Devotion to Drawing: The Karen B. Cohen Collection of Eugène Delacroix at The Met Fifth Avenue, July 17 – November 12, 2018

“Renowned as a giant of French Romantic painting, Eugène Delacroix (1798–1863) was equally a dedicated and innovative draftsman. The Karen B. Cohen Collection of Eugène Delacroix, generously promised to The Met, presents the exceptional opportunity to examine the central role of drawing in the artist’s practice and the scope of his graphic production. 

Delacroix’s drawings remained largely unknown to the public during his lifetime. The thousands of sheets discovered in his studio upon his death revealed the extent of his devotion to the medium. The privacy of his drawing practice and the significance of these works in his formation and process make them vital to understanding the artist. 

This exhibition traces the variety of ways Delacroix used drawing throughout his career: to train his hand and eye through copying and direct observation of nature; to invent, research, and refine his ideas for paintings, public decorative programs, and prints; and to explore the expressive potential of his materials. 

Delacroix defies easy classification as a draftsman. He rejected the prevailing prescription for a singular method or ideal manner of drawing in favor of an individual approach. In their diversity, his drawings convey the liberating force of an artist whose inexhaustible ambition and curiosity fueled relentless invention.” — Introductory Wall Text

Two Studies of a Reclining Male Nude, after Théodore Gericault (recto); Figure Studies after Rubens’s “Fall of the Damned” (verso), ca. 1820–22. Graphite, pen and brown ink (recto); pen and brush and brown ink (verso). 10 in. × 13 1/16 in. (25.4 × 33.2 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Promised Gift from the Karen B. Cohen Collection of Eugène Delacroix, in honor of Clement C. Moore II.

Normandy Sketchbook, 1829. Graphite and watercolor on wove paper, period binding. 4 5/16 × 6 in. (11 × 15.2 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Promised Gift from the Karen B. Cohen Collection of Eugène Delacroix, in memory of Arthur G. Cohen.

Sunset, ca. 1850. Pastel on blue laid paper. 8 1/16 x 10 3/16 in. (20.4 x 25.9 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift from the Karen B. Cohen Collection of Eugène Delacroix, in honor of Philippe de Montebello, 2014.

Page from the Othello Sketchbook, 1855. Watercolor over graphite. 5 1/4 × 3 1/4 in. (13.3 × 8.3 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Promised Gift from the Karen B. Cohen Collection of Eugène Delacroix.

The Agony in the Garden, ca. 1849. Brush and brown and black wash. 4 7/16 × 7 5/8 in. (11.3 × 19.4 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Promised Gift from the Karen B. Cohen Collection of Eugène Delacroix.

Figure Studies, related to “Liberty Leading the People”, 1830. Pen and brown ink, brush and brown wash. 8 7/16 x 13 7/16 in. (21.5 x 34.2 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift from the Karen B. Cohen Collection of Eugène Delacroix, in honor of Keith Christiansen, 2013.

The Education of Achilles, ca. 1844. Graphite. 9 5/16 x 11 11/16 in. (23.6 x 29.7 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift from the Karen B. Cohen Collection of Eugène Delacroix, in honor of Emily Rafferty, 2014.

Hamlet Reproaches His Mother, ca. 1834. Graphite. 6 7/8 x 9 3/16 in. (17.5 x 23.3 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift from the Karen B. Cohen Collection of Eugène Delacroix, in memory of Lucien Goldschmidt, 2013.

Crouching Tiger, 1839. Pen and brush and iron gall ink. Overall: 5 3/16 x 7 3/8 in. (13.1 x 18.7 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift from the Karen B. Cohen Collection of Eugène Delacroix, in honor of Sanford I. Weill, 2013

Devotion to Drawing: The Karen B. Cohen Collection of Eugène Delacroix is organized by Ashley E. Dunn, Assistant Curator in The Met’s Department of Drawings and Prints.

Images courtesy The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

YU HANYU: Force of Nature, The Power of the Brush at Ethan Cohen Kunsthalle (KuBe) in Beacon, New York, July 14 – September 2, 2018

Photographs by Corrado Serra.

“A leading figure in the practice of Chinese landscape painting and calligraphy, Yu Han Yu has pioneered a visual vernacular that pushes the ancient art form into the 21st century – without losing touch with its origins. Based in Beijing, he is recognized as both a master of the genre and an experimental visionary, an explorer on land and on the paper. Yu’s ink paintings derive from direct contact with his subject matter: the mountainous regions of Tibet’s Qinghai Plateau, the sweeping peaks of Shangri-La, glacial cataracts and cosmic cloudscapes. Born in 1964, Yu graduated from Hubei Institute of Fine Arts in Wuhan and China Central Academy of Fine Arts in Beijing. He has travelled to Tibet on some 50 occasions in 13 years, often in strenuous conditions. Yu’s explosively jagged confluences of nature suggest his own struggle against the elements in creating his art while conveying the internecine struggle within nature’s fierce forces of creation.” — Ethan Cohen Gallery

Yu Hanyu

Yu Hanyu: Force of Nature, The Power of the Brush, a solo exhibition co-curated by Gan Yu and Ethan Cohen.

David Wojnarowicz: History Keeps Me Awake at Night at Whitney Museum of American Art, July 13 – September 30, 2018

Photographs by Corrado Serra.

“This exhibition is the first major, monographic presentation of the work of David Wojnarowicz (1954–1992) in over a decade. Wojnarowicz came to prominence in the East Village art world of the 1980s, actively embracing all media and forging an expansive range of work both fiercely political and highly personal. Although largely self-taught, he worked as an artist and writer to meld a sophisticated combination of found and discarded materials with an uncanny understanding of literary influences. First displayed in raw storefront galleries, his work achieved national prominence at the same moment that the AIDS epidemic was cutting down a generation of artists, himself included. This presentation  draws upon recently-available scholarly resources and the Whitney’s extensive holdings of Wojnarowicz’s work.” — Whitney Museum

David Wojnarowicz with Tom Warren, Self-Portrait of David Wojnarowicz, 1983–84. Collection of Brooke Garber Neidich and Daniel Neidich.

Installation view of Gallery 1

Center: Untitled (Green Head), 1982. Collection of Hal Bromm and Doneley Meris.

Installation view of Gallery 5

Left: The Newspaper as National Voodoo: A Brief History of the U.S.A., 1986. The Broad Art Foundation, Los Angeles. Right: History Keeps Me Awake at Night (For Rilo Chmielorz), 1986. Collection of John P. Axelrod.

Left: The Death of American Spirituality, 1987. Private collection. Right: Evolution, 1987. Collection of Brooke Garber Neidich and Daniel Neidich.

Mexican Crucifix, 1987. P.P.O.W., New York.

Left: Water, 1987. Collection of the Second Ward Foundation. Right: Earth, 1987. The Museum of Modern Art.

Left: Fire, 1987. The Museum of Modern Art. Right: Wind (For Peter Hujar), 1987. Collection of the Second Ward Foundation.

Installation view of Gallery 9

Left: Something from Sleep II, 1987–88. Collection of Steven Johnson and Walter Sudol; courtesy Second Ward Foundation. Right: Bad Moon Rising, 1989. Collection of Steven Johnson and Walter Sudol; courtesy Second Ward Foundation.

Installation view of Gallery 10

Installation view of Gallery 10

Installation view of Gallery 11

This exhibition is co-curated by David Kiehl, Curator Emeritus, and David Breslin, DeMartini Family Curator and Director of the Collection.

Pacha, Llaqta, Wasichay: Indigenous Space, Modern Architecture, New Art at Whitney Museum of American Art, July 13 – September 30, 2018

Pacha, Llaqta, Wasichay investigates the complex ways in which Indigenous American notions of construction, land, space, and cosmology are represented in contemporary art. The exhibition highlights the work of seven established and emerging Latinx artists based in the United States and Puerto Rico (Latinx is a gender-neutral term for people of Latin American heritage). These artists—william cordova, Livia Corona Benjamín, Jorge González, Guadalupe Maravilla, Claudia Peña Salinas, Ronny Quevedo, and Clarissa Tossin—are inspired by Indigenous thinking about the built environment and natural world; they employ a wide range of references, from vernacular adaptations of pre-Columbian temples to constellations as metaphors for migration routes.

Each of the three title words in Quechua, the Indigenous language most spoken today in the Americas, holds more than one meaning. Pacha denotes universe, time, space, nature, or world; llaqta signifiesplace, country, community, or town; and wasichay means to build or to construct a house. Reflecting the richness of these ideas, the works on view explore the conceptual frameworks inherited from, and still alive in, communities in Mexico, Central America, and South America that include the Quechua, Aymara, Maya, Aztec, and Taíno, among others. By preserving and foregrounding ancestral ideas that transcend the Western concept of architecture, and offering alternate ways to understand the environment around us, the artists in the exhibition challenge colonial legacies and the belief in modernism as the ultimate paradigm of development in the Americas. For them, Indigenous art and architecture remain very much part of—and relevant to—the present.” — Introductory Wall Text

Installation view of works by Livia Corona Benjamín. Photo by Corrado Serra for Arts Summary.

Installation view of works by Guadalupe Maravilla. Photo by Corrado Serra for Arts Summary.

Guadalupe Maravilla, Requiem for a border crossing of my undocumented father #3, 2016. Archival inkjet print, 20 x 30 in. Edition 1 of 5. Collection of the artist.

Claudia Peña Salinas, Cueyatl, 2017. Brass, dyed cotton, and concrete frog, 24 1/2 x 24 x 61 in. Collection of the artist, 2017.

Installation view. Photo by Corrado Serra for Arts Summary.

Ronny Quevedo, quipu, 2017. Screen print, contact paper, and enamel on paper, 44 x 38 in. Collection of the artist. Photo credit: Argenis Apolinario.

Clarissa Tossin, Ch’u Mayaa, 2017, production still. Choreography/Performer: Crystal Sepúlveda; Cinematography: Jeremy Glaholt. Originally commissioned and produced by the City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs for the exhibition “Condemned to be Modern” as part of Getty’s “Pacific Standard Time:LA/LA.” Courtesy the artist.

Clarissa Tossin, A two-headed serpent held in the arms of human beings, or, Ticket Window, 2017. Silicone, walnut, faux terracotta (dyed plaster), 46 x 53 1/2 x 5 in. Collection of the artist; Courtesy of Commonwealth and Council, Los Angeles.

Left: Clarissa Tossin, Ha’ K’in Xook, from Piedras Negras to Hill Street, 2017. Photo by Corrado Serra for Arts Summary.

This exhibition is organized by Marcela Guerrero, assistant curator, with Alana Hernandez, curatorial project assistant.

Art as a revelation. From the Luigi and Peppino Agrati Collection at Gallerie d’Italia, through August 19, 2018

“In November 1970, as Christo removed the white cloths used to wrap the Monument of Vittorio Emanuele II in Piazza del Duomo in order to cover up the Monument to Leonardo da Vinci in Piazza della Scala on what is now recognised as a historic moment for Milanese contemporary art, Luigi and Peppino Agrati were among those who witnessed the event first-hand, soon contacting the artist to commission a number of installations for the garden of their villa. The Agrati brothers, prominent entrepreneurs, shared the same insight and subtle feeling for art, and were able to grasp the underlying depths of the images that were contributing to ‘build’ their time.

This exhibition features a representative selection of both Italian and American works from the collection generously and foresightedly donated to the Intesa Sanpaolo banking group by Luigi Agrati. It begins with a large nucleus of sculptures by Fausto Melotti, which forms the core of the show, continuing with masterpieces by Lucio Fontana, Alberto Burri, Yves Klein, and Piero Manzoni before delving deeper into the painting of Italy’s Nuova Figurazione, or ‘New Figuration’ movement, with works by Jannis Kounellis and Mario Schifano among others, then going right to the roots of the nascent Arte Povera movement revealed through the explorations of Piero Gilardi, Luciano Fabro, Mario Merz, and Giulio Paolini. 

Thanks to their typically entrepreneurial curiosity and their uncommon ability to penetrate beneath the surface of things, Luigi and Peppino Agrati built up a collection representing the wide range of interests involved in their experience of contemporary art. Their discovery of American art, which expanded along with their growing relations in the United States, resulted in the acquisition of works by the leading artists of the Pop Art movement – including the monumental Triple Elvis by its figurehead Andy Warhol – as well as of minimalist pieces like the large fluorescent installation dedicated to Peppino Agrati by Dan Flavin. The collection forms a complex constellation where Italian art is joined by the extraordinary works of Robert Rauschenberg – extensively collected from the late 1960s until the 1980s – of Cy Twombly, the original mediator between American and Italian culture, and of conceptual artists like Bruce Nauman and Joseph Kosuth whose studies of language form a dialogue with the language-based works by Alighiero Boetti and Vincenzo Agnetti. 

As it introduces the public to these works for the first time, the exhibition evokes the approach of the collection, which is conceived as a revelation, an enrichment, as a way of sharing a possible world of images encapsulating both contemporary existence and the intensity of Luigi and Peppino Agrati’s love of art.” — Introductory Text, Gallerie d’Italia  

Fausto Melotti (Rovereto 1901 – Milano 1986). Gli specchi (The Mirrors) , 1975. Brass, 40 x 91 x 7,5 cm. Collezione Luigi e Peppino Agrati © Fausto Melotti by SIAE 2018

Christo (Christo Javacheff), Gabrovo, 1935. Curtains for P. Agrati’s Garden, 1970. Matita nera, matite colorate, tela su carta, 70 x 55 cm. Collezione Luigi e Peppino Agrati

Christo (Christo Javacheff), Gabrovo, 1935. Wrapped Monument to Vittorio Emanuele (Project for Piazza del Duomo, Milano), 1970. Pencil, coloured pencil, canvas, cord, road map, photo on fibreboard

Mario Merz (Milano 1925 – Torino 2003). Senza titolo (Untitled), 1968. Black felt-pen, metallic mesh, clay, oil, paper on board, 54 x 73 cm. Collezione Luigi e Peppino Agrati

Michelangelo Pistoletto (Biella 1933). Uomo che aggiusta un camion (Man Repairing a Van), 1967. Painted tissue paper, polished mirror-finish stainless steel , 230 x 120 cm. Collezione Luigi e Peppino Agrati

Mario Schifano (Homs 1934 – Roma 1998). Grande pittura (Great Painting), 1963. Enamel and graphite on paper applied onto canvas, 260 x 150 cm. Collezione Luigi e Peppino Agrati

Jannis Kounellis (Pireo, Atene, 1936 – Roma, 2017). Senza titolo (Untitled), 1960. Oil on canvas, 150 x 250 cm. Collezione Luigi e Peppino Agrati © Jannis Kounellis by SIAE 2018

Giulio Paolini (Genova 1940). Senza titolo (Untitled), 1961. Jute, polythene, cord, frame, 120 x 150 cm. Collezione Luigi e Peppino Agrati

Alberto Burri (Città di Castello 1915 – Nizza 1995). Bianco Rosso (White Red), 1954. Burlap, fabric, oil, pumice, canvas, Vinavil glue on pressed cardboard, 75 x 59 cm. Collezione Luigi e Peppino Agrati Fondazione Palazzo Albizzini-Collezione Burri, Città di Castello © by SIAE 2018

Lucio Fontana (Rosario di Santa Fé 1899 – Comabbio 1968). Concetto spaziale (Spatial Concept), 1957. Aniline dye and collage on perforated canvas, 250 x 200 cm. Collezione Luigi e Peppino Agrati © Fondazione Lucio Fontana, Milano by SIAE 2018

Piero Manzoni (Soncino 1933 – Milano 1963). Achrome, 1961. Artificial fibre (glass wool), 100 x 80 x 20 cm. Collezione Luigi e Peppino Agrati

Enrico Castellani (Castelmassa 1930 – Celleno 2017). Superficie bianca. Dittico (White Surface. Diptych), 1967. Tempera on convex, concave, and shaped canvas, 120 x 150 cm. Collezione Luigi e Peppino Agrati

Alighiero Boetti (Turin 1940–Rome 1994). Ononimo, 1973. Red ball pen on carboard 11 elements

Dan Flavin (Jamaica, New York 1933 – Riverhead, New York 1996). Untitled (to Giuseppe Agrati), 1968. Yellow fluorescent lights, 122 x 335 cm. Collezione Luigi e Peppino Agrati

Andy Warhol (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 1928 – New York 1987). Triple Elvis, 1963. Acrylic and silkscreen on canvas, 208 x 152 cm. Collezione Luigi e Peppino Agrati © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts Inc. by SIAE 2018

Robert Rauschenberg (Port Arthur, Texas 1925 – Captiva, Florida 2008). Trasmettitore Argento Glut (Neapolitan) [Silver Transmitter Glut (Neapolitan)], 1987. Metal and number plate assemblage, 249 x 320 x 32 cm. Collezione Luigi e Peppino Agrati © Robert Rauschenberg Foundation by SIAE 2018

Jean-Michel Basquiat (Brooklyn 1960 – New York 1988). Financial District, 1985. Acrylic, oil on canvas, 163 x 142 cm. Collezione Luigi e Peppino Agrati © The Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat by SIAE 2018

Art as a revelation is at Gallerie d’Italia – Piazza Scala, Intesa Sanpaolo museum complex in Milan. The exhibition project was headed by Luca Massimo Barbero, with Gianfranco Brunelli as the general coordinator.

Images courtesy Gallerie d’Italia.

John Bock: The Next Quasi-Complex at Fondazione Prada, July 18 – September 24, 2018

“Conceived by the German artist John Bock (Gribbohm, 1965; lives and works in Berlin) for the Podium exhibition space, the project reflects his own practice that freely employs performative elements with audience engagement, installation, environment among others. His performances, called “lectures” by the artist himself, parody academic presentations and didactic methods. They are enacted in environments crafted from everyday objects, found materials, detritus, furniture etc., arranged to create a deliberately absurdist, or illogical universe. During his live events, visitors are involved in an experiential and participatory relationship with the artist.

For this new project, Bock transforms the ground floor of the Podium into his own eccentric and surreal world, a theatre of the absurd intermingliming dark comedy with disciplines such as philosophy, economics, music, fashion as well as fragments of daily life, altogether overcoming the conventions of contemporary art.

At the center of this new exhibition project are two large installations from the Collezione Prada: the mobile stage of When I’m looking into the Goat Cheese Baiser  (2001) and the living room of Lütte mit Rucola  (2006). Incorporating new experimental architectures, fragmentary walls, make-shift structures and a selection of existing artworks, the project takes the form of a circular path leaving a small plaza in its midst.” — Fondazione Prada

John Bock, Lütte mit Rucola, 2006. Installation with video. Photo: Jan Windszus © John Bock 2006.

John Bock, When I’m looking into the Goat Cheese baiser, 2001. Installation with video. Photo: Knut Klaßen © 2001 John Bock

Images courtesy Fondazione Prada.

Rembrandt: Britain’s Discovery of the Master at Scottish National Gallery, July 7 – October 14, 2018

“Britain’s love affair with one of history’s greatest artists will be explored in the major Festival exhibition at the Scottish National Gallery this summer. Rembrandt: Britain’s Discovery of the Master is the first exhibition to tell the exceptionally rich story of how Rembrandt’s work in Britain has enraptured and inspired collectors, artists and writers over the past 400 years. This major new exhibition, which will only be shown in Edinburgh, will bring together key works by Rembrandt which remain in British collections, as well as treasures that have left the country. Some of the exhibits have never been on public display before, while others return to Britain for the first time in decades, some after even a century or more.

The genius of Rembrandt (1606-69) is so universally admired, and his imagery so ubiquitous, that he has become a global brand like few other artists in history; yet no nation has demonstrated such a passionate, and sometimes eccentric, enthusiasm for Rembrandt’s (or indeed any artist’s) works. As a result, there is a wealth of paintings, drawings and prints by Rembrandt in British collections, and the number of his works that have been here at some point in their history is staggering, surpassing any other country apart from the Netherlands, where they originated.” — Scottish National Gallery

Rembrandt van Rijn (1606-69). Belshazzar’s Feast, c.1635. Oil on canvas, 167.6 x 209.2 cm.  Collection: National Gallery, London Bought with a contribution from The Art Fund, 1964.

Rembrandt van Rijn (1606-69). A Woman in Bed, about 1645 – 1646. Oil on canvas, 81.1 x 67.8 cm. Collection: National Galleries of Scotland, presented by William McEwan 1892. Photo: Antonia Reeve

Rembrandt van Rijn (1606-69). Landscape with the Rest on the Flight into Egypt, 1647. Oil on wood panel, 34 x 48 cm. Collection: National Gallery of Ireland, Dublin, purchased, 1883

Rembrandt van Rijn (1606-69) The Mill, 1645/1648 Oil on canvas, 87.6 x 105.6 cm Collection: National Gallery of Art, Washington, USA Widener Collection

Rembrandt van Rijn (1606-69). A Man in Armour (‘Achilles’), 1655. Oil on canvas, 137.5 x 104.4 cm. Collection: Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum Glasgow Life (Glasgow Museums) on behalf of Glasgow City Council, Glasgow

Christopher Baker, Director, European and Scottish Art and Portraiture at National Galleries of Scotland, said: “This exhibition provides an extraordinary opportunity to study the staggering range of Rembrandt’s achievement and its profound impact on British taste and art. Featuring both major international loans and many less well-known rarities, it tells a riveting story. From the collectors of the artist’s own life time in the seventeenth century to today’s painters, Rembrandt has cast a spell on the British imagination. It’s a tale of scholarship and money, of privilege and popularity – and it’s all laid out exclusively in Edinburgh this summer!”

Images courtesy Scottish National Gallery.

Obsession: Nudes by Klimt, Schiele, and Picasso from the Scofield Thayer Collection at The Met Breuer, July 3 – October 7, 2018

“Scofield Thayer (1889–1982) was editor and co-owner of the Dial, a journal that published writing and art by the European and American avant-garde (many of whom are pictured nearby) from 1919 to 1926. An aesthete, he was a brilliant abstract thinker and a complex, conflicted personality. In the early 1920s, Thayer underwent psychoanalysis with Sigmund Freud in Vienna. While in Europe, he assembled a large collection of some six hundred artworks—mostly works on paper—with staggering speed, acquiring them from artists and dealers in Vienna, London, Paris, and Berlin. 

While Pablo Picasso’s work had been shown in America, Gustav Klimt and Egon Schiele were unknown in this country at that time. Both artists were remarkable for their frank portrayals of female nudity and sexuality. Indifferent to cultural norms, they were committed to capturing exactly what they saw in its stark, unadorned, and, to some, shocking essence. 

In 1924 a selection from Thayer’s collection was exhibited at a New York gallery and won acclaim, but it found little favor when shown in his native city of Worcester, Massachusetts. Offended by intolerant views toward provocative art, Thayer drew up his will in 1925, leaving his collection to The Met before retreating from public life until his death in 1982. An exhibition of the bequest has been planned since its arrival at the Museum in 1984, but its diversity, unevenness, and vast quantity proved a challenge. While a select group of paintings by artists of the School of Paris is always on view, the light-sensitive watercolors, drawings, and prints have been rarely displayed. This exhibition, held on the centenary of the 1918 deaths of Klimt and Schiele, presents these erotic and evocative works together for the first time.” — Introductory Wall Text

Gustav Klimt, (Austrian 1862–1918). Reclining Nude, ca. 1913. Graphite, 14 7/8 x 22 1/2 in. (37.8 x 57.2 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Bequest of Scofield Thayer, 1982

Gustav Klimt, (Austrian, 1862–1918). Two Studies for a Crouching Woman, 1914–15. Graphite on paper. Sheet: 21 1/2 × 13 7/8 in. (54.6 × 35.2 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Bequest of Scofield Thayer, 1982

Gustav Klimt, (Austrian, 1862–1918). Reclining Nude with Drapery, Back View, 1917–1918. Graphite, 14 5/8 x 22 3/8 in. (37.1 x 56.8 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Bequest of Scofield Thayer, 1982

Egon Schiele, (Austrian, 1890–1918). Self-Portrait, 1911. Watercolor, gouache, and graphite on paper, 20 1/4 x 13 3/4 in. (51.4 x 34.9 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Bequest of Scofield Thayer, 1982

Egon Schiele, (Austrian, 1890–1918). Standing Nude with Orange Drapery, 1914. Watercolor, gouache and graphite on paper, 18 1/4 x 12 in. (46.4 x 30.5 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Bequest of Scofield Thayer, 1982

Egon Schiele, (Austrian, 1890–1918). Standing Nude in Black Stockings, 1917. Watercolor and charcoal on paper, 18 1/8 x 11 5/8 in. (46 x 29.5 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Bequest of Scofield Thayer, 1982

Pablo Picasso, (Spanish, 1881–1973). Youth in an Archway, 1906. Conté crayon on paper, 23 1/4 x 16 3/4 in. (59.1 x 42.5 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Bequest of Scofield Thayer, 1982 © 2018 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Pablo Picasso, (Spanish, 1881–1973). Three Bathers by the Shore, 1920. Graphite on paper, 19 3/8 x 25 1/4 in. (49.2 x 64.1 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Bequest of Scofield Thayer, 1982 © 2018 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Pablo Picasso, (Spanish, 1881–1973). Head of a Woman, 1922. Chalk on paper. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Bequest of Scofield Thayer, 1982 © 2018 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Title photo by Corrado Serra for Arts Summary.

Obsession: Nudes by Klimt, Schiele and Picasso from the Scofield Thayer Collection is organized by Sabine Rewald, the Jacques and Natasha Gelman Curator for Modern Art in the Department of Modern and Contemporary Art at The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Gala Salvador Dalí. A Room of One’s Own in Púbol at Museu Nacional d’Art de Catalunya, Barcelona, July 5 – October 14, 2018

“With this exhibition, the Museu Nacional d’Art de Catalunya and Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí intend to reveal Gala: muse, artist and a key figure in twentieth-century art. Companion to Dalí and before that, to the poet Paul Éluard, admired sometimes, sometimes ignored or slighted, Gala is undoubtedly a key figure of the vanguards. Without her, the surrealist playing board is missing a piece. Paintings by Max Ernst, photographs by Man Ray and Cecil Beaton and especially the works by Salvador Dalí are much more than portraits: they make up an autobiographical journey where, as a postmodernism heroine, Gala imagined and created her own image.

Moreover, this exhibition will also allow us to follow Salvador Dalí’s evolution as a painter and brings together a significant collection of his works, some 60 in total, including oil paintings and drawings. The exhibition will also present a selection of paintings, drawings and photographs by other artists who were part of the surrealist universe, such as Max Ernst, Picasso, Man Ray, Cecil Beaton and Brassaï. An interesting collection of letters, postcards and books will also be on display for the first time, as well as dresses and objects from Gala’s personal boudoir. In total, the exhibition will present approximately 180 pieces that reconstruct Gala’s complex and fascinating character.

The exhibition will unveil a Gala who camouflaged herself as a muse while forging her own path as an artist: she writes, imagines and creates her own image, in addition to playing an essential role in Dalí’s artistic development.” — Museu Nacional d’Art de Catalunya

Salvador Dalí. Gala Placidia. Galatea of the Spheres, 1952. Fundació Gala- Salvador Dalí, Figueres © Salvador Dalí, Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, VEGAP, Barcelona, 2018.

Dalí Seen from the Back Painting Gala from the Back Eternalized by Six Virtual Corneas Provisionally Reflected by Six Real Mirrors. Stereoscopic work, 1972-1973. © Salvador Dalí, Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, Figueres, 2017

Salvador Dalí. Dream Caused by the Flight of a Bee Around a Pomegranate One Second Before Awakening, c. 1944. Museo Nacional Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid. © Salvador Dalí, Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, VEGAP, Barcelona, 2018

André Caillet. Gala with hat shoe. © Salvador Dalí, Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, 2018

Eric Schaal © Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, Figueres, 2018. © Salvador Dalí, Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, 2018

Exhibition is organized and produced by Museu Nacional d’Art de Catalunya, Barcelona, and Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí. Curated by Estrella de Diego, professor of Art History (UCM)

Images courtesy Museu Nacional d’Art de Catalunya.

Sense of Humor: Caricature, Satire, and the Comical from Leonardo to the Present at National Gallery of Art, July 15, 2018 – January 6, 2019

“Prints and drawings have consistently served as popular media for humor in art. Prints, which can be widely replicated and distributed, are ideal for institutional mockery and social criticism, while drawings, unmediated and private, allow for free rein of the imagination. Sense of Humor will celebrate the rich yet often overlooked tradition of humor in works on paper, ranging from the 15th to 20th century. The exhibition is organized broadly chronologically, tracing the variety of forms that comical prints and drawings have taken over time, from Renaissance caricature to British satire in the 18th century and counterculture comics of the late 1960s. Drawn entirely from the Gallery’s collection, works are by artists including Pieter Bruegel the Elder, Jacques Callot, William Hogarth, Francisco de Goya, Honoré Daumier, George Herriman, Alexander Calder, Roger Brown, the Guerrilla Girls, and Art Spiegelman. Many works will be shown for the first time.” — National Gallery of Art

“Humor is a fundamental element of the human experience, and has too often been overlooked in the history of art,” said Earl A. Powell III, director, National Gallery of Art, Washington. “This exhibition takes a closer look at the many ways comedic works of art—specifically works on paper—have been used to elicit a laugh, make a critique, or reveal a truth. This exhibition would truly not have been possible without the extraordinary depth and breadth of our collection of prints and drawings.”

Richard Hamilton, The critic laughs, 1968. Laminated photo-offset color lithograph, screen print from one stencil, enamel paint, with collage. National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of William M. Speiller

Robert Crumb (artist, author), Apex Novelties (publisher), Zap #1, 1968. 28-page paperback bound volume with half-tone and offset lithograph illustrations in black and cover in full color, sheet: 24.13 x 17.15 cm (9 1/2 x 6 3/4 in.), open: 24.13 x 34.29 cm (9 1/2 x 13 1/2 in.). National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of William and Abigail Gerdts

Roger Brown, The Jim and Tammy Show, 1987. Color lithograph on wove paper, sheet: 55.25 x 81.92 cm (21 3/4 x 32 1/4 in.). National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of Bob Stana and Tom Judy

Guerrilla Girls, The Advantages of Being a Woman Artist, 1988. Offset lithograph in black on wove paper, overall: 43.2 x 56 cm (17 x 22 1/16 in.). National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of the Gallery Girls in support of the Guerrilla Girls

Francesco Melzi after Leonardo da Vinci. Two Grotesque Heads, pen and brown ink, overall (approximate): 4.5 x 9.9 cm (1 3/4 x 3 7/8 in.). National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of Mrs. Edward Fowles

Pieter van der Heyden after Pieter Bruegel the Elder. The Ass at School, 1557. Engraving, sheet (trimmed to plate mark): 23.6 x 30.4 cm (9 5/16 x 11 15/16 in.). National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of Mrs. Jane C. Carey as an addition to the Addie Burr Clark Memorial Collection

Jacques Callot, Gobbi and Other Bizarre Figures, 1616/1617. Pen and iron gall ink with a partial sketch in graphite at upper left on laid paper, overall: 12 x 14.1 cm (4 3/4 x 5 9/16 in.). National Gallery of Art, Washington, Ailsa Mellon Bruce Fund

Jusepe de Ribera, The Drunken Silenus, 1628. Etching on laid paper, sheet (cut within platemark): 27.2 x 35.3 cm (10 11/16 x 13 7/8 in.). National Gallery of Art, Washington, Patrons’ Permanent Fund

Rembrandt van Rijn, Self-Portrait in a Cap: Laughing, 1630. Etching sheet (trimmed to plate mark): 5.3 x 4.4 cm (2 1/16 x 1 3/4 in.). National Gallery of Art, Washington, Rosenwald Collection

William Hogarth, Strolling Actresses Dressing in a Barn, 1738. Etching and engraving, sheet: 46.7 x 62.8 cm (18 3/8 x 24 3/4 in.). National Gallery of Art, Washington, Rosenwald Collection

Giovanni Francesco Costa, Scholars Consulting Books and a Globe, c. 1747. Etching, hand-colored with watercolor and gouache, on laid paper, plate: 20.4 x 29.7 cm (8 1/16 x 11 11/16 in.), sheet: 23.2 x 33.1 cm (9 1/8 x 13 1/16 in.). National Gallery of Art, Washington, New Century Fund

James Gillray, Wierd-Sisters; Ministers of Darkness; Minions of the Moon, 1791. Etching, engraving and aquatint printed in sepia on wove paper, with publisher’s hand-coloring and inscriptions by Gillray, plate: 24.9 x 35.1 cm (9 13/16 x 13 13/16 in.), sheet: 26.9 x 37.9 cm (10 9/16 x 14 15/16 in.). National Gallery of Art, Washington, Anonymous Gift

Francisco de Goya, Ya van desplumados (There They Go Plucked), 1797/1798. Etching, burnished aquatint and drypoint [working proof, before letters], plate: 21.6 x 15.2 cm (8 1/2 x 6 in.), sheet: 26.3 x 20 cm (10 3/8 x 7 7/8 in.). National Gallery of Art, Washington, Rosenwald Collection

Francisco de Goya, Los caprichos (first edition), published 1799. 1 vol: 80 etchings, aquatints, drypoints, and burins. National Gallery of Art, WashingtonRosenwald Collection

The exhibition is organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington. It is curated by Jonathan Bober, Andrew W. Mellon Senior Curator of Prints and Drawings; Judith Brodie, curator and head of the department of American and modern prints and drawings; and Stacey Sell, associate curator, department of old master drawings, all National Gallery of Art, Washington.

Images courtesy National Gallery of Art.

Sally Mann: A Thousand Crossings at Peabody Essex Museum, June 30 – September 23, 2018

“The Peabody Essex Museum (PEM) presents the first international traveling exhibition of work by Sally Mann (b. 1951), one of the country’s most influential and distinguished photographers. For more than 40 years, Mann has made experimental, intimate and hauntingly beautiful photographs that explore such themes as the bonds of family, the nature of memory, the pull of place and the ravages of time and mortality. What unites her vision is that it is all bred of a place, the American South. Organized by the Peabody Essex Museum and the National Gallery of Art, Washington, Sally Mann: A Thousand Crossings brings together some 115 photographs, many of which have never been exhibited or published before. The exhibition reveals how Mann’s relationship with her native land — a place rich in literary and artistic traditions but troubled by history — has shaped her work.” — PEM

“Mann’s drive to face the big themes head on — death, war, race, love, the process of growing up — coupled with her extraordinary ability to wrest powerful emotional resonance from the materials of her art make her one of today’s most compelling photographers,” said curator Sarah Kennel. “The breadth and depth of her achievement, the seductive beauty of her photographs and her capacity to simultaneously explore the intimate and the universal reveal an artist at the apex of her powers.”

Sally Mann (American, born 1951), Easter Dress, 1986, gelatin silver print, Patricia and David Schulte. Image © Sally Mann.

Sally Mann (American, born 1951), The Ditch, 1987, gelatin silver print, The Art Institute of Chicago, Gift of Sally Mann and Edwynn Houk Gallery. Image © Sally Mann.

Sally Mann (American, born 1951), Bean’s Bottom, 1991, silver dye bleach print, Private collection. Image © Sally Mann.

Sally Mann (American, born 1951), On the Maury, 1992, gelatin silver print, Private collection. Image © Sally Mann.

Sally Mann, (American, born 1951), Deep South, Untitled (Stick), 1998, gelatin silver print, printed 1999 New Orleans Museum of Art, Collection of H. Russell Albright, M.D.. Image © Sally Mann.

Sally Mann (American, born 1951), Deep South, Untitled (Scarred Tree), 1998, gelatin silver print, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Alfred H. Moses and Fern M. Schad Fund. Image © Sally Mann.

Sally Mann (American, born 1951), Semaphore, 2003, gelatin silver print, The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Museum purchase, 2010.264. Image © Sally Mann.

Sally Mann (American, born 1951), The Turn, 2005, gelatin silver print, Private collection. Image © Sally Mann.

Sally Mann (American, born 1951), Blackwater 25, 2008- 2012, Tintype, Collection of the artist. Image © Sally Mann.

Sally Mann (American, born 1951), Oak Hill Baptist 01:01, 2008-2016, gelatin silver print, Collection of the artist. Image © Sally Mann.

Sally Mann (American, born 1951), Hatton Pond Baptist 04:01, 2008-2016, gelatin silver print, Collection of the artist. Image © Sally Mann.

R. Kim Rushing, Sally with camera (c. 1998). Gelatin silver print. Collection of Sally Mann. Image © R. Kim Rushing.

Images courtesy Peabody Essex Museum.

African American Portraits: Photographs from the 1940s and 1950s at The Met Fifth Avenue, June 26 – October 8, 2018

This exhibition presents more than one hundred fifty studio portraits of African Americans from the mid-twentieth century, a time of war, middle-class growth, and seismic cultural change. The photographs generally feature sitters in a frontal pose against a painted studio backdrop—soldiers and sailors (men and women) model their uniforms, graduates wear their caps and gowns, lovers embrace, and new parents cradle their infants. Both photographers and subjects remain mostly unidentified. 

While The Met collection includes important portraits from the beginnings of photography in the 1840s to the present, the Museum has until recently acquired few likenesses of African Americans. The exhibition features acquisitions from 2015 and 2017 that are part of an initiative, long overdue, to build such a collection. 

The poignancy of these intimate photographs lies in the essential respect the camera offers its subjects, who sit for their portraits as an act of self-expression. Their presentation here is inspired by a lecture by Frederick Douglass, “Pictures and Progress,” first given in 1861. In it, the passionate abolitionist orator and former enslaved person highlighted the importance of photographic portraits to African American identity and self-empowerment. Believed to be the most photographed American in the nineteenth century, Douglass argued that African Americans needed to make “ourselves objective to ourselves,” because without positive self-representation there would be no freedom.” — Introductory Wall Text

“The process by which man is able to possess his own subjective nature outside of himself—giving it form, color, space, and all the attributes of distinct personalities so that it becomes the subject of distinct observation and contemplation—is at bottom of all effort and the germinating principle of all reform and all progress.” — Frederick Douglass, “Pictures and Progress,” 1861/65

PDQ Camera (Model G), 1930s-50s. Installation photo by Corrado Serra for Arts Summary.

Installation photo by Corrado Serra for Arts Summary.

Installation photo by Corrado Serra for Arts Summary.

Installation photo by Corrado Serra for Arts Summary.

Unknown American maker. Studio Portrait, 1940s–50s. Gelatin silver prints. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Twentieth-Century Photography Fund, 2015, 2017. Image courtesy The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Unknown American maker. Studio Portrait, 1940s–50s. Gelatin silver prints. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Twentieth-Century Photography Fund, 2015, 2017. Image courtesy The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Daisy Studio (American, active 1940s). Studio Portrait, 1940s–50s. Gelatin silver prints. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Twentieth-Century Photography Fund, 2015, 2017. Image courtesy The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Unknown American maker. Studio Portrait, 1940s–50s. Gelatin silver prints. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Twentieth-Century Photography Fund, 2015, 2017. Image courtesy The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Unknown American maker. Studio Portrait, 1940s–50s. Gelatin silver prints. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Twentieth-Century Photography Fund, 2015, 2017. Image courtesy The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Unknown American maker. Studio Portrait, 1940s–50s. Gelatin silver prints. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Twentieth-Century Photography Fund, 2015, 2017. Image courtesy The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Unknown American maker. Studio Portrait, 1940s–50s. Gelatin silver prints. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Twentieth-Century Photography Fund, 2015, 2017. Image courtesy The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Daisy Studio (American, active 1940s). Studio Portrait, 1940s–50s. Gelatin silver prints. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Twentieth-Century Photography Fund, 2015, 2017. Image courtesy The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Unknown American maker. Studio Portrait, 1940s–50s. Gelatin silver prints. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Twentieth-Century Photography Fund, 2015, 2017. Image courtesy The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Unknown American maker. Studio Portrait, 1940s–50s. Gelatin silver prints. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Twentieth-Century Photography Fund, 2015, 2017. Image courtesy The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Daisy Studio (American, active 1940s). Studio Portrait, 1944. Gelatin silver prints. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Twentieth-Century Photography Fund, 2015, 2017. Image courtesy The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Daisy Studio (American, active 1940s). Studio Portrait, 1942. Gelatin silver prints. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Twentieth-Century Photography Fund, 2015, 2017. Image courtesy The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Unknown American maker. Studio Portrait, 1940s–50s. Gelatin silver prints. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Twentieth-Century Photography Fund, 2015, 2017. Image courtesy The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Unknown American maker. Studio Portrait, 1940s–50s. Gelatin silver prints. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Twentieth-Century Photography Fund, 2015, 2017. Image courtesy The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

 African American Portraits: Photographs from the 1940s and 1950s is organized by Jeff L. Rosenheim, Joyce Frank Menschel Curator in Charge of the Department of Photographs at The Met.