“Helle Damkjaer. Danish Elegance: Shapes, Materials and Design at Galerie Carole Decombe, Paris, through January 20, 2018

Helle Damkjaer. Danish Elegance: shapes, materials and design is an exhibition that brings together the works of Danish ceramist and contemporary designer Helle Damkjær. The exhibition reveals her elegant organic patterned sculptures, fine furniture as well as her timeless jewellery. Without ever getting stuck in one unique vision, Helle loves to play with shapes and materials. Her creative design, both simple and extremely thought through, is a testament to her Scandinavian roots. She is a worthy successor to this traditional art and never ceases to reinvent it.

Ceramist and multi-talented designer, Helle Damkjær was born in Denmark and has been living in France for over ten years. She has worked for several luxury firms in New York, Tokyo, Paris and Copenhagen such as Kitani, Georg Jensen, Tai ping and Guerlain. Today she is the recipient of several prestigious awards (Red Dot Design Award, Design Plus Award, Wallpaper magazine design award ….) and one of the most recognised names in contemporary Danish creation design.

Helle Damkjaer’s work is often described as elegant and sensual. An impression born from a perfect balance between materials, shapes and design. Be it furniture, lighting, ceramics or jewellery, her worksnalways radiate a sculptural smoothness.” — Galerie Carole Decombe

Tall White (S), Earthenware sculpture, 2017

Tall White (M), Earthenware sculpture, 2017

Tall White (XL), Sandstone sculpture, 2017

Asymmetric White, Earthenware sculpture, 2017

Oval Centerpiece, Sandstone sculpture, 2017

White Soft, Earthenware sculpture, 2017

White Wave M, Earthenware sculpture, 2017

Bronze 1, polished bronze, 2016

Code Bar side tables, brass, 2017

Jewels pendant and wall light, brass and Murano glass, 2017

Photos by Jeremy Josselin, courtesy Galerie Carole Decombe.

Zeng Fanzhi | Van Gogh at Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam, through February 25, 2018

“In ‘Zeng Fanzhi | Van Gogh’, the Van Gogh Museum presents five works by Zeng Fanzhi (born 1964), one of the best-known contemporary Chinese artist and a fervent admirer of Vincent van Gogh.

Zeng has already exhibited in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, the National Art Museum of China and Musée du Louvre and – especially for the Van Gogh Museum – has now made a set of six paintings inspired by Van Gogh’s self-portraits.

Three of these portraits are on display in the Van Gogh Museum, along with a painting of Zeng’s shoes (Boots) and a huge, impressive work measuring 200 x 350 cm inspired by Van Gogh’s masterpiece Wheatfield with Crows. Zeng’s new work will be shown to the public for the first time in the feature exhibition on the third floor of the Van Gogh Museum.

We experience Van Gogh’s self-portraits, shoes and wheatfields in a different way through Zeng’s eyes. He combines his own style with the work of Vincent van Gogh in a swirling pattern of lines that reflects the tradition of Chinese calligraphy. Zeng Fanzhi gets us to look at and think about Van Gogh’s work, about his brushstrokes, his use of colour and his artistic vision. Zeng says of Van Gogh, ‘he has become a legend in my heart’.” — Van Gogn Museum

Vincent van Gogh, Shoes, 1886

Zeng Fanzhi, Boots, 2009

Zeng Fanzhi, Wheatfield with Crows, 2017

Zeng Fanzhi, Van Gogh II, 2017

Zeng Fanzhi, Van Gogh III, 2017

Zeng Fanzhi, Van Gogh IV, 2017

Axel Rüger, Director of the Van Gogh Museum, says, ‘Zeng Fanzhi | Van Gogh fits into a series of feature exhibitions of modern and contemporary art in the Van Gogh Museum that show the influence Van Gogh had on the generations that followed him. This exhibition shows that Van Gogh is still a source of inspiration to this day. We are extremely honoured that Zeng Fanzhi has made these works for the museum and we are particularly proud of the end result.’

Zeng Fanzhi | Van Gogh was made in close collaboration with the Fanzhi Foundation and the artist’s studio team.

Images courtesy Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam (Vincent van Gogh Foundation).

Questioning Pictures: Stefano Graziani at Fondazione Prada Osservatorio in Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II, through February 26, 2018

“In Questioning Pictures Stefano Graziani investigates archival and conservation systems in museums like the Canadian Centre for Architecture (CCA) in Montreal, Canada; Sir John Soane’s Museum in London, UK; the Kunstmuseum Basel, Switzerland; Museum Insel Hombroich in Neuss, Germany; the Museo di Castelvecchio in Verona, Italy; and the Plaster Cast Gallery at Museo Canova in Possagno, Italy, focusing on the ambivalent relationship between photography and the museum object. Photography navigates an ambiguous territory in Graziani’s work: on one hand he documents diverse materials like drawings and architectural models, books, photographs and paintings; on the other, he embarks on an interpretative path through the careful use of light and camera angles, as well as the inclusion of disturbing elements in his shots. His photographs not only shed light on museum collections and archives usually denied to visitors, but reactivate them according to entirely subjective logic and perspectives.

As Francesco Zanot emphasizes, Questioning Pictures is a sort of crash test designed to assess the museum’s ability to resist external attacks and increase its permeability in proportion. Graziani transforms the invisible into something visible, preventing these terms from being subsequently reversed, and thus sheds light on one of the primary mechanisms through which museums generate and control their power. The regulations that museums impose on reproducing materials in their collections fulfill the same role. Graziani systematically evades them, carrying out an act of civil disobedience by adopting an ethical and formal rigor reminiscent of the photographs of Walker Evans and Lewis Baltz.’ As Okwui Enwezor maintains, Graziani is tackling an indisputable fact ‘because the camera is literally an archiving machine, every photograph… is a priori an archival object.’ And Graziani is building an anti-archive’.” — Fondazione Prada Osservatorio

Exhibition photos (inkjet prints) are by Stefano Graziani.

Soggiorno, Casa-Museo Boschi Di Stefano, Giorgio de Chirico, La scuola dei gladiatori, il combattimento, 1928, (Virginia Guiotto, nello studio di Antonio Boschi), Milan, 2017.

Antonio Canova, Palamede, Gypsotheca e Museo Antonio Canova, Possagno, 2017.

Left: Aldo Rossi, study model for the entrance foyer of the Deutsches Historisches Museum, Berlin, 1987-1990, 12.0 x 25.0 x 25.0 cm, AP142. S1.D122 .P18, Aldo Rossi Fonds, Canadian Centre for Architecture, © Fondazione Aldo Rossi, Montreal, 2017.

Center: Gordon Matta-Clark, floor plan for Office Baroque, 1977, blue ballpoint pen on graph paper, 42 x 59.5 cm, PHCON2002:0016:058, Gordon Matta-Clark collection, Canadian Centre for Architecture, Gift of Estate of Gordon Matta-Clark, © Estate of Gordon Matta-Clark / SIAE, Montreal, 2017.

Installation view of the exhibition “Questioning Pictures: Stefano Graziani”

Lucas Cranach d. Ältere, Lucretia, um 1535/40 Öl auf Holz 79 x 64 cm, Kunstmuseum Basel, Ankauf 1934, inv. 1628, Basel, 2017.

Left: Paintings Cabinet, Sir John Soane’s Museum, London, 2017. Center: Carlo Scarpa, Museo di Castelvecchio, Ala della Reggia, prospetto e schizzi per la cornice della Madonna con il Bambino di Giovanni Bellini al secondo piano della Reggia, inventory number: 31805, recto, pastello rosso, giallo, blu di due tonalità e lilla su cartoncino, 316 x 432 mm 1958 – 1961, Archivio Carlo Scarpa, Museo di Castelvecchio, Verona, 2017. Right: Félix Bonfils, The Temple of Rameses, Karnak, Thebes, ca.1870’s, Albumen silver print, 22.9 x 28.8 cm, PH1980:0683.01:034, Canadian Centre for Architecture, Montreal, 2017.

Natura morta, MR Table, Thonet, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, 1935, Stiftung Insel Hombroich, Neuss, 2017.

Left: Adolf Loos, Villa Müller (Maria Szadkowska, Curatrice di Villa Müller), 1928, The City of Prague Museum, Prague, 2017. Right: Gordon Matta-Clark, drawing n. 6 from seven proposals for Documenta, 1977, 21.0 x 30.2 cm, PHCON2002:0016:046:006, Gordon Matta-Clark Collection, Canadian Centre for Architecture, Gift of Estate of Gordon Matta-Clark, © Estate of Gordon Matta-Clark / SIAE, Montreal, 2017.

Left: John Hejduk, presentation model for the House of the Painter, 1984, 51.3 x 25.4 x 61.0 cm, DR1998:0105, John Hejduk fonds, Canadian Centre for Architecture, © CCA, Montreal, 2017.

Questioning Pictures is an exhibition project by Stefano Graziani. Curated by Francesco Zanot, the exhibition includes a new body of works commissioned by Fondazione Prada that explores photography as a tool for narration, cataloguing and reinterpretation.

Installation photos by Delfino Sisto Legnani and Marco Cappelletti, courtesy Fondazione Prada.

Jewelry of Ideas: Gifts from the Susan Grant Lewin Collection at Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, through May 28, 2018

Jewelry of Ideas: Gifts from the Susan Grant Lewin Collection celebrates the recent gift from the renowned collector to Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum. The exhibition, co-curated by Ursula Ilse-Neuman and Cooper Hewitt, features 150 brooches, necklaces, bracelets and rings, and traces radical developments in jewelry from the mid-20th century to the present. Works on view highlight jewelry design’s expressive and innovative achievements, ranging from works that make a political statement by eschewing silver and gold for industrial materials, to pieces that employ found materials to tell a personal narrative.

The exhibition captures the diversity and achievement of modern and contemporary jewelry designers from Holland, Japan, Israel, the United States and elsewhere. Many of the pieces confront social, political or personal concerns using unconventional materials and techniques. Contained within a ring may be a history of the mathematical proportions of the Palladian villas of the Veneto, as in the case of Giampaolo Babetto. Within a bracelet may be a rejection of the cult of the precious, as seen in Otto Künzli’s “Gold Makes You Blind,” where an 18-karat gold ball is encased in a rubber bangle.” — Cooper Hewitt

Giampaolo Babetto; Brooch, 1995; Molded, pressed, folded and stippled 18k gold sheet with applied pigment; H x W x D: 6.2 x 4 x 2.6 cm (2 7/16 x 1 9/16 x 1 in.); The Susan Grant Lewin Collection, Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum; Photo: Matt Flynn © Smithsonian Institution

Friedrich Becker; Ring (kinetic), 1993; Silver, acrylic; H x D: 3.5 x 3.2 cm (1 3/8 x 1 1/4 in.); The Susan Grant Lewin Collection, Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum; Photo: Matt Flynn © Smithsonian Institution

Ivy Ross; Necklace from the Colorcore Personal Adornment Series, 1983; Colorcore Formica fragments, clothespins (painted wood, metal), cord; L x W x D: 36.3 x 26.4 x 1.3 cm (14 5/16 x 10 3/8 x 1/2 in.); The Susan Grant Lewin Collection, Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum; Photo: Matt Flynn © Smithsonian Institution

Attai Chen; Untitled (5) from the Compounding Fractions Series, 2010; Paper, paint, coal, glue, linen; H x W x D: 20.5 x 15 x 7.3 cm (8 1/16 x 5 7/8 x 2 7/8 in.); The Susan Grant Lewin Collection, Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum; Photo: Matt Flynn © Smithsonian Institution

Sam Tho Duong; Ginger Brooch from the Ginger Series, 2004; Electroformed silver; H x W x D: 4.8 x 6.4 x 2 cm (1 3/4 x 2 1/4 x 1 in.); The Susan Grant Lewin Collection, Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum; Photo: Matt Flynn © Smithsonian Institution

Arline Fisch; Spirit with 3 Legs, from the Spirit Houses Series, 1988; Silver, 18k woven structure, agate; L x W x D: 15.1 x 6.6 x 1.2 cm (5 15/16 x 2 19/32 x 15/32 in.); The Susan Grant Lewin Collection, Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum; Photo: Matt Flynn © Smithsonian Institution

Ramona Solberg; Necklace, 1989; Dominos, leather cord, silver; H x W x D: 28.5 x 20.5 x 1.3 cm (11 1/4 x 8 1/16 x 1/2 in.); The Susan Grant Lewin Collection, Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum; Photo: Matt Flynn © Smithsonian Institution

Otto Künzli; Pendant from the Fragments Series, 1986; Picture frame fragment, wood, steel; H x W x D: 35 x 26 x 3 cm (13 3/4 x 10 1/4 x 1 3/16 in.); The Susan Grant Lewin Collection, Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum; Photo: Matt Flynn © Smithsonian Institution

Ted Noten; Crazy Glasses, 2008; Silver, fur, snakeskin; H x W x D: 45 x 15 x 2.5 cm (17 11/16 x 5 7/8 x 1 in.); The Susan Grant Lewin Collection, Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum; Photo: Matt Flynn © Smithsonian Institution

Joyce Scott; Necklace, 2016; Glass beads, thread (Peyote stitch technique); H x W x D: 34.2 x 24 x 1.5 cm (13 7/16 x 9 7/16 x 9/16 in.); The Susan Grant Lewin Collection, Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum; Photo: Matt Flynn © Smithsonian Institution

“I have been collecting jewelry for decades and it only becomes more exciting as the field of conceptual jewelry design continues to flourish,” said Susan Grant Lewin. “I meet designers from around the world, so the collection is international in scope. I like to find the leaders and innovators—the most experimental jewelry designers—and I am thrilled that Cooper Hewitt is exposing their revolutionary work to the general public.”

Images courtesy Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum.

Radiant with Color & Art: McLoughlin Brothers and the Business of Picture Books, 1858-1920 at The Grolier Club, December 6, 2017 – February 3, 2018

“The McLoughlin brothers, John Jr. (1827–1905) and Edmund (1833/4–1889), were New York publishers who operated from 1858 to 1920. The firm that they founded produced books and games for children for over fifty years, a notable achievement for any business, but an especially important one in the history of picture book publishing. As one of the first publishers to focus exclusively on products for children, McLoughlin Brothers was able to shape and define the American picture book market. The firm used wholesale and retail channels to distribute its books across the country and in Latin America and Europe; produced picture-dominated books that significantly escalated consumer’s expectations that image-laden books could be had at affordable prices; and created popular content that reflected the modern world of the child reader. The brothers never rested on their success, always striving to use technological innovation to improve their products and keep prices down and profits up. In no small way, McLoughlin Brothers sold the idea of picture books as a cultural necessity of American childhood—a belief still held by parents today.

This exhibition documents the working practice of the firm by associating its products with many of the tools used during the production process, such as printing blocks, designer mock ups, and watercolor illustration art. These objects tell a story firmly rooted in the discipline of book history, but also hint at nuances of nineteenthcentury business practices, the advancement of literacy for children, and revelations about cultural norms of the era during which McLoughlin Brothers thrived.” — The Grolier Club

Sarah Noble Ives, “At the Ball,” from Cinderella. Watercolor, gouache, pen and ink, ca. 1912. American Antiquarian Society

A Peep at Buffalo Bill’s Wild West (New York: McLoughlin Brothers, 1887). Gift of Herbert H. Hosmer, 1978. American Antiquarian Society

Young America’s A.B.C. and Pretty Picture Book (New York: McLoughlin Brothers, 1899-1900). Gift of Herbert H. Hosmer, 1978. American Antiquarian Society

A.B.C. of Objects for Home and School. Kindergarten First Book (London: Griffith, Farran, Okeden & Welsh). Copyright held by McLoughlin Brothers, 1889. American Antiquarian Society, Gift of Herbert H. Hosmer, 1978.

Cover design for The Night before Christmas. Watercolor, pen and ink, gouache, ca. 1888. American Antiquarian Society, Gift of Herbert H. Hosmer, 1978.

Radiant with Color & Art is co-curated by Laura Wasowicz, AAS curator of children’s literature and Lauren Hewes,  AAS Andrew W. Mellon Curator of Graphic Arts.

Images courtesy The Grolier Club.

David Hockney at The Met Fifth Avenue, November 27, 2017 – February 25, 2018

“For nearly sixty years, David Hockney (British, born 1937) has explored how to translate movement, space, and time into two dimensions, working across a wide range of media with equal measures of wit and intelligence. From his earliest engagements with modernist abstraction to his most recent, jewel-toned landscapes, Hockney has continued to challenge the protocols of picture-making, investigating the nature of vision and representation with both intellectual rigor and sheer delight in the act of looking.

Born in West Yorkshire, he moved to London in 1959 to study at the Royal College of Art. Upon graduation, Hockney had already garnered a national reputation. He left in 1963 for an auspicious visit to Southern California, where he has lived on and off for the past fifty years. Hockney’s willingness to flaunt conventions both societal and artistic has distinguished his career on both sides of the Atlantic. His works from the 1960s brazenly reference homoerotic subject matter, while his enduring dedication to figuration runs against the grain of predominant art-world trends.

Hockney is perhaps best known for his luminous depictions of California swimming pools and backyards in the mid-1960s. His paintings in the years that followed demonstrate an interest in social relations, and his experiments with illusion and realism reveal his rebellion against onepoint perspective. In recent years he has ventured outdoors to paint the changeable landscapes of his native Yorkshire, while simultaneously embracing new technologies such as the iPad, with its digital drawing tools. Now eighty years old, Hockney has returned again to Los Angeles and still paints daily. This exhibition assembles six decades of masterpieces from the artist’s career, including one finished just this past spring, in the fullest presentation to date.” — Introductory Wall Text

David Hockney. Flight Into Italy – Swiss Landscape, 1962. Oil on canvas. Museum Kunstpalast, Düsseldorf © David Hockney. Photo Credit: Prudence Cuming Associates

David Hockney. Cleaning Teeth, Early Evening (10 PM) W11, 1962. Oil on canvas.  Astrup Fearnley Collection, Oslo, Norway © David Hockney

David Hockney. Domestic Scene, Los Angeles, 1963. Oil on canvas. Private collection © David Hockney

David Hockney. California Art Collector, 1964. Acrylic on canvas. Collection of Giancarlo Giammetti, New York © David Hockney., Photo Credit: Richard Schmidt

David Hockney. Man in Shower in Beverly Hills, 1964. Acrylic on canvas. Tate, purchased 1980 © David Hockney. Photo Credit: ©Tate, London 2017

David Hockney. A Bigger Splash, 1967. Acrylic on canvas. Tate, purchased 1981 © David Hockney. Photo Credit: ©Tate, London 2017

David Hockney. Christopher Isherwood and Don Bachardy, 1968. Acrylic on canvas. Private collection © David Hockney

David Hockney. Henry Geldzahler & Christopher Scott, 1969. Acrylic on canvas. Collection of Barney A. Ebsworth © David Hockney, Photo credit: Richard Schmidt

David Hockney. Mr. and Mrs. Clark and Percy, 1970-1971. Acrylic on canvas. Tate, presented by the Friends of the Tate Gallery 1971 © David Hockney. Photo Credit: ©Tate, London 2017

David Hockney. Pool and Steps, Le Nid du Duc, 1971. Acrylic on canvas. Private collection © David Hockney

David Hockney. Portrait of an Artist (Pool with Two Figures), 1972. Acrylic on canvas. The Lewis Collection © David Hockney. Photo Credit: Art Gallery of New South Wales / Jenni Carter

David Hockney. Large Interior, Los Angeles, 1988. Oil, ink on cut-and-pasted paper, on canvas. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Purchase, Natasha Gelman Gift, in honor of William S. Lieberman, 1989 (1989.279) © David Hockney

David Hockney. A Closer Winter Tunnel, February – March 2006. Oil on canvas. Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney. Purchased with funds provided by Geoff and Vicki Ainsworth, the Florence and William Crosby Bequest and the Art Gallery of New South Wales Foundation, 2007 © David Hockney. Photo Credit: Richard Schmidt

David Hockney. Garden, 2015. Acrylic on canvas. Collection of the artist © David Hockney. Photo Credit: Richard Schmidt

David Hockney. A Bigger Interior with Blue Terrace and Garden, 2017. Acrylic on canvas. Collection of the artist © David Hockney. Photo Credit: Richard Schmidt

David Hockney is organized collaboratively by Tate Britain, London; the Centre Pompidou, Paris; and The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. At The Met, David Hockney is curated by Ian Alteveer, Curator, with assistance from Meredith Brown, Research Associate, both in the Department of Modern and Contemporary Art.

Images courtesy The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

In the Tower: Anne Truitt at National Gallery of Art, November 19, 2017 – April 1, 2018

“Anne Truitt was one of the leading figures associated with minimalism, the sculptural tendency that emerged in the 1960s featuring pared-down geometric shapes scaled to the viewer’s body and placed directly on the floor. Born in Baltimore in 1921, Truitt grew up in Easton, a town on Maryland’s Eastern Shore. After majoring in psychology at Bryn Mawr College and marrying the journalist James Truitt, she enrolled in studio classes at the Institute of Contemporary Arts in Washington, DC. Following sojourns in Dallas, New York, and San Francisco, Truitt settled in Washington in 1960. Apart from a stint in Tokyo, 1964–1967, the artist lived and worked in the District until her death in 2004, maintaining a succession of studios during a period when affordable space across the city was still available to artists. She saw her studio as a retreat where she could focus on her art, explaining, “In my studio I feel at home with myself, peaceful at heart, remote from the world, totally immersed in a process so absorbing as to be its own reward.”

Truitt’s art is unique within the field of minimalism; she alone remained a traditional studio artist. Whereas artists such as Donald Judd (1928–1994) and Carl Andre (b. 1935) abandoned the studio and enlisted industrial fabrication and materials, Truitt painted and sanded her wood sculptures by hand in multiple layers. And while many minimalists favored neutral tones, Truitt, in order to suffuse her work with memory and feeling, developed a daring palette that ranged from deep reds and blacks to pale yellows and lavenders. This exhibition, a survey of Truitt’s sculpture, painting, and works on paper from 1961 to 2002, traces the career of an artist who developed her work quietly and independently in the former carriage and row houses of this city.” — Introductory Wall Text

Anne Truitt (American, 1921 – 2004), Insurrection, 1962. Acrylic on wood, unframed: 100 1/2 x 42 x 16 in. (255.27 x 106.68 x 40.64 cm). National Gallery of Art, Washington, Corcoran Collection (Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Phillip Stern)

Anne Truitt. 26 December 1962 No. 1, 1962. Acrylic on heavy wove paper sheet: 55.88 × 76.2 cm (22 × 30 in.). National Gallery of Art, Washington, Corcoran Collection (Museum Purchase with the aid of funds from the National Endowment for the Arts and the William A. Clark Fund)

Anne Truitt, 26 December 1962 No. 5, 1962. Acrylic on heavy wove paper sheet: 55.88 × 76.2 cm (22 × 30 in.). National Gallery of Art, Washington, Corcoran Collection (Gift of the artist in memory of Gene Baro)

Anne Truitt, Untitled, 1968. Acrylic on paper, overall: 29.4 x 104.3 cm (11 9/16 x 41 1/16 in.). National Gallery of Art, Gift of the Woodward Foundation, Washington, D.C.

Anne Truitt, 1 June 1976, 1976. Acrylic paint and brush over pencil on matte-surfaced white poster board, unframed: 22 x 30 1/16 in. (55.88 x 76.36 cm). National Gallery of Art, Washington, Corcoran Collection (Exchange and gift of Ramon Osuna)

Installation view of In the Tower: Anne Truitt at National Gallery of Art

Anne Truitt. Knight’s Heritage, 1963. Acrylic on wood, overall: 153.35 x 153.35 x 30.48 cm (60 3/8 x 60 3/8 x 12 in.). National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of the Collectors Committee

Installation view of In the Tower: Anne Truitt at National Gallery of Art

Anne Truitt, Mid Day, 1972. Acrylic on wood, overall: 305.3 x 65 x 34.4 cm (120 3/16 x 25 9/16 x 13 9/16 in.). National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of Harry and Margery Kahn

Anne Truitt, Parva XII, 1977. Acrylic on wood, overall: 14.61 x 81.28 x 10.16 cm (5 3/4 x 32 x 4 in.). National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of Margot Wells Backas

Anne Truitt’s studio, Washington DC, 1979. (From left: Portal, 1978, Sentinel, 1978, Come Unto These Yellow Sands, 1979, Pilgrim, Nicea, 1977, Sand Child, 1979, Amica, 1979)

Anne Truitt in her Twining Court studio standing by her sculpture Tor, 1962

The exhibition is organized by the National Gallery of Art and curated by James Meyer, curator of art, 1945–1974, National Gallery of Art.

Images courtesy National Gallery of Art.

Laura Owens at Whitney Museum of American Art, through February 4, 2018

Photographs by Corrado Serra.

“For more than twenty years, Laura Owens has pioneered an irreverent and innovative approach to painting by challenging its conventions while remaining deeply committed to its visual and emotional possibilities. Owens (b. 1970) was raised in suburban Norwalk, Ohio, and pursued her graduate studies in Los Angeles, where she has lived since 1992. At that time, she recalls, her more theoretically minded professors and peers viewed painting with suspicion, but this skepticism freed her to experiment with the medium precisely by appearing not to take it too seriously. She brought cartoon doodling to rigorous abstraction, along with other traces of her self-described middlebrow upbringing, such as the pastel palettes and frothy surfaces of decorated cakes and kitschy greeting cards. Over the ensuing years, she has sampled imagery omnivorously, from medieval tapestries to emojis—all translated to canvas via a dazzling array of techniques, including gutsy brushstrokes, digital rendering, needlework, screenprinting, and folksy collage. For Owens, this heterogeneity serves as a feminist challenge to ingrained art historical hierarchies and traditional notions of good taste. Why can’t an ambitious painting, she asks, be sentimental, pink, or funny, or full of a mother’s experiences, animals, and googly eyes? Her work draws us in to throw us of, awakening our minds to the act of perception.

Throughout her career, Owens has shown a keen interest in how paintings invent spatial worlds while existing physically in the real one that they—and we—inhabit. Her often witty canvases depict pictures within pictures, sometimes mirroring one another, and have expanded to fll whole walls or rooms, unfurling across multiple panels that can be reconfgured depending upon where they hang. This survey of Owens’s paintings from 1994 to the present elaborates on that impulse through a loosely chronological sequence of freestanding rooms designed to evoke the spaces or exhibitions for which certain works were originally made. Each gallery serves as a discrete portal into a past moment, while also joining a conversation with works installed around it that engage the Museum’s larger architectural frame. Like Owens’s art, the exhibition proposes a vibrant experience of varying moods, imaginative conjecture, and poetic play.” — Introductory Wall Text

Untitled, 1996. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, gift of Norman Dubrow, 2015

Installation view of Laura Owens

Left: Untitled, 1997. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; promised gift of Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner. Right: Untitled, 1997. Ringier Collection

Installation view of Laura Owens

Installation view of Laura Owens

Left: Untitled, 2006. Private collection. Right: Untitled, 2002. Collection of David Teiger Trust

Left: Untitled, 2006. Collection of Florence and Philippe Ségalot. Center: Untitled, 2009. Collection of Beth Swofford. Right: Untitled, 2003. The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles

Left: Untitled, 2006. Collection of Martin and Rebecca Eisenberg. Right: Untitled, 2009. Collection of Maja Hoffmann/LUMA Foundation

Top: Detail of Untitled, 2012. Collection of Maja Hoffmann/LUMA Foundation. Bottom: Detail of Untitled, 2012. The Brant Foundation, Greenwich, Connecticut

Left: Untitled, 2012. Private collection. Center: Untitled, 2012. Ringier Collection. Right: Untitled, 2012.  Lambert Art Collection (LAC)

Left: Untitled, 2012. Tate: Presented by Sadie Coles Gallery 2015. Center: Untitled, 2012. Collection of the artist. Right: Untitled, 2012. Collection of Martin and Rebecca Eisenberg

Left: Untitled, 2016. Collection of the artist. Right: Untitled, 2016. Collection of the artist

Left: Detail of Untitled, 2014. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York. Right: Untitled, 2013. Maurice and Paul Marciano Art Foundation, Los Angeles

Left: Untitled, 2013. Maurice and Paul Marciano Art Foundation, Los Angeles. Right: Untitled, 2013. Ringier Collection

Installation view of Laura Owens

Left: Untitled, 2014. Collection of Jill and Peter Kraus. Center: Untitled, 2014. Collection of Catie and Donald Marron. Right: Untitled, 2013. Collection of Meir and Katya Teper

Front: Untitled, 2015. Collection of the artist; courtesy Capitain Petzel, Berlin

Back: Untitled, 2015. Collection of the artist; courtesy Capitain Petzel, Berlin

The exhibition is organized in close collaboration with the artist by Scott Rothkopf, Deputy Director for Programs and Nancy and Steve Crown Family Chief Curator, with Jessica Man, curatorial assistant.

Works & Process presents Peter & the Wolf with Isaac Mizrahi at Peter B. Lewis Theater, Guggenheim Museum, December 2 – 10, 2017

Works & Process, the Performing-Arts Series at the Guggenheim presents Sergei Prokofiev’s children’s classic Peter & the Wolf. Isaac Mizrahi conceived, directs, designs, and narrates Sergei Prokofiev’s charming children’s classic as Brad Lubman conducts Ensemble Signal and a cast performs choreography by John Heginbotham, bringing the 30-minute story to life for the young and young at heart.

In 1936, Sergei Prokofiev was commissioned to write a light-hearted piece for children that would introduce the instruments and sounds of the orchestra. He was given a libretto, but he didn’t like it, so he came up with a new story. The music was completed in a week. Peter & the Wolf was the result, and it is a work still loved by children and adults. The story tells how Peter, against his grandfather’s will, opens the park gate, ventures into the big green meadow, and ultimately manages to liberate the City from the scary wolf. Peter captures the wolf with the help of a bird, his friend, and hands him over to the hunter, with a specific request: to take the wolf to the zoo. Each character in the story is represented by an instrument. The narrator reads the story between the musical sections.

Each character in the story is represented by an instrument: Peter – strings, Grandfather – bassoon, Duck – oboe, Hunter – timpani, Bird – flute, Cat – clarinet and Wolf – french horn

Photos: Sergei Prokofiev’s Peter & the Wolf with Isaac Mizrahi. All Photographs: © 2016 Richard Termine, courtesy: Works & Process at the Guggenheim.

Obama: An Intimate Portrait by Pete Souza with Foreword by Barack Obama; Little, Brown and Company; November 7, 2017

Obama: An Intimate Portrait by Pete Souza, includes a foreword by President Obama, in which he writes, “Over those eight years, Pete became more than my photographer—he became a friend, a confidant, and a brother.” This is the definitive visual biography of the Obama presidency, including never-before-seen photos of the administration, the president, and his family. Souza’s photographs and poignant behind-the-scenes captions and stories that accompany them, communicate the pace and power of our nation’s highest office.

Of his time at the White House, Pete writes, “I have had the extraordinary privilege of being the man in the room for eight years, visually documenting President Obama for history. This book is the result of that effort; I gave it my all. I hope that the chronological photographs that follow, accompanied by my words, will show you the true character of this man and the essence of his Presidency, as seen through my eyes and felt through my heart.”

“This book depicts major milestones in the administration but also intimate personal moments that provide a deeper understanding of Barack Obama, not just as president but as a man. No White House photographer has ever been granted such access to a sitting president, and the result is a moving, comprehensive book full of more than 300 extraordinary photographs. The special relationship Pete forged with President Obama is apparent in these pages. Whether he was hanging back in a door frame, perched on a ladder to snag the perfect shot, or in a freight elevator with the president and the First Lady, his images reveal the undeniable trust between the commander in chief and his photographer.” — Little, Brown and Company

Book Jacket of Obama: An Intimate Portrait by Pete Souza, Chief Official White House Photographer

The President with the First Lady in a freight elevator heading to an inaugural ball, 11:00 p.m., January 10, 2009. “We were on a freight elevator headed to one of the Inaugural Balls. It was quite chilly, so the President removed his tuxedo jacket and put it over the shoulders of his wife. Then they had a semi-private moment as staff member and Secret Service agents tried not to look.” (Official White House photo by Pete Souza)

President Barack Obama meets with Prime Minister Putin at his dacha, Moscow, Russia. July 7, 2009. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

President Barack Obama waving farewell following his speech after departure ceremony at Accra airport in Ghana. July 11, 2009. (Official White House photo by Pete Souza)

President Barack Obama reacting from the bench at one of Sasha’s basketball games. The two coaches for her team—the Sidwell Friends Vipers—couldn’t make it to the game, so the President and Reggie Love filled in. February 5, 2011. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

President Barack Obama listening to Thelma “Maxine” Pippen McNair after signing H.R. 360, which provided for a Congressional gold medal to commemorate the four young African-American victims of the 1963 bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. McNair’s daughter, Denise McNair, was one of the victims. May 24, 2013. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

President Barack Obama talks with Chancellor Angela Merkel of Germany prior to a “family” group photo with G7 Summit leaders and outreach guests at Schloss Elmau in Krün, Germany, June 8, 2015. The President and Merkel formed a close relationship over the eight years they were both in office. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

President Barack Obama holds Ella Harper Rhodes, daughter of Ben Rhodes, Deputy National Security Advisor for Strategic Communications, as he lies on the floor in the Oval Office, Oct. 30, 2015. Ella is in her elephant costume for the White House Halloween celebration event. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

President Barack Obama in London meeting Prince George at Kensington Palace, April 22, 2016. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

President Barack Obama reading at the Resolute Desk in the Oval Office. During autumn and winter afternoons, the President’s desk was bathed in dramatic backlight. In the final months of the administration, I tried to capture the President in that special light because I knew I’d never have the chance again. October 14, 2016. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

Pete Souza presents Obama: An Intimate Portrait at National Museum of African American History and Culture, November 20, 2017. Photo by Corrado Serra for Arts Summary

After Pete Souza’s presentation, he was interviewed by Aaron Bryant, Curator of Photography, NMAAHC. Photo by Corrado Serra for Arts Summary

Title image: Presentation of Obama: An Intimate Portrait by Pete Souza at National Museum of African American History and Culture, November 20, 2017. Photo by Corrado Serra for Arts Summary.

Book images courtesy Little, Brown and Company.

Michelangelo: Divine Draftsman and Designer at The Met Fifth Avenue, November 13, 2017 – February 12, 2018

Michelangelo: Divine Draftsman and Designer presents a stunning range and number of works by the artist: 128 of his drawings, 3 of his marble sculptures, his earliest painting, and his wood architectural model for a chapel vault. A substantial body of complementary works by his teachers, associates, pupils, and artists who were influenced by him or who worked in collaboration with him are also displayed for comparison and context.

A towering genius in the history of Western art, Michelangelo was celebrated during his long life for the excellence of his disegno, the power of drawing and invention that provided the foundation for all of the arts. For his mastery of drawing, design, sculpture, painting, and architecture, he was called Il divino (“the divine one”) by his contemporaries. His powerful imagery and dazzling technical virtuosity transported viewers and imbued all of his works with a staggering force that continues to enthrall us today.” — The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Dr. Carmen C. Bambach, curator of the exhibition, commented: “This selection of more than 200 works will show that Michelangelo’s imagery and drawings still speak with an arresting power today. Five hundred years seem to melt away in looking at his art.”

Photographs by Corrado Serra.

Domenico Ghirlandaio (Domenico Bigordi). (Italian, Florence 1448/49– 1494 Florence). Drapery study of a standing figure. 1485-90. Gabinetto Disegni e Stampe degli Uffizi, Florence

Michelangelo Buonarroti (Italian, Caprese 1475–1564 Rome). The Torment of Saint Anthony, ca. 1487–88. Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth

Michelangelo Buonarroti. Unfinished cartoon for a Madonna and Child, 1525–30. Casa Buonarroti, Florence

Michelangelo Buonarroti. The Holy Family with Two Angels, mid 1520’s. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles.

Installation View of Michelangelo: Divine Draftsman and Designer

Michelangelo Buonarroti. Left: Young Man in Bust Length in Exotic Costume (the so-called Persian Boy), mid 1520-25. The Ashmolean Museum, Oxford. Right: Portrait of Andrea Quaratesi, 1532. The British Museum, London

Michelangelo Buonarroti. Male Torso (recto), 1524-25. Ashmolean Museum, Oxford

Daniele da Volterra (Daniele Ricciarelli) (Italian, Volterra 1509–1566 Rome). Michelangelo Buonarroti. Probably ca. 1544. The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Michelangelo and the carpenters of the Fabbrica di San Pietro in Vaticano. Model of the Vault of the Chapel of the King of France. Fabbrica di San Pietro in Vaticano, Vatican City

The Sweat of Their Face: Portraying American Workers at Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery, November 3 – September 3, 2018

“The National Portrait Gallery’s exhibition The Sweat of Their Face: Portraying American Workers presents nearly 100 portrayals of laborers by some of the nation’s most influential artists. The multifaceted exhibition includes paintings, sculptures, drawings, prints, media art and photographs that reveal how American workers have shaped and defined the United States over the course of its history—from the Colonial era to the present day.

The Sweat of Their Face includes portraits by Winslow Homer, Dorothea Lange, Elizabeth Catlett, Lewis Hine, Jacob Lawrence and other renowned American artists. Power House Mechanic, a photograph by Lewis Hine, and The Riveter, by Ben Shahn, are significant works in their own right, but they also highlight the artist’s ability to recognize the vast population of anonymous workers and the contributions that their subjects have made. Furthermore, those depicted in The Sweat of Their Face draw attention to the relationships that exist between the viewer, artist and subject, many of the people portrayed are anonymous workers.” — National Portait Gallery

Laborers and their work have been shaping this country since its inception. “In The Sweat of Their Face, we explore who works, why and how their surrounding conditions have changed and evolved over time,” said Kim Sajet, director of the National Portrait Gallery. “In the early years of the 21st century, crucial questions persist over issues of jobs and workers’ rights, as well as larger issues of economic equality and social mobility. As we grapple with these questions, we might reflect on the labor of the workers from past epochs who have been brought out of anonymity and given the fullness of their humanity by some of America’s great fine artists.”

Pat Lyon at the Forge by John B. Neagle. Oil on canvas, 1829. Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia; gift of the Lyon family (1842.1)

Old Mill (The Morning Bell) by Winslow Homer. Oil on canvas, 1871. Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Connecticut; bequest of Stephen Carlton Clark, B.A. 1903

Francis S. Chanfrau by Unidentified Artist. Pencil, ink and watercolor on paper, c. 1848. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.

News Boy by Henry Inman. Oil on canvas, 1841. Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy, Andover, Massachusetts, museum purchase (1955.14). Photo credit: Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy, Andover, MA / Art Resource, NY

Miss Breme Jones by John Rose. Watercolor and ink on paper, 1785-87. Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Museum, Williamsburg, Virginia; Museum purchase, the Friends of Colonial Williamsburg Collections Fund

African American Woman with two white children by Unidentified Artist. Quarter plate ambrotype, c. 1860. Promised gift of Paul Sack to the Sack Photographic Trust for the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art

Occupational portrait of a cooper by Unidentified Artist. Sixth plate daguerreotype, 1840-60. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

Girl with Pitchfork by Winslow Homer. Oil on canvas, 1867. The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C.

The Longshoremen’s Noon by John George Brown. Oil on canvas. 1879. National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.; Corcoran Collection (Museum purchase, Gallery Fund), 2014.136.2

Tommy (Holding His Bootblack Kit) by Jacob Riis. Modern gelatin silver print from dry plate negative, c. 1890 (printed from original negative, 1994). Museum of the City of New York, New York City; gift of Roger William Riis, 1990

The Clock Maker by Jefferson David Chalfant. Oil on copper, 1899. Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, California; gift of Mr. and Mrs. John D. Rockefeller 3rd

Child Labor, c. 1908 by Lewis Wickes Hine. Gelatin silver print, c. 1908. Bank of America Collection

Power House Mechanic by Lewis Wickes Hine. Gelatin silver print, 1920-21. Brooklyn Museum, New York; gift of Walter and Naomi Rosenblum (84.237.7)

Stoop Labor in Cotton Field, San Joaquin Valley, California by Dorothea Lange. Gelatin silver print on Masonite mount 1938. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, California (2000.50.11)

Workers on the Empire State Building by Lewis Wickes Hine. Gelatin silver print, c. 1930. Museum of Modern Art, New York City; Committee on Photography Fund; Digital image © The Museum of Modern Art / Licensed by SCALA / Art Resource, NY

Lathe operator machining parts for transport planes at the Consolidated Aircraft Corporation plant, Fort Worth, Texas by Howard R. Hollem. Digital inkjet print from 4 x 5 color transparency, 1942 (printed 2017). Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

Farm Couple at Work by William Henry Johnson. Oil on paperboard, c.1942-1944. Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, D.C.; gift of the Harmon Foundation

Washington, D.C. Government charwoman (American Gothic) by Gordon Parks. Gelatin silver print, 1942 (printed later). National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.; Corcoran Collection (The Gordon Parks Collection) Courtesy of and © The Gordon Parks Foundation

Mine America’s Coal by Norman Rockwell. Oil on canvas, 1944. Norman Rockwell Museum, Lenox, Massachusetts

Charlie Mah-Gow, Town’s First Restaurant Owner, Yellowknife, Canada by Gordon Parks. Gelatin silver print, 1945 (printed later). The Gordon Parks Foundation, Pleasantville, New York

Grape Picker, Berryessa Valley, California, 1956, from ‘Portfolio Two’ by Pirkle Jones. Gelatin silver print, 1956. Bank of America Collection © Special Collections, University Library, University of Santa Cruz: Pirkle Jones and Ruth-Marion Baruch Photographs

Cutting Squash (Leah Chase) by Gustave Blache III. Oil on panel, 2010. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of the artist in honor of Mr. Richard C. Colton, Jr., © Gustave Blache III

Woman Cleaning Shower in Beverly Hills (after David Hockney’s Man Taking Shower in Beverly Hills, 1964) by Ramiro Gomez. Acrylic on canvas, 2013. Private collection © Ramiro Gomez

The Sweat of Their Face is organized by curator of painting and sculpture, Dorothy Moss and historian emeritus, David C. Ward.

Images courtesy The National Portrait Gallery.