Pierre Cardin: Future Fashion at Brooklyn Museum, July 20, 2019 – January 5, 2020

Pierre Cardin: Future Fashion traces the legendary career of one of the fashion world’s most innovative designers, one whose futuristic designs and trailblazing efforts to democratize high fashion for the masses pushed the boundaries of the industry for more than seven decades. The retrospective exhibition features over 170 objects that date from the 1950s to the present, including haute couture and ready-to-wear garments, accessories, photographs, film, and other materials drawn primarily from the Pierre Cardin archive. Pierre Cardin: Future Fashion, curated by Matthew Yokobosky, Senior Curator of Fashion and Material Culture, Brooklyn Museum, will reveal how the designer’s bold, futuristic aesthetic had a pervasive influence not only on fashion, but on other forms of design that extended beyond clothing to furniture, industrial design, and more.

Pierre Cardin (French, b. 1922) is best known for his avant-garde Space Age designs and pioneering advances in ready-to-wear and unisex fashion. Cardin’s fascination with new technologies and the international fervor of the 1960s Space Race visibly influenced his couture apparel, which subsequently became emblematic of the era. His clothing designs, which featured geometric silhouettes and were often made from unconventional materials, were worn by international models and film stars from Brigitte Bardot and Lauren Bacall to Alain Delon, Jacqueline Kennedy, and Raquel Welch. Fueled by an appetite for experimentation and ‘breaking the mold,’ he was one of the first European designers to show in Japan, China, and Vietnam and license his name, using it to brand an expansive line of products on a global scale.” — Brooklyn Museum

Photographs by Corrado Serra.

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“Throughout his decades-long career, Pierre Cardin has proved to be a master tailor and designer, as well as an intuitive businessman,” says Matthew Yokobosky, Senior Curator of Fashion and Material Culture, Brooklyn Museum. “He truly is a twentieth-century renaissance man whose work has advanced fashion and design while continuously giving society a new and breathtaking vision of what the future might look like.”

Beyond The Streets New York, at Twenty Five Kent, North Williamsburg, Brooklyn, through August 2019

Beyond The Streets is the premier exhibition of graffiti, street art and beyond. The show celebrates society’s most pervasive mark makers and rule breakers with a sprawling showcase of work by more than 150 artists from around the world. The exhibition is comprised of more than 100,000 square feet of space and features programming including performances, lectures and films.

Curated by graffiti historian and urban anthropologist Roger Gastman, Beyond The Streets examines the fundamental human need for public self-expression, highlighting artists with roots in graffiti and street art whose work has evolved into highly disciplined studio practices, alongside important cultural figures inspired by these art forms. For New York, the travelling art experience takes an expanded look at the role of music and the theme of artist activism.

Photos by Dan Bradica.

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KATSU

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TATS CRU

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HuskMitNavn

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POSE

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DABSMYLA

BTS_096 FUTURA 2000

FUTURA 2000

BTS_099 C.R. Stecyk III

C.R. Stecyk III

BTS_107 Trashed Records installation

Trashed Records installation

BTS_134 Paul Insect _ BAST

Paul Insect

BTS_141 Bill Barminski

Bill Barminski

BTS_143 Kenny Scharf

Kenny Scharf

BTS_146 Bert Krak _ Alexis Ross

Bert Krak – Alexis Ross

BTS_147 Barry McGee

Barry McGee

BTS_152 Alicia McCarthy

Alicia McCarthy

BTS_158 Beastie Boys exhibit

Beastie Boys exhibit

BTS_162 Rammellzee

Rammellzee

BTS_Craig Costello

Craig Costello

BTS_INVADER, Shepard Fairey, 1UP Crew

INVADER, Shepard Fairey, 1UP Crew

BTS_Shepard Fairey, Cleon Peterson, Conor Harrington

Shepard Fairey, Cleon Peterson, Conor Harrington

Beyond The Streets is curated by Roger Gastman; co-curated by Sacha Jenkins SHR, Evan Pricco and David CHINO Villorente, and produced by Ian Mazie & Pressure Point Creative.

The travelling exhibition “Prête-moi ton rêve” (Lend me Your Dream) opened in Casablanca on June 18, 2019 and closes in Marrakesh in 2020

“The Fondation pour le Développement de la Culture Contemporaine Africaine (FDCCA) organised a major travelling exhibition entitled “Prête-moi ton rêve” (Lend me Your Dream) which opens in Casablanca on 18 June 2019. The exhibition brings together some thirty world famous African artists of 15 different nationalities and will visit 6 countries across the continent. After Casablanca, the group show will travel to Dakar, Abidjan, Lagos, Addis Ababa and Cape Town over a period of twelve months, rather like a cultural caravan representing contemporary African art. It will close in Marrakesh in 2020.

This first ambitious project brins together more than 100 previously unseen creations produced by the artists during residencies prior to the event, together with some of their most iconic pieces. The travelling exhibition is a reflection of the abundance and vitality of the African art scene. It aims to increase the international visibility of local contemporary artists, to give rise to a pan-African circuit of cultural distribution and to foster dialogue and exchange between established and emerging artists.” — FDCCA

1. Olu AmodaFCCD © Fouad MAAZOUZ-60

Olu Amoda, Red Nest, 2018. Photo © Fouad Maazouz

1. Mahi BinebineJ 6 LMDA ©MAAZOUZ-39

Mahi Binebine, Sans titre, 2015. Photo © Fouad Maazouz

2. Zoulikha BouabdellahFCCD © Fouad MAAZOUZ-58

Zoulikha Bouabdellah, Mirages suspendus, 2019. Photo © Fouad Maazouz

3. Meriem BouderbalaFCCD 2 © Fouad MAAZOUZ-3

Meriem Bouderbala, Scars II. Photo © Fouad Maazouz

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Soly Cissé, Comme des héros, 2018. Photo © Fouad Maazouz

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Viyé Diba, Illusion, 2018. Photo © Fouad Maazouz

7. FM-5 copie.jpg Jems Koko bi Les Homme de cédre

Jems Koko Bi, Les Hommes de cèdre, 2018. Photo © Fouad Maazouz

7. FM-12.jpg Abdoulaye Konate

Abdoulaye Konaté, Rouge touareg n°1, 2018. Photo © Fouad Maazouz

Siriki Ky test copie

Siriki Ky, Têtes précieuses, 2019. Photo © Fouad Maazouz

8. Vitshois Mwilambwe Bondocv dfc-© MAAZOUZ

Vitshois Mwilambwe Bondo, La reine Rwej (mère symbolique de l’Empire lunda), 2019. Photo © Fouad Maazouz

13. nnena Okoré FCCD © Fouad MAAZOUZ-11

Nnenna Okoré, Earthbound. Photo © Fouad Maazouz

Yazid Oulab FCCD 2 © Fouad MAAZOUZ-8

Yazid Oulab, Sans titre, 2019. Photo © Fouad Maazouz

9. Chéri Samba c dfc-© MAAZOUZ-2

Chéri Samba, Le secret d’un petit poisson devenu grand. Photo © Fouad Maazouz

FCCD 2 © Fouad MAAZOUZ-9

Kofi Setordji, Dialogue, 2018. Photo © Fouad Maazouz

12. Fathiya Tahiri FCCD 2 © Fouad MAAZOUZ-5

Fathiya Tahiri, La Fourmi, 2019. Photo © Fouad Maazouz

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Barthélémy Toguo, Homo planta II, 2018. Photo © Fouad Maazouz

13. Freddy Tsimba FCCD © Fouad MAAZOUZ-64

Freddy Tsimba, Les Amants du fort de Romainville, 2018. Photo © Fouad Maazouz

14. Ouattara Watts FCCD 2 © Fouad MAAZOUZ-10

Ouattara Watts, Sans Titre, 2018. Photo © Fouad Maazouz

Fatiha Zemmouri FCCD © Fouad MAAZOUZ-54.jpg Zemouri Dyptique

Fatiha Zemmouri, Floating sea weed, 2019. Photo © Fouad Maazouz

“Prête-moi ton rêve” shows the work of the following artists: Jane Alexander, Olu Amoda, El Anatsui, Fouad Bellamine, Mahi Bine Bine, Zoulikha Bouabdelah, Meriem Bouderbala, Soly Cissé, Viyé Diba, Adel El Siwi, William Kentridge, Jems Koko Bi, Abdoulaye Konaté, Bill Kouelany, Siriki Ky, Mohamed Melehi, Vitshois Mwilambwe Bondo, Nenna Okoré, Mohammed Omar Khalil, Yazid Oulab, Chéri Samba, Kofi Sétordji, Joseph Sumégné, Fathiya Tahiri, Barthélémy Toguo, Freddy Tsimba, Ouattara Watts, Fatiha Zemmouri, Dominique Zinkpé.

The exhibition was curated by Yacouba Konaté, general curator and Brahim Alaoui, Artistic curator.

Title image: Photo © Fouad Maazouz.

Images courtesy Fondation pour le Développement de la Culture Contemporaine Africaine.

Filed under: Art

Nespolo fuori dal coro at Palazzo Reale, Milan, July 6 – September 15, 2019

“Articulated like a journey, the extraordinary exhibition dedicated to Ugo Nespolo tells the story of an artist who in his multiform evolutions has marked important stages in the history of the Italian art.

Rich with a constant sense of intolerance towards the obligations of creative and critical conformism, Nespolo has in fact given life to a unique and original artist figure made up of culture and irony, skilfully mixing the high and low of his ‘do’ artistic and pursuing a constant and serious reflection on art.

The exhibition presents around two hundred works that exemplify Nespolo’s multiform creative research and a particular attention to materials: from wood to metals, from ceramics to glass.” — Palazzo Reale

1. Nespolo MOLOTOV12

MOLOTOV, Galleria Il Punto, Torino, 1968. Wood and bottles, 600 x 200 x 150 cm

4. Nespolo IPOTESI DIALETTICA

IPOTESI DIALETTICA (Dialectic Hypothesis), 1973. Painted papier mache

10. Nespolo WINDOW POEM

WINDOW POEM, 1984. Acrilic on wood, 170 x 220 cm

15. Nespolo SENZA TITOLO

SENZA TITOLO (Untitled) ,1967. Wood, nitre and metal, 25 x 30 x 30 cm

16. Nespolo GENTLEMEN'S AGREEMENT

GENTLEMEN’S AGREEMENT, 1978. Wood and silver, 79 x 40 cm

18. Nespolo LA FONTANA MALATA

LA FONTANA MALATA (The Sick Fountain), 1996. Acrilic on molded wood, 150 x diam 120 cm

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L’elisir d’amore di Gaetano Donizetti, scene e costume, 1995. Acrilici su legno, bozzetto per scenografia

24. Nespolo LETTERATURA

LETTERATURA (Literature), 1989. Painted majolica, 35 x diam 50 cm

25. Nespolo ESTATE BERLINESE

ESTATE BERLINESE (Berlin Summer), 2003. Glass, 73 x 32 x 15 cm

27. Nespolo ORIENTE

ORIENTE (Orient), 2005. Glass, 36,5 x 23 x 10 cm

The exhibition, curated by Maurizio Ferraris, is promoted and produced by the Municipality of Milan – Culture, Palazzo Reale and Studio Nespolo and created thanks to the Bracco Foundation, the main sponsor of the project, with the organizational support of Skira, publisher of the catalog.

Images courtesy Skira and Palazzo Reale.

By the Light of the Silvery Moon: A Century of Lunar Photographs at National Gallery of Art, Washington, July 14, 2019 – January 5, 2020

“The year 2019 marks the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing on July 20, 1969. From the moment photography was introduced in 1839, photographers dreamt about harnessing the potential of photography together with the telescope. While astronomers had earlier mapped many of the moon’s visible features through the telescope, the first photographs revealing the lunar landscape were successfully achieved by the 1850s. Throughout the latter half of the 19th century and into the 20th, numerous photographers created uncannily beautiful lunar pictures that captured the public imagination. By the Light of the Silvery Moon: A Century of Lunar Photographs presents some 50 works, from the 19th century to the “space-age” 1960s, that merged art with science and transformed the way that we envision and comprehend the cosmos.” — National Gallery of Art

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Warren de la Rue. Full Moon, 1858–1859. Stereoscopic glass transparency, printed 1862. Overall: 8.3 x 17.2 cm (3 1/4 x 6 3/4 in.). Image (each): 5.8 cm (2 5/16 in.) diameter. National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of Mary and Dan Solomon

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Lewis M. Rutherfurd. View of the Moon, 1860. Stereoscopic albumen print. Image/sheet: 7.9 x 15 cm (3 1/8 x 5 7/8 in.), mount: 8.8 x 17.6 cm (3 7/16 x 6 15/16 in.). National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of Mary and Dan Solomon

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Lewis M. Rutherfurd. Full Moon, 1864. Stereoscopic albumen print. Image/sheet: 7.5 x 14.6 cm (2 15/16 x 5 3/4 in.), mount: 8.5 x 17.5 cm (3 3/8 x 6 7/8 in.). National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of Mary and Dan Solomon

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John Payson Soule. Full Moon, 1863. Stereoscopic albumen print. Image/sheet: 7.6 x 15.3 cm (3 x 6 in.), mount: 8.2 x 17.3 cm (3 1/4 x 6 13/16 in.). National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of Mary and Dan Solomon

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Henry Draper. Full Moon, 1860. Stereoscopic albumen prints. Image/sheet: 7.9 x 14.8 cm (3 1/8 x 5 13/16 in.), mount: 8.8 x 17.8 cm (3 7/16 x 7 in.). National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of Mary and Dan Solomon

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Keystone View Company. The Full Moon. Yerkes Observatory., after 1897. Stereoscopic albumen prints. Image/sheet: 7.7 x 15.2 cm (3 1/16 x 6 in.), mount: 8.8 x 17.8 cm (3 7/16 x 7 in.). National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of Mary and Dan Solomon

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Loewy et Puiseux. Photographie Lunaire Rayonnement de Tycho – Phase Croissante, 1899. Photogravure. Image: 57.15 x 46.67 cm (22 1/2 x 18 3/8 in.), sheet: 79.53 x 60.01 cm (31 5/16 x 23 5/8 in.). National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of Mary and Dan Solomon and Patrons’ Permanent Fund

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Charles le Morvan. Carte photographique de la lune, planche XIII.A (Photographic Chart of the Moon, plate XIII.A), October 23, 1902. Photogravure, printed 1914. Image: 31.1 x 25.5 cm (12 1/4 x 10 1/16 in.), plate: 38.9 x 29.5 cm (15 5/16 x 11 5/8 in.), sheet: 49 x 37.9 cm (19 5/16 x 14 15/16 in.). National Gallery of Art, Washington, Pepita Milmore Memorial Fund

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Charles le Morvan. Carte photographique de la lune, planche XXIII.A (Photographic Chart of the Moon, plate XXIII.A), August 27, 1902. Photogravure, printed 1914. Image: 31.1 x 25.5 cm (12 1/4 x 10 1/16 in.), plate: 38.9 x 29.5 cm (15 5/16 x 11 5/8 in.), sheet: 49 x 37.9 cm (19 5/16 x 14 15/16 in.). National Gallery of Art, Washington, Pepita Milmore Memorial Fund

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Charles le Morvan. Carte photographique de la lune, planche XXIV.A (Photographic Chart of the Moon, plate XXIV.A), December 26, 1907. Photogravure, printed 1914. Image: 31.1 x 25.5 cm (12 1/4 x 10 1/16 in.), plate: 38.9 x 29.5 cm (15 5/16 x 11 5/8 in.), sheet: 49 x 37.9 cm (19 5/16 x 14 15/16 in.). National Gallery of Art, Washington, Pepita Milmore Memorial Fund

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National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Ranger IX, A-16, 1965. Gelatin silver print. Image: 19 x 19.5 cm (7 1/2 x 7 11/16 in.), sheet: 35 x 27.3 cm (13 3/4 x 10 3/4 in.). National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of Mary and Dan Solomon

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National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Lunar Orbiter, Medium Resolution, LOIV M-082, 1967. Gelatin silver print, printed June 13, 1967. Image: 49.5 x 43 cm (19 1/2 x 16 15/16 in.), sheet: 56 x 45.4 cm (22 1/16 x 17 7/8 in.). National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of Mary and Dan Solomon

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National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Lunar Orbiter, Medium Resolution, LOIV M-187, 1967. Gelatin silver print. Image: 32 x 45 cm (12 5/8 x 17 11/16 in.), sheet: 53.5 x 45 cm (21 1/16 x 17 11/16 in.). National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of Mary and Dan Solomon

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National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Surface of the Moon, July 1969. Stereoscopic glass transparency slide. Plate (each): 2.4 x 2.7 cm (15/16 x 1 1/16 in.), mount: 4 x 10.1 x 0.3 cm (1 9/16 x 4 x 1/8 in.). National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of Mary and Dan Solomon

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National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Earthrise across Mare Smythii, July 16–24, 1969. Chromogenic print. Image: 18.1 x 18.1 cm (7 1/8 x 7 1/8 in.), sheet: 20 x 25.3 cm (7 7/8 x 9 15/16 in.). National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of Mary and Dan Solomon

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Neil Armstrong, National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Buzz Aldrin Poses with Flag, July 20, 1969. Chromogenic print. Image: 18.2 x 18.2 cm (7 3/16 x 7 3/16 in.), sheet: 25.2 x 20.4 cm (9 15/16 x 8 1/16 in.). National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of Mary and Dan Solomon

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National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin Deploy Flag on the Moon, July 20, 1969. Chromogenic print. Image: 18.3 x 24 cm (7 3/16 x 9 7/16 in.), sheet: 20 x 25.2 cm (7 7/8 x 9 15/16 in.). National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of Mary and Dan Solomon

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Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Buzz Aldrin’s Footprint, July 20, 1969. Gelatin silver print. Image: 19 x 24 cm (7 1/2 x 9 7/16 in.), sheet: 20.2 x 25.3 cm (7 15/16 x 9 15/16 in.). National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of Mary and Dan Solomon

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William Paul Taub, National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Celebration after Apollo 11 made flawless splashdown, July 24, 1969. Gelatin silver print. Image/sheet: 17.4 x 24.3 cm (6 7/8 x 9 9/16 in.). National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of Mary and Dan Solomon

By the Light of the Silvery Moon is organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington. The exhibition is curated by Diane Waggoner, curator of 19th-century photographs.

Images courtesy National Gallery of Art, Washington.

Lubaina Himid, Mika Rottenberg and Diedrick Brackens at New Museum, Summer 2019

Photographs by Corrado Serra.

“Lubaina Himid: Work from Underneath”, June 26 to October 6, 2019

The New Museum debuts an entirely new body of work by Turner Prize–winning British artist Lubaina Himid (b. 1954, Zanzibar), marking the artist’s first solo museum exhibition in the United States. A pioneer of the British Black Arts Movement of the 1980s and ’90s, Himid has long championed marginalized histories. Her drawings, paintings, sculptures, and textile works critique the consequences of colonialism and question the invisibility of people of color in art and the media. While larger historical narratives are often the driving force behind her images and installations, Himid’s works beckon viewers by attending to the unmonumental details of daily life.

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Old Boat / New Money, 2019.

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Left: Old Boat / New Money, 2019. Right: Metal Handkerchief series, 2019

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Series Metal Handkerchief, 2019

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Left: Close Up – Materials for Change, 2019. Right: Six Tailors, 2019.

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Left: Three Architects, 2019. Right: Close Up – Ideas for Development, 2019

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Left: Close Up – Ideas for Development, 2019. Right: Shopping for a Loaf Tin, 2019

Lubaina Himid: Work from Underneath is curated by Natalie Bell, Associate Curator.

“Mika Rottenberg: Easypieces”, June 26 to September 15, 2019

This exhibition marks the first New York solo museum presentation of work by New York–based artist Mika Rottenberg (b. 1976, Buenos Aires, Argentina). “Mika Rottenberg: Easypieces” takes its title from the book Six Easy Pieces (1994), in which theoretical physicist Richard Feynman introduces the fundamentals of physics to general audiences. Rottenberg’s exhibition likewise considers our relationship to the material world, while questioning human attempts to control or explain the inexplicable. Her investigations reveal the unseen connections between the basic or “easy” items that we manipulate and consume almost without thinking—from luxury goods and plastic objects to emails, Bitcoin, and particle beams—and matters of the universe beyond our control.

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Ponytail (Orange), 2016. Hair and mechanical system

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Lips (Study #3), 2016/2019. Single-channel video installation, sound, color; 1:28 min

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Frying Pans (duo), 2019

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Installation view

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Front: Ceiling Fan Composition, 2016. Back: Video

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Installation view

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Installation view

Mika Rottenberg: Easypieces is curated by Margot Norton, Curator.

“Diedrick Brackens: darling divined”, June 4 to September 19, 2019

For the artist’s first institutional solo exhibition in New York, Brackens presents a new installation of weavings in the New Museum’s Lobby Gallery. Diedrick Brackens (b. 1989, Mexia, TX) constructs intricately woven textiles that speak to the complexities of black and queer identity in the United States. Interlacing diverse traditions, including West African weaving, European tapestries, and quilting from the American south, Brackens creates cosmographic abstractions and figurative narratives that lyrically merge lived experience, commemoration, and allegory.

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Far left: the flame goes, 2017. Left: in the valley, 2017. Right: the cup is a cloud, 2018

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Left: in the decadence of silence, 2018. Right: bitter attendance, drown jubilee, 2018

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Center: break and tremble, 2019 

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Left: demigod, 2019. Right: opening tombs beneath the heart, 2018

Diedrick Brackens: darling divined is curated by Margot Norton, Curator, and Francesca Altamura, Curatorial Assistant.

Text courtesy new Museum.

Order of Imagination: The Photographs of Olivia Parker at Peabody Essex Museum (PEM), July 13 – November 11, 2019

“For more than 40 years, Olivia Parker (b. 1941) has used photography to explore the relationships between vision, knowledge, and the natural world. From deceptively simple still lifes that transform the commonplace to her most recent work exploring memory loss, Order of Imagination: The Photographs of Olivia Parker features more than 100 intricately composed photographs that reflect the artist’s wide creative range and unflagging curiosity. This is the first exhibition to present a comprehensive retrospective of Parker’s extensive career.

A highly-celebrated and acclaimed photographer, Olivia Parker’s work is represented in major collections, including the Art Institute of Chicago, the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, the George Eastman Museum, and PEM. Originally trained as a painter, the Massachusetts-based artist notes that she is drawn to photography for its ability to create a controlled dialogue between nature and abstraction, permanence and ephemerality, and for its ability to use light to sculpt form and define space.” — Peabody Essex Museum

Cinquefoil

Olivia Parker, Cinquefoil, 1975, printed 1977. Gelatin silver print. © Olivia Parker

Pheasant

Olivia Parker, Pheasant, 1976. Gelatin silver print. © Olivia Parker

Evidence

Olivia Parker, Evidence, 1977. Gelatin silver print. © Olivia Parker

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Olivia Parker, Orchids from the Ephemera Portfolio, 1977. Gelatin silver print. © Olivia Parker

OP-016

Olivia Parker, Interior with Pears, 1979. Gelatin silver print. © Olivia Parker

Child

Olivia Parker, Child, 1980. Dye diffusion print. © Olivia Parker

Eggs

Olivia Parker, Eggs, 2005. Inkjet print. © Olivia ParkerOlivia

Wing 1

Olivia Parker, Wing 1, 2008. Inkjet print. © Olivia Parker

A Book of Curses

Olivia Parker, A Book of Curses, 2008. Inkjet print. © Olivia Parker

Shell in a Landscape

Olivia Parker, Shell in a Landscape, 2011. Inkjet print. © Olivia Parker

Honeymoon

Olivia Parker, Honeymoon, 2016. Inkjet print. © Olivia Parker

Nattering Things

Olivia Parker, Nattering Things, 2016. Inkjet print. © Olivia Parker

Franz Franken II, Oil on Copper; 1625

Olivia Parker, Frans Francken II, Oil on Copper; 1625, 2017. Inkjet print. © Olivia Parker

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Portrait of Olivia Parker. © Peabody Essex Museum. Photography by Bob Packert.

“It is always a gratifying and wonderful journey to be able to look at an artist’s whole career,” says Sarah Kennel, PEM’s Byrne Family Curator of Photography. “In the case of Parker’s work, it’s been a great privilege to understand the way she lives and how impacted she is by her environment–the items that she collects, how light and shadow play in her studio, how her wit and understated humor infuse her work. When you begin to unlock these pictures, you discover all of these ways in which she is making little visual jokes and word plays to further enliven the work and reward close reading.”

Images courtesy Peabody Essex Museum.

Mark Morris Dance Group, Mostly Mozart Festival at Rose Theater, Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Frederick P. Rose Hall, July 10 – 13, 2019

Mark Morris returns to Mostly Mozart Festival with Sport a new dance work commissioned by Lincoln Center that illuminates the playful tapestry of sound of Satie’s Sports et divertissements. Then comes Empire Garden, an exploration of Ives’s lyrical and at times, whimsical Piano Trio. The performance culminates in a Morris masterwork, V, a triumphant and virtuosic piece set to Schumann’s exuberant piano quintet.

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V. London, 2001. Photo: Robbie Jack

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V. London, 2001. Photo: Robbie Jack

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V. London, 2001. Photo: Robbie Jack

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V. London, 2001. Photo: Robbie Jack

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Empire Garden. Mostly Mozart, 2009. Photo: Gene Schiavone

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Empire Garden. Mostly Mozart, 2009. Photo: Gene Schiavone

The ProgramSport (World premiere) Satie: Sports et divertissements. Empire Garden Ives: Trio for Violin, Cello, and Piano. Schumann: Piano Quintet in E-flat major

Mark Morris Dance Group: Mark Morris, choreographer. Colin Fowler, piano. Georgy Valtchev, violin. American String Quartet

Images courtesy Mark Morris and Lincoln Center.

Summer at LongHouse Reserve, through October 5, 2019

New artwork by Wendell Castle, Jun Kaneko, Will Ryman, Joseph Walsh and Young Jae Lee has been installed at LongHouse Reserve for their 2019 season. On June 22, LongHouse revealed two new site specific installations by Stephen Talasnik and Lawrence Weiner. This unique outdoor museum and arboreta is one of the most popular cultural destinations on the East End of Long Island.

LongHouse Reserve exemplifies living with art in all forms. Founded by Jack Lenor Larsen, its collections, gardens, sculpture and programs reflect world cultures and inspire a creative life. LongHouse Reserve is a 16-acre sculpture museum and garden located in East Hampton, NY. In addition to new works on loan, LongHouse Reserve’s permanent collection features pieces designed by prominent artists including Buckminster Fuller, Yoko Ono and Willem de Kooning amongst others.

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Wendell Castle, Grand Temptation (2014). Courtesy LongHouse Reserve © Richard Lewin

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Jun Kaneko, Dango, 1996

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Will Ryman, The LongHouse 6, 2019 © Richard Lewin

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Will Ryman, The LongHouse 6 (detail), 2019 © Richard Lewin

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Joseph Walsh, Enignum Shelf XXXVI, 2019. Ash. 188 x 110 x 17. Collection LongHouse Reserve. Gift of the artist, 2019

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Vessels by Young Jae Lee © Richard Lewin

StephenTalasnik

Stephen Talasnik, Echo, 2019 (concept sketch). Various dimensions. Bamboo. Courtesy of Stephen Talasnik; National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne

NGV Out Of Sight Exhibition

Installation view of Lawrence Weiner: OUT OF SIGHT at the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne. Courtesy of the artist © Lawrence Weiner. Photo: Wayne Taylor

NGV Out Of Sight Exhibition

Installation view of Lawrence Weiner: OUT OF SIGHT at the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne. Courtesy of the artist © Lawrence Weiner. Photo: Wayne Taylor

Images courtesy LongHouse Reserve.

LIFE: Six Women Photographers at New-York Historical Society, June 28 – October 6, 2019

“The New-York Historical Society is proud to present the work of six prominent women photographers, whose iconic work for LIFE magazine helped create modern photojournalism as it depicted a quickly-evolving world. On view in the Center for Women’s History’s Joyce B. Cowin Women’s History Gallery, the exhibition features more than 70 images by Margaret Bourke-White, Marie Hansen, Martha Holmes, Lisa Larsen, Nina Leen, and Hansel Mieth, who were among the few women photographers employed by LIFE between the late 1930s and the early 1970s.

For decades, Americans saw the world through the lens of the photographers at LIFE, the first magazine in the United States to tell stories with images rather than text. These innovative photo essays became the trademark of the publication. The exhibition provides context to this unique storytelling format through published and unpublished photographs, including vintage prints, copy prints, and contact sheets. Taken together with select items from the Time Inc. records, the photographs show the editing process behind the final, published stories that helped define the United States as a world power during what Luce called the ‘American Century.’ This is the first exhibition to focus on some of the women who worked on staff for LIFE.” — New-York Historical Society

FORT PECK DAM

Margaret Bourke-White, photograph from “Franklin Roosevelt’s Wild West,” LIFE, November 23, 1936 © LIFE Picture Collection, Meredith Corporation

2 Margaret Bourke-White - Wild West Nov 23 1936

Margaret Bourke-White, photograph from “Franklin Roosevelt’s Wild West,” LIFE, November 23, 1936 © LIFE Picture Collection, Meredith Corporation

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Hansel Mieth, photograph from “International Ladies’ Garment Workers: How a Great Union Works Inside and Out,” LIFE, August 1, 1938 © LIFE Picture Collection, Meredith Corporation. Image courtesy New-York Historical Society.

International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union (ILGWU)

Hansel Mieth, photograph from “International Ladies’ Garment Workers: How a Great Union Works Inside and Out,” LIFE, August 1, 1938 © LIFE Picture Collection, Meredith Corporation. Image courtesy New-York Historical Society.

5 Marie Hansen - The WAACs Sept 7 1942

Marie Hansen, photograph from “The WAACs,” LIFE, September 7, 1942 © LIFE Picture Collection, Meredith Corporation. Image courtesy New-York Historical Society.

WACs doing daily calisthenics exercises.

Marie Hansen, photograph from “The WAACs,” LIFE, September 7, 1942 © LIFE Picture Collection, Meredith Corporation. Image courtesy New-York Historical Society.

WOMAN'S DILEMMA

Nina Leen, photograph from “American Woman’s Dilemma,” LIFE, June 16, 1947 (similar frame published) © LIFE Picture Collection, Meredith Corporation. Image courtesy New-York Historical Society.

American Woman's Dilemma

Nina Leen, unpublished photograph from “American Woman’s Dilemma,” LIFE, June 16, 1947 © LIFE Picture Collection, Meredith Corporation. Image courtesy New-York Historical Society.

BILLY ECKSTINE

Martha Holmes, photograph from “Mr. B.,” LIFE, April 24, 1950 © LIFE Picture Collection, Meredith Corporation. Image courtesy New-York Historical Society.

BILLY ECKSTINE

Martha Holmes, photograph from “Mr. B.,” LIFE, April 24, 1950 © LIFE Picture Collection, Meredith Corporation. Image courtesy New-York Historical Society.

11 Lisa Larsen - Tito as Soviet Hero June 25 1956

Lisa Larsen, photograph from “Tito As Soviet Hero, How Times Have Changed!” LIFE, June 25, 1956 © LIFE Picture Collection, Meredith Corporation. Image courtesy New-York Historical Society.

12 Lisa Larsen - Tito as Soviet Hero June 25 1956

Lisa Larsen, unpublished photograph from “Tito as Soviet Hero, How Times Have Changed!” LIFE, June 25, 1956 © LIFE Picture Collection, Meredith Corporation. Image courtesy New-York Historical Society.

“These pioneering women photographers captured events international and domestic, wide-ranging and intimate, serious and playful,” said Dr. Louise Mirrer, president and CEO of the New-York Historical Society. “At the forefront of history, these photographers enabled the public ‘to see life; to see the world; to eyewitness great events,’ as LIFE founder and editor-in-chief, Henry Luce, described it. We are honored to highlight their work in our Center for Women’s History, where their contributions to photojournalism can shine.”

Title image by Corrado Serra for Arts Summary.

Marta Minujín: Menesunda Reloaded at New Museum, June 26 – September 29, 2019

“In 1965, at the Instituto Di Tella in Buenos Aires, Marta Minujín and Rubén Santantonín devised the now-legendary environment La Menesunda. This intricate labyrinth sought to provoke visitors and spur them into action, offering new modes of encounter with consumer culture, mass media, and urban life. While La Menesunda was created as a direct response to street life in Buenos Aires—the title is slang for a confusing situation—the work, alongside that of Christo, Allan Kaprow, Claes Oldenburg, Niki de Saint Phalle, and others, counts among the earliest large-scale environments made by artists, demonstrating how Minujín anticipated the contemporary obsession with participatory spaces, the lure of new pop-up museums, and the quest for an intensity of experience that defines social media today.

Occupying the Museum’s Third Floor, La Menesunda is composed of eleven distinct spaces through which visitors move, one at a time. Entering the work through a doorway in the shape of a human silhouette, visitors must then climb a set of stairs and proceed through a series of narrow hallways and staircases, discovering new spaces and situations intended to surprise and shock along the way. Moving through an environment simulating human intestines, a refrigerator, and the interior of a woman’s head, visitors encounter live performers and moving parts triggered by the visitors’ own actions; they emerge transformed by an encounter with unexpected textures, forms, and sensations. In 2015, the Museo de Arte Moderno de Buenos Aires presented a reconstruction of La Menesunda. The New Museum’s presentation of the work—titled Menesunda Reloaded—marks the second recreation of this installation, and its first-ever presentation in the US.” — New Museum

Photographs by Corrado Serra.

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Marta Minujín: Menesunda Reloaded is curated by Massimiliano Gioni, Edlis Neeson Artistic Director, and Helga Christoffersen, Associate Curator. 

La Menesunda is co-produced by the New Museum and the Museo de Arte Moderno de Buenos Aires.

Ginny Ruffner: Reforestation of the Imagination and Michael Sherrill Retrospective at Renwick Gallery, Smithsonian American Art Museum, June 28, 2019 – January 5, 2020

“This summer, the Smithsonian American Art Museum presents two exhibitions that highlight the beauty of nature through botanically inspired sculptures. Ginny Ruffner: Reforestation of the Imagination turns the Renwick Gallery into a post-apocalyptic scene where, upon viewing her hand-blown glass-stump sculptures through an augmented reality lens, holograms of fictional flora sprout and transform the space into a thriving oasis. Visitors can download the free app Reforestation on their phones or use the iPads in the gallery to bring this second reality to life.

Michael Sherrill Retrospective was organized by The Mint Museum. The presentation at SAAM’s Renwick Gallery includes more than seventy-five objects from Sherrill’s earliest teapots and functional clay vessels to his recent mixed-media sculptures inspired by the landscape outside his studio in the mountains of North Carolina. In his delicately rendered sculptures in clay, glass, and metal, he seeks to elicit a sense of wonder from viewers, and to make them see the natural world anew. Sherrill’s most recent work reveals his naturalist’s sensitivity to botanical wonders.” — Renwick Gallery

Ginny Ruffner: Reforestation of the Imagination

“This is nature reimagining itself. The imagination can’t be exterminated. It just recreates itself.” — Ginny Ruffner

1.Flapping Tulip

Ginny Ruffner with Grant Kirkpatrick, Liriodendrum plausus (Flapping tulip), 2017, holographic image. Courtesy Ruffner Studio.

5.Pear with Windows

Ginny Ruffner with Grant Kirkpatrick, Pyrus fenestrata (Pear with windows), 2017, holographic image. Courtesy Ruffner Studio.

7.Magnolia Gondola

Ginny Ruffner with Grant Kirkpatrick, Canna grandiflora (Magnolia gondola), 2017, holographic image. Courtesy Ruffner Studio.

Ginny Ruffner with Grant Kirkpatrick, Musa saponifica (Soapy muse), 2017, holographic image. Courtesy Ruffner Studio.

Ginny Ruffner with Grant Kirkpatrick, Musa saponifica (Soapy muse), 2017, holographic image. Courtesy Ruffner Studio.

12.Woodpecker Flower

Ginny Ruffner with Grant Kirkpatrick, Picus germinabunt (Woodpecker flower), 2017, holographic image. Courtesy Ruffner Studio.

13.Morning Glory With Paul Klee Leaf

Ginny Ruffner with Grant Kirkpatrick, Scandent vinea clayaria (Morning glory with Paul Klee leaf), 2017, holographic image. Courtesy Ruffner Studio.

14.Kandinsky Tulip

Ginny Ruffner with Grant Kirkpatrick, Tulipia kandinskiana torquem (Kandinsky tulip), 2017, holographic image. Courtesy Ruffner Studio.

15.Hummingbird Flower

Ginny Ruffner with Grant Kirkpatrick, Avem iridis illuricae (Hummingbird flower), 2017, holographic image. Courtesy Ruffner Studio.

16.Blue Purple Flowering Vine

Ginny Ruffner with Grant Kirkpatrick, Astromaria zentada lillium (Blue/purple flowering vine), 2017, holographic image. Courtesy Ruffner Studio.

18.Rose with Eyelashes

Ginny Ruffner with Grant Kirkpatrick, Rosa cilliabunda (Rose with eyelashes), 2017, holographic image. Courtesy Ruffner Studio.

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Ginny Ruffner with Grant Kirkpatrick, Avem iridis illuricae (Hummingbird flower), 2017, sculpture (handblown glass with acrylic paint tree rings), island (plywood, low-density foam, fiberglass, epoxy, sand, pebbles, and acrylic paint), and holographic image. Sculpture: 15 x 12 x 6 ½ in. Installation view at MadArt Studio, 2018. Courtesy Ruffner Studio. Photo by Ruffner Studio.

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Ginny Ruffner with Grant Kirkpatrick, Digitalis artherium (Double art flowers), 2017, sculpture (handblown glass with acrylic paint tree rings), island (plywood, low-density foam, fiberglass, epoxy, sand, pebbles, and acrylic paint), and holographic image. Sculpture: 9 x 13 x 11 ½ in. Installation view at MadArt Studio, 2018. Courtesy Ruffner Studio. Photo by Marge Levy.

Michael Sherrill Retrospective

TwoSidesofTea

Michael Sherrill. Two Sides of Tea, 1992, ceramic. Left: 16 1/8 x 18 ½ x 8 ¼ in. Right: 16 3/8 x 18 5/8 x 7 ½. Gift of MCI. 2001.89.5.1A-B and 2001.89.5.2A-B. Smithsonian American Art Museum.

StarBottles

Michael Sherrill, Star Bottles, 1997, white stoneware, barium glaze. Tallest: 29 x 9 x 6 in. Shortest: 19 ½ x 10 x 5in. Collection of the artist. Photo by Scott Allen

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Michael Sherrill, Yellowstone Rhododendron, 2000, porcelain, glaze, steel. 11.25 x 15 x 11 in. Smithsonian American Art Museum, gift of David and Clemmer Montague, in memory of her mother Beatrice Slaton and her brother Carson Slaton, Mississippi Gardeners, 2005.34.

Stormy Rhododendron

Michael Sherrill, Stormy Rhododendron, 2005, porcelain, abraded glaze, forged steel. 16 x 17 x 14 in. Collection of Larry Brady. Photo by Tim Barnwell.

Yucca Temple of the Cool Beauty

Michael Sherrill, Temple of the Cool Beauty (Yucca), 2005, porcelain, Moretti glass, silica bronze. 54 x 38 in. Gift of Ann and Tom Cousins. 2014.78a-b. Collection of The Mint Museum.

MaysApples

Michael Sherrill, May’s Apples, 2006, porcelain, abraded glaze, steel. Left: 16 x 15 x 8 in. Right: 16 x 11 x 5 in. Collection of the artist. Photo by Scott Allen

Julesvernium

Michael Sherrill, Julesvernium (Seaflower), 2008, colored laminated porcelain, silica bronze, Moretti glass. 43 x 20 x 11 ½ in. Collection of Mark Parker.

BlackMedicine

Michael Sherrill, Black Medicine, 2014, silica bronze, Moretti glass. 38 x 34 x 20 in. Collection of Fleur Bresler. Photo by Scott Allen.

Dutch Solomon

Michael Sherrill, Dutch Solomon, 2015, porcelain, silica bronze, glass. 12 x 27 x 8 in. John Michael Kohler Arts Center, gift of the artist, 2015.022.001. Photo by Scott Allen.

Remnant

Michael Sherrill, Remnant, 2016, porcelain, silica bronze. 48 x 34 x 12 in. Private collection. Photo by Scott Allen.

ABeautifulDeath

Michael Sherrill, A Beautiful Death, 2017, porcelain, silica bronze, Moretti glass. 47 x 25 x 22 in. Collection of the artist. Photo by Scott Allen.