Lives of the Gods: Divinity in Maya Art at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, November 21, 2022 – April 2, 2023 

“In Maya art—one of the greatest artistic traditions of the ancient Americas—the gods are depicted in all stages of life: as infants, as adults at the peak of their maturity and influence, and finally, as they age. The gods could perish, and some were born anew, providing a model of regeneration and resilience. Opening November 21, 2022, at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, the exhibition Lives of the Gods: Divinity in Maya Art will bring together nearly 100 rarely seen masterpieces and recent discoveries in diverse media—from the monumental to the miniature—that depict episodes in the life cycle of the gods, from the moment of their birth to resplendent transformations as blossoming flowers or fearsome creatures of the night. Created by masters of the Classic period (A.D. 250–900) in the spectacular royal cities in the tropical forests of what is now Guatemala, Honduras, and Mexico, these landmark works evoke a world in which the divine, human, and natural realms are interrelated and intertwined. Lenders include major museum collections in Europe, Latin America, and the United States, and many of these works have never been exhibited in the U.S., including new discoveries from Palenque (Mexico) and El Zotz (Guatemala).” — The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Lives of the Gods invites us to experience the exhilarating and profound power of Maya visual artistry,” said Max Hollein, Marina Kellen French Director of The Met. “This stunning exhibition presents spectacular works of art—many rarely seen, especially in New York— and compelling reflections on depictions of the divine; the importance of ancestral knowledge; and new understandings of Maya creative practices and the artist’s role in court society. This is sure to be a memorable show for our visitors.”

Whistle with the Maize God emerging from a flower. Mexico, Late Classic period (600–900). Ceramic, pigment, H. 8 1/8 in. (20.7 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, The Michael C. Rockefeller Memorial Collection, Bequest of Nelson A. Rockefeller, 1979.
K’in Lakam Chahk and Jun Nat Omootz (Maya sculptors, active late 8th century). Panel with royal woman. Usumacinta River region, Guatemala or Mexico, ca. 795. Limestone, W. 27 1/2 in. (69.8 cm). Cleveland Museum of Art, Purchase from the J. H. Wade Fund.
Sak[. . .] Yuk[. . .] Took’ and Sak[. . .] Yib’ah Tzak B’ahlam (Maya sculptors, active 8th century). Stela 51. Calakmul, Mexico, 731. Stone, H. 10 ft. 2 7/8 in. (312 cm). Museo Nacional de Antropología, Mexico City, SECRETARÍA DE CULTURA.- INAH.-MEX.- Reproducción Autorizada por el Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia.
Throne back. Usumacinta River area, Guatemala or Mexico, 600– 909. Limestone, W. 66 ½ in. (169 cm). Museo Amparo, Puebla, Mexico. SECRETARÍA DE CULTURA.-INAH.-MEX.- Reproducción Autorizada por el Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia.
Yax Ahk’ as captive impersonating jaguar deity Monument 155, Tonina, Chiapas, Mexico ca. 700 Sandstone, H. 22 ½ in. (57 cm) Museo de Sitio de Toniná, SECRETARÍA DE CULTURA.- INAH.-MEX.- Reproducción Autorizada por el Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia.
Censer stand. Probably Palenque, Chiapas, Mexico, 690– 720. Ceramic, pigment, H. 44 in. (111.8 cm). Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth, Texas.
K’in Lakam Chahk and Patlajte K’awiil mo[. . .] (Maya sculptors, active 8th century), Throne 1. Piedras Negras, Petén, Guatemala, 8th century. Limestone, W. 78 3/4 in. (200 cm). Museo Nacional de Arqueología y Etnología, Guatemala City, Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes de Guatemala.
Wajaat Na Chahk and a collaborator (Maya sculptors, active 8th century). Panel 3. Piedras Negras, Petén, Guatemala, ca. 782– 95. Limestone, W. 39 3/8 in. (100 cm). Museo Nacional de Arqueología y Etnología, Guatemala City, Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes de Guatemala.

“These Maya artists gave form to the gods in inspired ways, through remarkable works of visual complexity and aesthetic refinement,” said Joanne Pillsbury, Andrall E. Pearson Curator of Ancient American Art, The Michael C. Rockefeller Wing at The Met. “As archaeologists continue to make major discoveries, our knowledge of Classic Maya visual culture becomes enriched, and exhibitions—like this one—reveal new understandings of the relationships between ancient communities and the sacred.”

The exhibition is organized by Joanne Pillsbury, Andrall E. Pearson Curator of Ancient American Art, The Michael C. Rockefeller Wing, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, with Oswaldo Chinchilla Mazariegos, Associate Professor of Anthropology, Yale University, and Laura Filloy Nadal, Associate Curator, also at The Met in The Michael C. Rockefeller Wing. The exhibition was initially conceived with James Doyle, Director the Matson Museum, Associate Research Professor, Pennsylvania State University, and is organized at the Kimbell by Jennifer Casler Price, Curator of Asian, African, and Ancient American Art.

Images courtesy The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Nick Cave: Forothermore at Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, November 18, 2022 – April 10, 2023

“Nick Cave (b. 1959, Fulton, Missouri) has become internationally celebrated for his elaborate sculpture and found-object installations, including his iconic Soundsuits, which blend sculpture, fashion, and social performance. Traveling from the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, Nick Cave: Forothermore is a survey exhibition covering the entire breadth of his career. Featuring sculpture, installation, video, and rarely seen early works, the show examines Cave’s multivalent creative practice as an artist, performer, fashion designer, educator, and activist. The subtitle, ‘Forothermore,’ is a new word that reflects the artist’s lifelong commitment to providing space for those who feel marginalized by dominant society and culture—especially working-class communities and queer people of color. The exhibition both highlights the development of Cave’s singular art practice, which uniquely combines the visual and the performing arts, and interrogates the promises, fulfilled or broken, that the late 20th and early 21st centuries offered to the ‘other’.” — Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

Nick Cave, Garden Plot (aka Wall Relief), 2013. Steel, found textiles, and found ceramic, glass, and metal objects, with beads, four parts, 97 × 74 × 21 in. each. Courtesy the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York. © Nick Cave. Photo: James Prinz
Nick Cave, Soundsuit, 2015. Mannequin, metal, synthetic hair, and found textiles, 98 × 28 × 12 in. Collection of Ashley and Pam Netzky. © Nick Cave
Nick Cave, Sea Sick, 2014. Found oil on canvas and found ceramic, fiberglass, and plastic objects, 96 × 72 × 10 1/2 in. Courtesy the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York. © Nick Cave
Nick Cave, Soundsuit 9:29, 2021. Mannequin and found textiles, with metal, plastic sequins, and buttons, 98 × 33 × 22 in. Courtesy the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York. © Nick Cave
Nick Cave, Arm Peace, 2018. Bronze and found metal objects, 57 1/2 × 19 3/8 × 13 1/2 in. Courtesy the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York. © Nick Cave

Nick Cave: Forothermore is organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago. The exhibition is curated by Naomi Beckwith, Deputy Director and Jennifer and David Stockman Chief Curator of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and Foundation, New York, and formerly Manilow Senior Curator of the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, with Jack Schneider, Curatorial Assistant, Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago. This is Beckwith’s curatorial debut at the Guggenheim. X Zhu-Nowell, Assistant Curator, is supporting the Guggenheim presentation.

Images courtesy Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum.

The Richard Gilder Center for Science, Education, and Innovation at The American Museum of Natural History, opens February 17, 2023

“The American Museum of Natural History revealed how the vision for its Richard Gilder Center for Science, Education, and Innovation is rapidly taking shape in steel, glass, and artfully shaped ‘shotcrete,’ as the Museum released new in-process photographs showing the soaring, light-filled spaces that will welcome visitors when the Gilder Center opens to the public on February 17, 2023. 

With spectacular architecture designed by Studio Gang, the international architecture and urban design practice led by Jeanne Gang, the 230,000-square-foot Gilder Center project invites exploration of the fascinating, far-reaching relationships among species that comprise life on Earth and reveals connections across the Museum’s rich collections, trailblazing research initiatives, educational programs, and exhibition galleries. Physically, the Gilder Center connects many of the Museum’s buildings, creating a continuous campus across four city blocks as envisioned more than 150 years ago. Intellectually, it provides a dramatic embodiment of one of the Museum’s essential messages: all life is connected.” — American Museum of Natural History

Museum President Ellen V. Futter said, “In a time when the need for science literacy has never been more urgent, we are thrilled and proud to be nearing the long-awaited opening date for the Richard Gilder Center for Science, Education, and Innovation, a major new facility that will transform both the work of our museum and the cultural landscape of New York City. In its exhibits and programs, and in the astonishing architecture that presents them to the world, the Gilder Center weds evidence-based thinking and transporting experiences that capture exploration and innovative scientific discovery.”

Construction Photography, October 2022

Richard Gilder Center for Science, Education, and Innovation façade. Milford pink granite is applied in sections to the in-progress façade of the Richard Gilder Center for Science, Education, and Innovation, designed by Studio Gang, at the American Museum of Natural History. Timothy Schenck/© AMNH.
Kenneth C. Griffin Exploration Atrium. The Kenneth C. Griffin Exploration Atrium at the Richard Gilder Center for Science, Education, and Innovation, designed by Studio Gang, at the American Museum of Natural History. October 2022 construction view. View from the top of the staircase.
Kenneth C. Griffin Exploration Atrium. The Kenneth C. Griffin Exploration Atrium at the Richard Gilder Center for Science, Education, and Innovation, designed by Studio Gang, at the American Museum of Natural History. October 2022 construction view. View west from inside the Griffin Atrium.
Kenneth C. Griffin Exploration Atrium. The Kenneth C. Griffin Exploration Atrium at the Richard Gilder Center for Science, Education, and Innovation, designed by Studio Gang, at the American Museum of Natural History. October 2022 construction view. View from the fourth-floor bridge looking west toward Columbus Avenue and Theodore Roosevelt Park.
Third-floor bridge. Construction view of the third-floor bridge spanning the Kenneth C. Griffin Exploration Atrium inside the Richard Gilder Center for Science, Education, and Innovation, designed by Studio Gang, at the American Museum of Natural History. Timothy Schenck/© AMNH.
Classroom. Construction view of a new classroom located on the third floor of the Richard Gilder Center for Science, Education, and Innovation, designed by Studio Gang, at the American Museum of Natural History. Timothy Schenck/© AMNH.
Invisible Worlds. Test patterns projected by technicians working on Invisible Worlds, a 360-degree immersive science-and-art experience designed by Tamschick Media + Space with Boris Micka Associates, located in the Richard Gilder Center for Science, Education, and Innovation at the American Museum of Natural History. Timothy Schenck/© AMNH.

Project Renderings

Entrance. Designed by Studio Gang, the international architecture and urban design practice led by Jeanne Gang, the Richard Gilder Center for Science, Education, and Innovation project will feature an immersive experience that reveals the natural world through spectacular visualizations of scientific data, an insectarium dedicated to the most diverse group of animals on Earth, a permanent butterfly vivarium, a redesigned library, state-of-the-art classrooms, and more. 
Louis V. Gerstner, Jr. Collections Core will house close to 4 million scientific specimens, mostly contained in the five-story Louis V. Gerstner, Jr. Collections Core, a vertical collections facility featuring three stories of floor-to-ceiling exhibits representing every area of the Museum’s collections in vertebrate and invertebrate biology, paleontology, geology, anthropology, and archaeology. The collections and exhibits on the first and second floors of the Collections Core are supported by the Macaulay Family Foundation. 
The Kenneth C. Griffin Exploration Atrium, a soaring, four-story civic space that serves as a new gateway into the Museum from Columbus Avenue, flowing through the campus to create a visitor path from Theodore Roosevelt Park to Central Park West. 
The David S. and Ruth L. Gottesman Research Library and Learning Center will be a dynamic hub that connects visitors with the Museum Library’s unparalleled resources.
The Davis Family Butterfly Vivarium, a permanent exhibition where visitors can mingle with up to 80 species of free-flying butterflies—and sometimes experience one landing on them. 

The Gilder Center, with exhibition design by Ralph Appelbaum Associates, will feature: The Kenneth C. Griffin Exploration Atrium, The David S. and Ruth L. Gottesman Research Library and Learning Center, The five-story Louis V. Gerstner, Jr. Collections Core, The 5,000-square-foot Susan and Peter J. Solomon Family Insectarium, The year-round, 3,000-square-foot Davis Family Butterfly Vivarium and Invisible Worlds.

Images courtesy American Museum of Natural History.

Alex Katz: Gathering at Solomon R. Guggenheim, October 21, 2022 – February 20, 2023

“The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum presents Alex Katz: Gathering, a career retrospective staged in the city where Katz has lived and worked his entire life, and prepared with the close collaboration of the artist. On view from October 21, 2022, through February 20, 2023, the exhibition fills the museum’s Frank Lloyd Wright–designed rotunda and an adjacent Tower Gallery. Encompassing paintings, oil sketches, collages, prints, and freestanding ‘cutout’ works, the show opens with the artist’s intimate sketches of riders on the New York City subway from his student days in the 1940s and culminates in the rapturous and immersive landscapes that have dominated his output in recent years.

“Across eight decades of intense creative production, Alex Katz (b. 1927, Brooklyn, New York) has sought to capture visual experience in the present tense. Writing in 1961, Katz noted that ‘Eternity exists in minutes of absolute awareness. Painting, when successful, seems to be a synthetic reflection of this condition.’ Whether evoking a glancing exchange between friends or a shaft of light filtered through trees, he has aimed to create a record of ‘quick things passing,’ compressing the flux of everyday life into a vivid burst of optical perception.” — Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

Installation views, Alex Katz: Gathering, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, October 21, 2022–February 20, 2023. Photos: Ariel Ione Williams and Midge Wattles © Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York.

Alex Katz: Gathering is organized by Katherine Brinson, Daskalopoulos Curator, Contemporary Art, with Terra Warren, Curatorial Assistant, and with additional support from Andrea Zambrano, Curatorial Assistant.

Title image: Alex Katz, Blue Umbrella 2, 1972. Oil on linen, 96 × 144 inches (243.8 × 365.8 cm). Private collection, New York. © 2022 Alex Katz / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Courtesy private collection.

Edward Hopper’s New York at Whitney Museum of American Art, October 19, 2022 – March 5, 2023

Edward Hopper’s New York, on view at the Whitney Museum of American Art from October 19, 2022, through March 5, 2023, offers an unprecedented examination of Hopper’s life and work in the city that he called home for nearly six decades (1908–67). The exhibition charts the artist’s enduring fascination with the city through more than 200 paintings, watercolors, prints, and drawings from the Whitney’s preeminent collection of Hopper’s work, loans from public and private collections, and archival materials including printed ephemera, correspondence, photographs, and notebooks. From early sketches to paintings from late in his career, Edward Hopper’s New York reveals a vision of the metropolis that is as much a manifestation of Hopper himself as it is a record of a changing city, whose perpetual and sometimes tense reinvention feels particularly relevant today.” — Whitney Museum of American Art

Edward Hopper’s New York offers a remarkable opportunity to celebrate an ever-changing yet timeless city through the work of an American icon,” says Adam D. Weinberg, the Alice Pratt Brown Director of the Whitney Museum. “As New York bounces back after two challenging years of global pandemic, this exhibition reconsiders the life and work of Edward Hopper, serves as a barometer of our times, and introduces a new generation of audiences to Hopper’s work by a new generation of scholars. This exhibition offers fresh perspectives and radical new insights.”

Installation views of Edward Hopper’s New York at Whitney Museum of American Art. Photos by Corrado Serra.

“Hopper lived most of his life right here, only blocks from where the Whitney stands today,” says Conaty. “He experienced the same streets and witnessed the incessant cycles of demolition and construction that continue today, as New York reinvents itself again and again. Yet, as few others have done so poignantly, Hopper captured a city that was both changing and changeless, a particular place in time and one distinctly shaped by his imagination. Seeing his work through this lens opens new pathways for exploring even Hopper’s most iconic works.”

Edward Hopper’s New York is organized by Kim Conaty, Steven and Ann Ames Curator of Drawings and Prints, with Melinda Lang, Senior Curatorial Assistant, at the Whitney.

Title image: Edward Hopper, Early Sunday Morning, 1930. Oil on canvas, 35 3/16 × 60 1/4 in. (89.4 × 153 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase with funds from Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney 31.426. © 2019 Heirs of Josephine N. Hopper / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

She Who Wrote: Enheduanna and Women of Mesopotamia, ca. 3400-2000 B.C. at The Morgan Library & Museum, October 14, 2022 – February 19, 2023

“The Morgan Library & Museum proudly presents She Who Wrote: Enheduanna and Women of Mesopotamia, ca. 3400-2000 B.C. opening October 14, 2022, and running through February 19, 2023. The exhibition brings together for the first time a comprehensive selection of artworks that capture the rich and shifting expressions of women’s lives in ancient Mesopotamia during the late fourth and third millennia BC. It centers on the high priestess and poet Enheduanna (ca. 2300 BC), the world’s first author known by name, who wielded considerable religious and political power. Displaying a spectacular collection of her texts alongside other works made circa 3400–2000 BC, She Who Wrote celebrates Enheduanna’s poetry and her legacy as an author, priestess, and woman while bearing testament to women’s diverse roles in religious, social, economic, and political contexts—as goddesses, priestesses, worshippers, mothers, workers, and rulers.” — The Morgan Library & Museum

The Morgan’s Director, Colin B. Bailey, said, “After unavoidable delays due to the pandemic, we are delighted to be cooperating with colleagues from museums around the world, who have remained steadfast in their commitment to assist the Morgan in presenting this groundbreaking exhibition. Enheduanna’s legacy is multifaceted, and the Morgan is honored to present her story to a new generation of visitors.” 

Kneeling female figure Iran, proto-Elamite, Susa (modern Shush) Late Uruk period, ca. 3300 BC © Musée de l’Armée, Dist. RMN-Grand Palais / Art Resource, NY. Photography by Les frères Chuzeville.
Cylinder seal (and modern impression) with sheep and stylized plants Mesopotamia, Sumerian Late Uruk–Jemdet Nasr period, ca. 3300–2900 BC. Courtesy of the Yale Babylonian Collection. Photography by Klaus Wagensonner (seal) and Graham S. Haber (impression).
Fragment of a vessel with frontal image of goddess Mesopotamia, Sumerian Early Dynastic IIIb period, ca. 2400 BC. © Staatliche Museen zu Berlin- Vorderasiatisches Museum. Photo by Olaf M. Teßmer.
Cylinder seal (and modern impression) with goddesses Ninishkun and Ishtar Mesopotamia, Akkadian Akkadian period (ca. 2334–2154 BC). Courtesy of the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago.
Stele of Shara-igizi-Abzu Mesopotamia, Sumerian, possibly Umma (modern Tell Jokha) Early Dynastic I–II period, ca. 2900– 2600 BC. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Funds from various donors, 1958.
Cylinder seal (and modern impression) of Queen Puabi Mesopotamia, Sumerian, Ur (modern Tell el-Muqayyar), PG 800, Puabi’s Tomb Chamber, against Puabi’s upper right arm Early Dynastic IIIa period, ca. 2500 BC. Courtesy of the Penn Museum.
Queen Puabi’s funerary ensemble Mesopotamia, Sumerian, Ur (modern Tell el- Muqayyar), PG 800, Puabi’s Tomb Chamber, on Puabi’s body Early Dynastic IIIa period, ca. 2500 BC. Courtesy of the Penn Museum.
Seated female figure with vessel in hands Mesopotamia, Neo-Sumerian, Girsu (modern Tello) Ur III period (ca. 2112–2004 BC). © RMN-Grand Palais / Art Resource, NY. Photography by Franck Raux.
Tablets inscribed with “The Exaltation of Inanna” in three parts Mesopotamia, possibly Larsa (modern Tell Senkereh) Old Babylonian period, ca. 1750 BC. Courtesy of the Yale Babylonian Collection. Photography by Klaus Wagensonner.

The exhibition is curated by Sidney Babcock, Jeannette and Jonathan Rosen Curator and Department Head of Ancient Western Asian Seals and Tablets at the Morgan and co-curated by Erhan Tamur, Curatorial Research Associate for the Department.

Babcock said, “Enheduanna is nothing less than the first known author in history. That she is not better known is something this exhibition hopes to remedy. The images of women from this period, presented here for the first time as a group, have often been overlooked. It is time to take a closer look at the extraordinary artistry of these images, as well as the way in which they reflect the contributions of women at the beginning of history. Preparing for this exhibition during the pandemic has been a challenge. I am deeply grateful to my colleagues at the Morgan and at the many national and international lending institutions for their enthusiastic support for this groundbreaking effort.”

Images courtesy The Morgan Library & Museum.

The Salem Witch Trials: Reckoning and Reclaiming at New-York Historical Society, October 7, 2022 – January 22, 2023

“Even after 300 years, Salem’s witch trials remain a defining example of intolerance and injustice in American history. The extraordinary events of 1692-3 led to the deaths of 25 innocent people, the vast majority of whom were women. Organized by the Peabody Essex Museum, the exhibition includes tangible fragments from the past that illuminate the real lives of Salem’s residents: those accused of witchcraft, their accusers, and those who defended them against legal charges, risking their own lives and reputations in the process. The exhibition seeks to ask: In moments of injustice, what role do we play?

Highlights include John Proctor’s brass sundial; a loom that belonged to Rebecca Putnam, whose family was a major force in the accusations; and materials from New-York Historical’s collection, including a 17th-century account of the trials, alongside contemporary creative responses from Salem descendants. A gown from fashion designer Alexander McQueen’s 2007 collection In Memory of Elizabeth How, 1692 is based on research into his ancestor Elizabeth How, who was condemned and hanged as a witch in July 1692. Portraits from the series Major Arcana: Portraits of Witches in America by contemporary photographer Frances F. Denny—a descendant from one of the presiding trial magistrates—seek to reclaim the meaning of the word ‘witch’ from its historical use as a tool to silence and control women.” — New-York Historical Society

Installation views of The Salem Witch Trials: Reckoning and Reclaiming at New-York Historical Society. Photos by Corrado Serra.

The Salem Witch Trials: Reckoning and Reclaiming is organized by the Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, Massachusetts. This exhibition was co-curated by Dan Lipcan, the Ann C. Pingree Director of the Phillips Library; Paula Richter, curator; and Lydia Gordon; associate curator. At New-York Historical, it was coordinated by Anna Danziger Halperin, associate director of the Center for Women’s History.

The Eveillard Gift at Frick Madison, October 13, 2022 – February 26, 2023

“The major fall exhibition at Frick Madison (the temporary home of The Frick Collection during renovation of its historic buildings) presents the largest and most significant promised gift of drawings and pastels in the institution’s history. Assembled by Elizabeth ‘Betty’ and Jean-Marie Eveillard, avid collectors of drawings and pastels, the exhibition includes European works ranging in date from the end of the fifteenth century to the twentieth century and representing artists working in France, Britain, Italy, Spain, and the Netherlands. The twenty-six works include some of the couple’s finest acquisitions: eighteen drawings, five pastels, two prints, and one oil sketch. Along with preparatory figurative sketches and independent studies and portraits are two vivid landscape scenes. Artists represented come from the same schools that attracted Henry Clay Frick as a collector, many of whom are represented in the permanent collection: François Boucher, Edgar Degas, Jean-Honoré Fragonard, Francisco José de Goya y Lucientes, Thomas Lawrence, and Jean-François Millet. The gift also introduces to the museum’s holdings works by artists not previously represented, including Gustave Caillebotte, Maurice Quentin de La Tour, Jan Lievens, John Singer Sargent, and Elisabeth Vigée Le Brun.” — Frick Collection

Federico Barocci. Head of a Man, ca. 1589. Black chalk with orange, pink, and yellow pastel on blue laid paper. 9 3/8 x 8 7/8 inches. Promised Gift from the Collection of Elizabeth and Jean-Marie Eveillard. Photo: Joseph Coscia Jr.
Salvator Rosa. Head of a Woman (Lucrezia Paolini), 1640s. Black, red, and white chalk with blue, yellow, pink, and white pastel on beige laid paper. 12 15/16 x 9 7/16 inches. Promised Gift from the Collection of Elizabeth and Jean-Marie Eveillard. Photo: Joseph Coscia Jr.
Nicolas Lancret. Two Women Dressed “à la grecque” with a Subsidiary Study of a Head, late 1720s. Red, black, and white chalk on light brown laid paper. 7 1/4 x 9 1/2 inches. Promised Gift from the Collection of Elizabeth and Jean-Marie Eveillard. Photo: Joseph Coscia Jr.
Maurice-Quentin de La Tour. Anne-Marguerite Perrinet de Longuefin, Madame Rouillé, ca. 1738. Pastel on laid paper. 24 1/4 x 19 1/2 inches. Promised Gift from the Collection of Elizabeth and Jean-Marie Eveillard. Photo: Joseph Coscia Jr.
François Boucher. A Reclining Shepherdess (“La Bergère au Coeur”), 1753. Black, red, and white chalk and blue, light blue, red, pink, and yellow pastel with touches of gray watercolor washes and possibly some traces of graphite on laid paper. 15 1/2 × 18 7/8 inches. Promised Gift from the Collection of Elizabeth and Jean-Marie Eveillard. Photo: Joseph Coscia Jr.
Jean-Honoré Fragonard. Young Woman (“La Coquette”), ca. 1770–73. Red chalk with touches of black chalk underdrawing on cream laid paper. 14 3/8 x 8 1/4 inches. Promised Gift from the Collection of Elizabeth and Jean-Marie Eveillard. Photo: Joseph Coscia Jr.
Jean-Baptiste Greuze. Head of a Boy, ca. 1777. Red chalk on cream laid paper. 15 1/2 x 12 3/4 inches. Promised Gift from the Collection of Elizabeth and Jean-Marie Eveillard. Photo: Joseph Coscia Jr.
Élisabeth-Louise Vigée Le Brun. Head of a Woman, 1784. Pastel on faded blue paper. 12 x 9 7/8 inches. Promised Gift from the Collection of Elizabeth and Jean-Marie Eveillard. Photo: Joseph Coscia Jr.
John Constable. Study for “The Leaping Horse,” ca. 1824–25. Oil on canvas. 8 3/8 x 10 5/8 inches. Promised Gift from the Collection of Elizabeth and Jean-Marie Eveillard. Ph.: Joseph Coscia Jr.
Eugène Delacroix. North African Man and Woman with Baskets of Vegetables and Fruit, ca. 1853. Pastel on paper. 8 9/16 x 12 1/2 inches. Promised Gift from the Collection of Elizabeth and Jean-Marie Eveillard. Photo: Joseph Coscia Jr.
Edgar Degas. Adelchi Morbilli, ca. 1857. Graphite on off-white wove paper. 9 5/8 x 6 1/2 inches. Promised Gift from the Collection of Elizabeth and Jean-Marie Eveillard. Photo: Joseph Coscia Jr.
Jean-François Millet. Thatched Cottages near Vichy, 1867. Watercolor, brown ink, and pen on cream laid paper. 7 5/16 x 9 15/16 inches. Promised Gift from the Collection of Elizabeth and Jean-Marie Eveillard. Photo: Joseph Coscia Jr.
Gustave Caillebotte. A Man with an Umbrella Stepping onto a Sidewalk, ca. 1876–77. Graphite and pencil on light beige laid paper. 18 x 11 11/16 inches. Promised Gift from the Collection of Elizabeth and Jean-Marie Eveillard. Photo: Joseph Coscia Jr.

The Eveillard Gift is organized by Xavier F. Salomon, the Frick’s Deputy Director and Peter Jay Sharp Curator; Curator Aimee Ng; and Giulio Dalvit, Assistant Curator of Sculpture, and will be accompanied by a catalogue and public programs.

Comments Salomon, “We are thrilled to share examples from the remarkable collection of two longtime supporters of the Frick, assembled just as our own holdings have been, according to criteria of beauty, quality, and condition. The Eveillards describe themselves as ‘emotional collectors,’ meaning that every work they have acquired spoke deeply to them. We hope this presentation of their transformative gift will engage our visitors as deeply.”

The Tudors: Art and Majesty in Renaissance England at The Met, October 10, 2022 – January 8, 2023 

“From King Henry VII’s seizure of the throne in 1485 to the death of his granddaughter Queen Elizabeth I in 1603, England’s Tudor monarchs used art to legitimize and glorify their tumultuous reigns. The Tudors: Art and Majesty in Renaissance England traces the transformation of the arts under their rule through more than 100 objects—including iconic portraits, spectacular tapestries, manuscripts, sculpture, and armor—from both the Museum collection and international lenders.

England under the volatile Tudor dynasty was a thriving home for the arts. An international community of artists and merchants, many of them religious refugees from across Europe, navigated the high-stakes demands of royal patrons against the backdrop of shifting political relationships with mainland Europe. The Tudor courts were truly cosmopolitan, boasting the work of Florentine sculptors, German painters, Flemish weavers, and Europe’s best armorers, goldsmiths, and printers, while also contributing to the emergence of a distinctly English style. This exhibition features works of art made under the patronage of all five Tudor monarchs: Henry VII (reigned 1485–1509), Henry VIII (1509–47), Edward VI (1547–53), Mary I (1553–58), and Elizabeth I (1558–1603). It is organized thematically in five sections within an overall exhibition design that evokes the long galleries and intimate alcoves that defined Tudor palace architecture.” — The Met 

Installation views of The Tudors: Art and Majesty in Renaissance England, on view October 10, 2022–January 8, 2023 at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Photos by Anna-Marie Kellen, courtesy of The Met.

“This magnificent exhibition brings the stunning majesty and compelling drama of the Tudor dynasty to life,” said Max Hollein, Marina Kellen French Director of The Met. “By examining the wider political and societal context in which these sumptuous goods and extraordinary portraits were made, we can appreciate both their exquisite beauty as works of art and the complex and often turbulent stories they tell.”

The Tudors: Art and Majesty in Renaissance England is curated by Elizabeth Cleland, Curator in the Department of European Sculpture and Decorative Arts, and Adam Eaker, Associate Curator in the Department of European Paintings. Additional support was provided by Sarah Bochicchio, former Curatorial Research Assistant at The Met. The exhibition design is by Senior Exhibition Designer Fabiana Weinberg.

The exhibition is organized by The Metropolitan Museum of Art and The Cleveland Museum of Art, in collaboration with the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco.

Death in the Making: Reexamining the Iconic Spanish Civil War Photobook at International Center of Photography (ICP), September 30, 2022 – January 9, 2023

“The first major monographic exhibition to tell the story of Robert Capa’s influential 1938 wartime photobook, Death in the Making: Reexamining the Iconic Spanish Civil War Photobook will be on view at the International Center of Photography (ICP) from September 30, 2022 through January 9, 2023. The exhibition brings together nearly 75 original photographs and related ephemera to offer new insight into the book Death in the Making, a touchstone in the history of war photography that resonates today. In addition to work by Hungarian photojournalist Robert Capa, the exhibition presents new scholarship to properly credit the contributions of Polish-American photojournalist Chim (David Seymour), and German photojournalist Gerda Taro. The book is dedicated to Taro and was published in the wake of her death at the Spanish front in July 1937. The show, curated by Cynthia Young, former curator of the Robert Capa and Cornell Capa Archive at ICP, is accompanied by a 2020 edition of the book Death in the Making, published by Damiani/ICP.

Death in the Making: Reexamining the Iconic Spanish Civil War Photobook represents the first in an ongoing series of exhibitions that revisit and highlight ICP’s permanent collection and celebrate its history. ICP was founded in 1974 by photojournalist Cornell Capa, who championed ‘concerned photography.’ Cornell was the brother of Robert Capa, who founded Magnum Photos in 1947.” — ICP

Robert Capa, [Crowd of Republican soldiers listening to a speech, Córdoba front, Spain], August-September 1936. The Robert and Cornell Capa Archive, Gift of Cornell and Edith Capa, 1992 (709.1992). © International Center of Photography / Magnum Photos.
Robert Capa, [Republican soldiers saluting through the windows of their departing train, Barcelona, Spain], August, 1936. The Robert Capa and Cornell Capa Archive, Gift of Cornell and Edith Capa, 2010 (2010.86.16) © International Center of Photography / Magnum Photos.
Gerda Taro, [Republican soldiers, La Granjuela, Spain], June 1937. Gift of Cornell and Edith Capa, 2002 (511.2002). Courtesy International Center of Photography.
Robert Capa, [Militiamen marching through a field, near Barcelona], August 1936. Gift of William Piel, 1994 (585.1994). © International Center of Photography / Magnum Photos.
Gerda Taro, [Two boys on a barricade, Barcelona], August 1936. Gift of Cornell and Edith Capa, 1992 (588.1992). Courtesy International Center of Photography.
Robert Capa, [Children walking along a train track, fleeing Nationalist bombings, near Cerro Muriano, Córdoba front, Spain], September 1936. The Robert Capa and Cornell Capa Archive, Gift of Cornell and Edith Capa, 1992 (692.1992). © International Center of Photography / Magnum Photos.
Robert Capa, [Woman after an air raid, Madrid], 1936. The Robert Capa and Cornell Capa Archive, Gift of Cornell and Edith Capa, 1992 (885.1992). © International Center of Photography / Magnum Photos.
Robert Capa, [Two refugee women sitting with children, Madrid], 1936. The Robert Capa and Cornell Capa Archive, Gift of Cornell and Edith Capa, 1992 (886.1992). © International Center of Photography / Magnum Photos.
Gerda Taro, [Civilians pressing against bars of the morgue following an air raid, Valencia, Spain], May 1937. Gift of William Piel, 1994 (99.1995). Courtesy International Center of Photography.

“As we celebrate ICP’s history by revisiting collection highlights in a contemporary context, Death in the Making presents audiences with new insight into the historically resonant contributions of Robert Capa, Chim, and Gerda Taro,” said David E. Little, Executive Director of ICP, “and, as evidenced in recent photographs of the Russia-Ukraine War, points to photography’s ongoing relevance in political discourse, debate, and action.”

Images courtesy International Center of Photography (ICP).

Close Enough: New Perspectives from 12 Women Photographers of Magnum at International Center of Photography (ICP), September 30, 2022 – January 9, 2023

“This fall, The International Center of Photography (ICP) presents the exhibition Close Enough: New Perspectives from 12 Women Photographers of Magnum, which offers unique viewpoints on the extraordinary relationships that photographers forge with global situations, communities, and individual subjects. As part of the exhibition, each of the contributing photographers openly reflects upon their intentions and practices, creating a timely chorus of creative voices responding to enduring and urgent human experiences. On view from September 30, 2022, through January 9, 2023, Close Enough takes its title from Magnum Photos co-founder Robert Capa’s well-known quote ‘If your pictures aren’t good enough, you’re not close enough’.

The ICP exhibition presents distinct vantage points that are shaping the scope of the pioneering photography collective Magnum Photos, with pivotal projects by 12 emerging and established contemporary women photographers: Olivia Arthur, Myriam Boulos, Sabiha Çimen, Cristina de Middel, Bieke Depoorter, Carolyn Drake, Nanna Heitmann, Susan Meiselas, Hannah Price, Lua Ribeira, Alessandra Sanguinetti, and Newsha Tavakolian. Together, they move and challenge the photography collective’s boundaries, deepening Magnum’s photographic quest to explore the human realm.” — ICP

Installation views of Close Enough: New Perspectives from 12 Women Photographers of Magnum. Photos by Corrado Serra.

Close Enough presents a selection of critical projects by a truly extraordinary group of Magnum photographers spanning multiple generations and cultures,” said ICP executive director David E. Little. “Each project points to the contemporary evolution of concerned photography around the globe and reflects on the complexity of politics and representation today.”

Margherita Raso: Vizio di Forma at Italian Cultural Center of New York, September 21 – November 25, 2022

“Magazzino Italian Art presents Vizio di Forma, Margherita Raso’s first institutional solo exhibition in the United States, curated by Chiara Mannarino and exhibited in collaboration with the Italian Cultural Institute in New York and Casa Italiana Zerilli-Marimò at New York University.

Raso’s practice spans a variety of mediums, from sculpture to site-specific installation, and has a material focus. Vizio di Forma is composed of three bodies of sculptural work that engage with diverse languages, forms, and styles—together encapsulating the artist’s practice to date. Nearly each piece was newly produced for the exhibition.” — Magazzino Italian Art

Installation views of Margherita Raso: Vizio di Forma at Italian Cultural Center of New York. Photos by Tommaso Sacconi. Courtesy Magazzino Italian Art, Cold Spring, NY.

Margherita Raso. Photo by Tommaso Sacconi. Courtesy Magazzino Italian Art, Cold Spring, NY.

Title image: Margherita Raso, Untitled, 2022, jacquard fabric, steel frame, magnets, 90 1/2 x 133 7/8 in (230 x 340 cm). Photo by Tommaso Sacconi. Courtesy Magazzino Italian Art, Cold Spring, NY.