 Olafur Eliasson

102Galleries Eliasson

Olafur Eliasson. Room for one colour, 1997. Monofrequency lamps. Dimensions variable. Installation view: Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, 2020. Photo: Erika Ede. Courtesy of the artist; neugerriemschneider, Berlin; Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York / Los Angeles © 1997 Olafur Eliasson

009Galleries Eliasson

Olafur Eliasson. Model room, 2003. Wood table with steel legs, mixed media models, maquettes, prototypes. Dimension variable. Installation view: Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, 2020. Photo: Erika Ede. Moderna Museet, Stockholm. Purchase 2015 funded by The Anna-Stina Malmborg and Gunnar Höglund Foundation © 2003 Olafur Eliasson

148Galleries Eliasson

Olafur Eliasson. Your atmospheric colour atlas, 2009. Fluorescent lights, color filter foil (red, green, blue), aluminum, steel, ballasts, haze machine. Dimensions variable. Installation view: Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, 2020 ARoS Aarhus Kunstmuseum, Denmark © 2009 Olafur Eliasson

337Galleries Eliasson

Olafur Eliasson. Your uncertain shadow (colour), 2010. HMI lamps (green, orange, blue, magenta), glass, aluminium, transformers. Dimension variable. Installation view: Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, 2020. Photo: Erika Ede. Thyssen-Bornemisza Art Contemporary Collection, Vienna © 2010 Olafur Eliasson

271Galleries Eliasson

Olafur Eliasson. In real life, 2019. Aluminum, color-effect filter glass (green, yellow, orange, red, pink, cyan), bulb, LED light. Diameter 208 cm. Installation view: Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, 2020 Photo: Erika Ede. Courtesy of the artist; neugerriemschneider, Berlin; Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York / Los Angeles © 2019 Olafur Eliasson

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Olafur Eliasson. Big Bang Fountain, 2014. Water, strobe light, pump, nozzle, stainless steel, wood, foam, plastic, control unit, dye. 165 x 160 x 160 cm. Installation view: Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, 2020. Photo: Erika Ede. Courtesy of the artist; neugerriemschneider, Berlin; Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York/Los Angeles © 2014 Olafur Eliasson

274Galleries Eliasson

Olafur Eliasson. The glacier melt series, 1999/2019, 2019. 30 C-prints, each 31 x 91 x 2.4 cm. Installation view: Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, 2020. Photo: Erika Ede. Courtesy of the artist; neugerriemschneider, Berlin; Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York / Los Angeles © 2019 Olafur Eliasson

358Galleries Eliasson

Olafur Eliasson. The presence of absence pavilion, 2019. Bronze, 200 x 100 x 100 cm. Installation view: Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, 2020. Photo: Erika Ede. Courtesy of the artist; neugerriemschneider, Berlin; Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York / Los Angeles © 2019 Olafur Eliasson

045Galleries Eliasson

Olafur Eliasson. Waterfall, 2019. Scaffolding, water, wood, plastic sheet, aluminium, pump, hose. Height 11 metres; diameter 12 metres. Installation view: Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, 2020. Photo: Erika Ede. Courtesy of the artist; neugerriemschneider, Berlin; Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York / Los Angeles © 2019 Olafur Eliasson

Olafur Eliasson

Olafur Eliasson. Photo: Runa Maya Mørk Huber / Studio Olafur Eliasson © 2017 Olafur Eliasson

Olafur Eliasson: In Real Life was organized by the Tate Modern in collaboration with the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao. It was curated by Mark Godfrey, Senior Curator, International Art, Tate Modern, and Lucía Agirre, Curator, Guggenheim Museum Bilbao.

Images courtesy Guggenheim Museum Bilbao.

Willi Smith: Street Couture at Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, through October 25, 2020*

“Founder of the iconic brand WilliWear, Smith aimed to democratize fashion through affordable styles that could be worn across seasons. Quality of materials, durability and craftsmanship were paramount to the brand. His clothes moved from the office to the dance floor, blending exaggerated shoulders with harem pants, layering color and pattern, and blurring gender boundaries. WilliWear’s collaborations with Christo and Jeanne Claude, Nam June Paik, Bill T. Jones and Arnie Zane, Dan Friedman, SITE and many more aimed to bring avant-garde art and design to the everyday consumer.

The exhibition features key works by this pioneer of streetwear fashion and explores Smith’s efforts to champion inclusive fashion and lifestyle through innovative partnerships with artists, designers and performers.” — Cooper Hewitt

“Cooper Hewitt’s team realized early on in our research that while the depth of Willi Smith’s story may be missing from the history books, it is vividly alive in the minds of his family, friends, collaborators and admirers,” said Alexandra Cunningham Cameron, curator of contemporary design and Hintz Secretarial Scholar at Cooper Hewitt. “Smith’s community revealed to us that he was more than a designer—he was an activist, an entrepreneur, a cultural catalyst and a confidant. This digital archive extends an open invitation to the public to rectify history by taking an active role in shaping an understanding of Smith’s influence.”

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Installation view of “Willi Smith: Street Couture.” Photo: Ann Sunwoo © Smithsonian Institution

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Installation view of “Willi Smith: Street Couture.” Photo: Ann Sunwoo © Smithsonian Institution

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Installation view of “Willi Smith: Street Couture.” Photo: Ann Sunwoo © Smithsonian Institution

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Installation view of “Willi Smith: Street Couture.” Photo: Ann Sunwoo © Smithsonian Institution

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Installation view of “Willi Smith: Street Couture.” Photo: Ann Sunwoo © Smithsonian Institution

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Installation view of “Willi Smith: Street Couture.” Photo: Ann Sunwoo © Smithsonian Institution

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Installation view of “Willi Smith: Street Couture.” Photo: Ann Sunwoo © Smithsonian Institution

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Installation view of “Willi Smith: Street Couture.” Photo: Ann Sunwoo © Smithsonian Institution

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Installation view of “Willi Smith: Street Couture.” Photo: Ann Sunwoo © Smithsonian Institution

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Installation view of “Willi Smith: Street Couture.” Photo: Ann Sunwoo © Smithsonian Institution

Willi Wear Showroom

WilliWear Showoom, SITE, 1982, Photographed by Andreas Sterzing, Courtesy of SITE – James Wines, LLC, photo © Andreas Sterzing

Willi Smith, ca. 1981, Courtesy of Kim Steele

Willi Smith, ca. 1981, Courtesy of Kim Steele

“Willi Smith: Street Couture” is organized by Alexandra Cunningham Cameron, along with curatorial assistants Darnell-Jamal Lisby and Julie Pastor.

Images courtesy Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum.

*PLEASE NOTE: Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum is temporarily closed to the public.

Phyllis Galembo: Maske at Boca Raton Museum of Art, through September 20, 2020*

“These images are nearly life-size and explore spiritual realms of these masquerade cultures with brilliant, mesmerizing colors. For more than 30 years, Phyllis Galembo has travelled around the world to photograph participants in contemporary mask-making and masquerade events that range from traditional religious ceremonies to secular celebrations.

Galembo’s portraits are celebrated by the world’s leading fine art photography editors for their stunning resonance. Through her lens, the viewer gains special access to these rarely seen other-worlds as she captures the raw and sometimes frightening aspects of masks and ceremonial garb. She has made over twenty trips to sites of ritual masquerades, capturing cultural performances with a subterranean edge. The masking seen through her photographs is a complex, mysterious, and profound tradition in which the participants transcend the physical world and enter the spiritual realm.” ― Boca Raton Museum of Art 

“I like the way viewers can grasp the real stories behind each image. Every mask, costume and fiber of material can represent so much to the people in these portraits,” adds Galembo. “Many of these subjects created these ritual costumes because a spirit inspired them. These are people who make masks and costumes that are very spiritually motivated,” says Galembo. 

Agot Dance Group by Phyllis Galembo

Agot Dance Group, Etikpe Village, Cross River, Nigeria 2004 Ilfochrome

Otoghe-Toghe by Phyllis Galembo

Otoghe-Toghe, Aromgba Village, Nigeria 2005 Ilfochrome

Banana Leaf Masquerade by Phyllis Galembo

Banana Leaf Masquerade, EkongIkon Ukom, Calabar, Nigeria 2005 Ilfochrome

Ekpeyong Edet by Phyllis Galembo

Ekpeyong Edet Dance Group, Nigeria 2005 Ilfochrome

Ekpo by Phyllis Galembo

Ekpo, Calabar, Nigeria 2005 Ilfochrome

Affianwan by Phyllis Galembo

Affianwan, Calibar South, Nigeria 2005 Ilfochrome

Jaguar Style or Ekong-Itaghafon by Phyllis Galembo

Jaguar style or Ekong-Itaghafon, Calabar, Nigeria 2005 Ilfochrome

by PhyllisGalembo'

Akata Dance Masqueraders, Ogoja, Nigeria 2004 Ilfochrome

Akata Dance by Phyllis Galembo

Akata Dance Masquerade, Cross River, Nigeria 2004 Ilfochrome

You Can't Buy Wisdom at the Market by Phyllis Galembo

You Can’t Buy Wisdom at the Market, Benin 2006 Ilfochrome

Aye Loja Gelede Masquerade by Phyllis Galembo

Aye Loja (The World is a Market Place that we Visit), Gelede Masquerade, Agonli Village, Benin 2006 Ilfochrome

Ringo (Big Deer) by Phyllis Galembo

Ringo (Big Deer) Masquerade, Kroo Bay, Sierra Leone 2008 Ilfochrome

Two in a Fancy Dress by Phyllis Galembo

Two in a Fancy Dress, Red Cross Masquerade Group, Winneba, Ghana 2010 Ilfochrome

Apprentice Tailor, 2006

Egungun, Adandokpodji Village, Benin 2006 Ilfochrome

Awo-O-Dudu by Phyllis Galembo

Awo-O-Dudu (A Spirit They Saw), Freetown, Sierra Leone 2008 Ilfochrome

“For many people all over the world now, creating and wearing masks feels like a way they can reclaim some personal power,” said Phyllis Galembo. “Protective face masks aren’t just medical anymore, we can see on social media how they are becoming a part of fashion, of our cultural landscape. Ways that people can convey messages and reflect their own personality.”

As a new wave of mask-making creativity takes hold, Boca Raton Museum of Art education team has created new digital pathways for the public to enjoy online. These include mask-related online activities for families who are still at home, and video gallery tours for all ages.

Images courtesy Boca Raton Museum of Art.

*PLEASE NOTE: Boca Raton Museum of Art will reopen to the public on Wednesday, June 3. The museum offers free admission to all guests through September of this year, as a special way to give back to the community.