Biennale Gherdëina: Persones Persons at Val Gardena, Italy, through September 25, 2022

“BIENNALE GHERDËINA ∞ PERSONES PERSONS  opened on 20 May 2022 with a series of new installations, performances, sculptures, sound pieces, textile works, walks, and participatory experiences alongside existing and historical works that reverberate the Biennale’s themes, passions and lines of intensity while responding to the unique landscape and setting of the Val Gardena territory. It is the eighth edition of the biennale. This edition includes new locations in Ladinia: Ortisei, Castel Gardena, Vallunga and a range of newly commissioned works. Works range from an immersive walk to installations, performances, installations and performances, all across and in response, to the landscape.” — Biennale Gherdëina

Doris Ghetta, founder and Director of Biennale Gherdëina says: “All around the world, art biennials usually take place in large urban centres, so the Biennale Gherdëina represents the exception to the rule. Its distinctiveness gives the event a strong identity – with factors such as the mountain landscape, rurality, language and cultural history hugely influencing its structure and content – and a uniqueness impossible to find in the same form in other places. We are living in what has been described as ‘the era of living creatures’….this means that, if we are to plan a sustainable society, we can no longer incline towards an anthropocentric worldview but need to centre our way of seeing reality around all living things: from air to plants, water, snow, animals and, of course, human beings. The fact that Biennale Gherdëina ∞ has decided to focus its artistic reflection on this particular subject makes this edition of the event particularly topical.”

Alex Cecchetti, SENTIERO, 2022. Project supported by the Italian Council (10th edition, 2022) by the Directorate General for Contemporary Creativity of the Italian Ministry of Culture. Ph. Tiberio Sorvillo
Gabriel Chaile, Brenda, 2022. View of Piazza Sant’Antonio, Ortisei. Commissioned by Biennale Gherdëina ∞. Ph. Tiberio Sorvillo
Thaddäus Salcher, Spiedl dl’ana, 2022. View of Strada Rezia, Ortisei. Commissioned by Biennale Gherdëina ∞. Ph. Tiberio Sorvillo
Angelo Plessas, The Hand of the Noosphere, 2022. View at Hotel Ladinia, Ortisei. Commissioned by Biennale Gherdëina ∞. Ph. Tiberio Sorvillo
Ana Vaz and Nuno da Luz, Wolves howling – In choir – Evening snow, 2022. Exhibition view at Hotel Ladinia, Ortisei. Commissioned by Biennale Gherdëina ∞. Ph. Tiberio Sorvillo
Biennale Gherdëina ∞. Martina Kyriaki Goni and Giles Round. Exhibition view at Sala Trenker, Ortisei, 2022. Ph. Tiberio Sorvillo
Biennale Gherdëina ∞. Exhibition view at Sala Trenker, Ortisei, 2022. Ph. Tiberio Sorvillo
Biennale Gherdëina ∞. Etel Adnan and Simone Fattal. Exhibition view at Sala Trenker, Ortisei, 2022. Ph. Tiberio Sorvillo
Biennale Gherdëina ∞. Exhibition view at Sala Trenker, Ortisei, 2022. Ph. Tiberio Sorvillo
Biennale Gherdëina ∞. Jimmie Durham. Exhibition view at Sala Trenker, Ortisei, 2022. Ph. Tiberio Sorvillo
Bruno Walpoth, Pinocchio, 2022. View at Castel Gardena, Selva Gardena. Commissioned by Biennale Gherdëina ∞. Ph. Tiberio Sorvillo
Chiara Camoni, Sister, 2022. View at Castel Gardena, Selva Gardena. Commissioned by Biennale Gherdëina ∞. Ph. Tiberio Sorvillo
Ignota, Memory Garden, 2022. View at Castel Gardena, Selva Gardena. Commissioned by Biennale Gherdëina ∞. Ph. Tiberio Sorvillo
Eduardo Navarro, Spathiphyllum Auris, 2022. View at Vallunga, Selva Gardena. Commissioned by Biennale Gherdëina ∞. Ph. Tiberio Sorvillo

Curated by Lucia Pietroiusti and Filipa Ramos, BIENNALE GHERDËINA ∞ PERSONES PERSONS features artists Etel Adnan, Chiara Camoni, Alex Cecchetti, Gabriel Chaile, Revital Cohen and Tuur Van Balen, Jimmie Durham, Simone Fattal, Barbara Gamper, Kyriaki Goni, Judith Hopf, Ignota (Sarah Shin and Ben Vickers), Karrabing Film Collective, Lina Lapelyte, Britta Marakatt-Labba, Eduardo Navarro, Elizabeth A. Povinelli, Angelo Plessas, Tabita Rezaire, Sergio Rojas, Giles Round, Thaddäus Salcher, Martina Steckholzer, Hylozoic/Desires (Himali Singh Soin and David Soin Tappeser), Ana Vaz and Nuno da Luz, and Bruno Walpoth.

Images courtesy Biennale Gherdëina.

Elemental Matters: The Sculpture of Jonathan Prince at Chesterwood, July 1- October 24, 2022

Elemental Matters: The Sculpture of Jonathan Prince, will be on view July 1 – October 24, 2022 at Chesterwood in Stockbridge, Massachusetts. Featuring 12 monumental outdoor sculptures by Prince, sited throughout the landscape, Elemental Matters is Chesterwood’s 44th annual contemporary sculpture show. 

A site of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, Chesterwood is the former summer home and studio of sculptor Daniel Chester French in Stockbridge, MA. French (1850-1931), best known for his statue of Abraham Lincoln in the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C., which is celebrating its 100th anniversary this year.

Chesterwood’s Guest Curator, Cassandra Sohn, Director of Sohn Fine Art, was drawn to the way Prince’s metal works are often mistaken for wood, stone or liquid. “Though monumental in structure, rooted in geometry and made of metal, Prince’s sculpture’s possess an innate vulnerability. They are a meditation both in process and concept.” states Sohn, “The cracks and breaks remind us of the fragility in nature and humanity.”

Torus 340, CorTen / stainless steel, 162 x 144 x 96 in. Property of the artist
Shatter I, II, III, CorTen and mirror polished marine grade stainless steel, 86 x 46 x 46 in.
Alembic Cube, CorTen and mirror polished marine grade stainless steel, 100 x 96 x 96 in.
G2V, CorTen and mirror polished marine grade stainless steel, 114 x 96 x 48 in. Property of the artist.
Rumination, CorTen steel, 144 x 16 x 16 in.
Turbulence Column, High chromium stainless steel, 85 x 19 w x 19 in. Property of the artist.

Images courtesy Jonathan Prince.

PLEASE SEND TO REAL LIFE: Ray Johnson Photographs at The Morgan Library & Museum, June 17 – October 2, 2022  

“The Morgan Library & Museum presents PLEASE SEND TO REAL LIFE: Ray Johnson Photographs, opening June 17 and running through October 2, 2022. This exhibition explores the previously unknown camera work of the widely connected downtown New York figure, Pop art innovator, and pioneer of collage and mail art. At his death on 13 January 1995, Ray Johnson (1927–1995) left behind a vast archive of art in his house, including over five thousand color photographs made in his last three years. Small prints, neatly stored in their envelopes from the developer’s shop, the photographs remained virtually unexamined for three decades. Now they can be seen as the last act in a romance with photography that had begun in Johnson’s art some forty years earlier. After retracing the story of Johnson’s use of photography throughout his career, PLEASE SEND TO REAL LIFE offers an in-depth look at the late work the artist called ‘my career in photography’.” — The Morgan Library & Museum  

Ray Johnson (1927–1995). Bill and Long Island Sound, winter 1992. Commercially processed chromogenic print. The Morgan Library & Museum, Gift of the Ray Johnson Estate, courtesy of Frances Beatty. © Ray Johnson / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.
Ray Johnson (1927–1995). Shadow and manhole, spring 1992. Commercially processed chromogenic print. The Morgan Library & Museum, Gift of the Ray Johnson Estate, courtesy of Frances Beatty. © Ray Johnson / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.
Ray Johnson (1927–1995). Path of headshots and back steps, spring 1992. Commercially processed chromogenic print. The Morgan Library & Museum, Gift of the Ray Johnson Estate, courtesy of Frances Beatty. © Ray Johnson / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.
Ray Johnson (1927–1995). Andy Warhol life dates on flowers, July 1992. Commercially processed chromogenic print. The Morgan Library & Museum, Gift of the Ray Johnson Estate, courtesy of Frances Beatty. © Ray Johnson / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.
Ray Johnson (1927–1995). RJ silhouette and wood, Stehli Beach, autumn 1992. Commercially processed chromogenic print. The Morgan Library & Museum, Gift of the Ray Johnson Estate, courtesy of Frances Beatty. © Ray Johnson / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.
Ray Johnson (1927–1995). Jasper John, February 1993. Commercially processed chromogenic print. The Morgan Library & Museum, Gift of the Ray Johnson Estate, courtesy of Frances Beatty. © Ray Johnson / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.
Ray Johnson (1927–1995). Headshot and Elvises in RJ’s car, February 1993. Commercially processed chromogenic print. The Morgan Library & Museum, Gift of the Ray Johnson Estate, courtesy of Frances Beatty. © Ray Johnson / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.(ARS), New York.
Ray Johnson (1927–1995). Outdoor Movie Show on RJ’s car, February 1993. Commercially processed chromogenic print. The Morgan Library & Museum, Gift of the Ray Johnson Estate, courtesy of Frances Beatty. © Ray Johnson / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.
Ray Johnson (1927–1995). Four Movie Stars, Locust Valley Cemetery, 31 March 1993. Commercially processed chromogenic print. The Morgan Library & Museum, Gift of the Ray Johnson Estate, courtesy of Frances Beatty. © Ray Johnson / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.
Ray Johnson (1927–1995). Harpo Marx bunny, headshot, and payphone, February 1994. Commercially processed chromogenic print. The Morgan Library & Museum, Gift of the Ray Johnson Estate, courtesy of Frances Beatty. © Ray Johnson / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.
Ray Johnson (1927–1995). RJ with Please Send To Real Life and camera in mirror, 23 December 1994. Commercially processed chromogenic print. The Morgan Library & Museum, Gift of the Ray Johnson Estate, courtesy of Frances Beatty. © Ray Johnson / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

“These photographs show that in his last years, Ray Johnson remained irrepressibly, explosively creative,” said Smith, the Richard L. Menschel Curator of Photography at the Morgan. “It’s his last great body of work, and its very casualness is prophetic: ten years later, smart phones and social media turned daily life into a constant exchange of personal photographs and commentary. Johnson was still making collages right up to the end—but now he made them in a camera, and the ‘real life’ all around him was his medium.”

Exhibition was curated by Joel Smith.

Images courtesy  The Morgan Library & Museum.

William Klein: YES at International Center of Photography (ICP), June 3 – September 12, 2022

“This summer, the International Center of Photography (ICP) presents a major retrospective exhibition of the work of the multifaceted artist William Klein. On view at ICP from June 3 through September 12, 2022, William Klein: YES; Photographs, Paintings, Films, 1948–2013 features nearly 300 works, filling ICP’s museum building with photographs, paintings, films, photobooks, and other media from Klein’s expansive and boundary-pushing six-decade career.

The first U.S. exhibition devoted to Klein’s work in more than a generation, William Klein: YES is curated by David Campany, ICP’s Curator-at-Large. Campany has worked with Klein for over a decade to bring together the diverse strands of Klein’s global practice in painting, graphic design, street photography, fashion photography, documentary film, fiction film, and books. A fully illustrated book, written by Campany and published by Thames & Hudson, will be published at a later date.” — ICP

William Klein, Moves and Pepsi, Harlem, New York, 1955. © William Klein, Courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery
William Klein, Watchman, Cinecittà, Rome, 1956. © William Klein, Courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery
William Klein, Backstage “Who Are You, Polly Maggoo?”, 1966. © William Klein, Courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery
William Klein, Karl Lagerfeld and Klein, 2006. © William Klein, Courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery
William Klein, Auto-Portrait, 1993. © William Klein, Courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery

“For a long time, Klein was known as either a fashion photographer or a street photographer or a filmmaker, as different audiences knew and valued different aspects of his work. Only in recent years has the scope of his achievements begun to be recognized,” said curator David Campany. “Versatility runs against the idea that artistic significance is based on single themes and recurring preoccupations. But artists like Klein, who ranged freely and avoided specialism, are key to understanding the culture of the last century.”

Images courtesy International Center of Photography.

At the Dawn of a New Age: Early Twentieth- Century American Modernism at Whitney Museum of American Art, May 7, 2022 – March 2023

At the Dawn of a New Age: Early Twentieth-Century American Modernism brings together works by lesser-known modernists and familiar icons, created between 1900 and 1930. It uncovers how these artists used abstraction and responded to the realities of a rapidly modernizing world. Featuring artworks drawn primarily from the Whitney’s collection, including new acquisitions and rarely seen works, the exhibition represents over 60 works by more than 45 artists working in various styles and media, including paintings, drawings, sculptures, prints, photographs, and woodcuts. At the Dawn of a New Age offers a broader perspective on early twentieth-century American modernism by including groundbreaking, historically overlooked artists like Henrietta Shore, Charles Duncan, Yun Gee, Manierre Dawson, Blanche Lazzell, Ben Benn, Isami Doi, and Albert Bloch in addition to well-known artists like Marsden Hartley, Oscar Bluemner, Elie Nadelman, Charles Burchfield, Aaron Douglas, and Georgia O’Keeffe.” — Whitney Museum of American Art

Installation views of At the Dawn of a New Age: Early Twentieth-Century American Modernism at Whitney Museum of American Art. Photos by Corrado Serra.

“In the Whitney’s early days, the Museum favored realism over abstract styles,” said Curator Barbara Haskell. “It wasn’t until the mid-1970s that the Museum expanded its focus and began acquiring nonrepresentational works from the period. Gaps remain, but the Museum’s holdings of early twentieth-century modernism now rank among the collection’s strengths. By bringing together familiar icons, works that have been in storage for decades, and new acquisitions, At the Dawn of a New Age gives us an opportunity to reassess how we tell the story of this period of American art and celebrate its complexity and spirit of innovation.”

At the Dawn of a New Age: Early Twentieth-Century American Modernism is organized by Whitney Curator Barbara Haskell.

Cecilia Vicuña: Spin Spin Triangulene at Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, May 27 – September 5, 2022

“The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum presents an exhibition devoted to Chilean artist, poet, activist, and filmmaker Cecilia Vicuña (b. 1948, Santiago), who has been based in New York for the last forty years. Showcasing Vicuña’s artistic production from the late 1960s to today, this focused exhibition will feature the breadth of her multidisciplinary practice, including paintings, works on paper, textiles, films, a site-specific Quipu (Knot) installation, and a one-time performance of a “living” Quipu, commissioned by the museum’s Latin American Circle. The exhibition will also include new paintings and works on paper created specifically for this presentation. The title, Spin Spin Triangulene, is a poetic creation based on new scientific discoveries the artist relates to the Guggenheim’s spiral rotunda and the quipu, to stress the connection between science and Indigenous knowledge Vicuña has observed since her early encounter with cybernetics as a young student in Chile. Long anticipated, this is the first solo exhibition of Vicuña’s work in a New York museum and will bring renewed and overdue national and international attention to a pioneering contemporary Latin American artist.” — Guggenheim Museum

Installation views of Cecilia Vicuña: Spin Spin Triangulene, May 27, 2022 – September 5, 2022, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. Photos by David Heald © Solomon R. Guggenheim.

This exhibition is organized by Pablo León de la Barra, Curator at Large, Latin America, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and Foundation, and Geaninne Gutiérrez-Guimarães, Associate Curator, Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and Foundation.

Title Image: Cecilia Vicuña, Autobiografía (Autobiography), 1971. Oil on canvas, 23 1/2 × 25 1/4 in. (59.7 × 64.1 cm). Collection Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, Museum purchase, Elizabeth W. Russell Foundation Fund, 2019. Photo: Matthew Herrmann, courtesy the artist and Lehmann Maupin, New York, Hong Kong, Seoul, and London. © Cecilia Vicuña.

Images courtesy Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum.

Cornelia Parker at Tate Britain, May 18 – October 16, 2022

“Tate Britain presents the first major survey of Cornelia Parker’s works held in London. One of Britain’s leading contemporary artists, Parker is responsible for some of the most unique and unforgettable artworks of the past thirty years. Driven by curiosity, Parker transforms seemingly everyday objects into extraordinary works of art. Through visual allusions and metaphors, Parker’s works explore contemporary issues such as violence, human rights and environmental disaster. The exhibition brings together over 90 artworks spanning immersive installations, sculptures, film, photography and drawing, to celebrate the breadth of Parker’s highly experimental and wide-ranging practice to date.

Cornelia Parker first came to prominence in the late 1980s creating large-scale suspended installations and sculptures which have captivated audiences around the world ever since. This exhibition includes several of her best-known early works including Thirty Pieces of Silver 1988-89, an installation of flattened silver objects including teapots, candle sticks and dinnerware collected from charity shops and car boot sales; and Cold Dark Matter: An Exploded View 1991, a garden shed frozen at the moment of explosion, its fragments surrounding a single lightbulb. Examples of Parker’s more recent room-sized works are included, such as War Room 2015, created from the reams of perforated red paper negatives left over from the production of British Legion remembrance poppies, and Magna Carta (An Embroidery) 2015, a thirteen-metre long collectively hand-sewn embroidery of a Wikipedia page, which involved over 200 volunteers including public figures, human rights lawyers, politicians and prisoners.” — Tate Britain

Cornelia Parker, Cold Dark Matter – An Exploded View c: An Exploded View, 1991 Tate
© Cornelia Parker 
Cornelia Parker, Cold Dark Matter installation view at Tate Britain. Photo Tate Photography Oli Cowling
Cornelia Parker, Island installation view at Tate Britain. Photo Tate Photography Oli Cowling
Cornelia Parker, Perpetual Canon, 2004. Collection of Contemporary Art Fundación “la Caixa”, Barcelona © Cornelia Parker
Cornelia Parker, Thirty Pieces of Silver installation view at Tate Britain. Photo Tate Photography Oli Cowling
Cornelia Parker, War Room, 2015. Image © the Whitworth, The University of Manchester. Photography by Michael Pollard
Cornelia Parker, The Distance (A Kiss with String Attached), 2003. Auguste Rodin’s The Kiss, 1901–4 wrapped in a mile of string © Tate Photography

Cornelia Parker is curated by Andrea Schlieker, Director of Exhibitions & Displays, Tate Britain, with Nathan Ladd, Assistant Curator, Contemporary British Art, Tate Britain.

Images courtesy Tate Britain.

Analog City: New York B.C. (Before Computers) at Museum of the City of New York, May 20 – December 31, 2022  

“A new exhibition at Museum of the City of New York takes visitors on a visit to pre-digital New York, where analog innovations, professions, and industries fueled the city’s growth and status. On view from May 20, 2022-December 31, 2022, Analog City: New York B.C. (Before Computers) presents more than 100 photographs and once-pioneering objects, from rotary phones to pneumatic tubes, offering an opportunity for visitors to reflect on the city’s history of progress and interact with many of the inventions that led the way for contemporary networks and industries.

New York thrived as a center of finance, news, research, and real estate in an era before personal computers and the internet. Historical artifacts, images, audio, video, and hands-on interactives will immerse visitors in the sights and sounds of the pre-digital city. Analog City will take a special look at New York City institutions such as The New York Times, the New York Public Library and the Brooklyn Public Library, and the New York Stock Exchange, among many others, to examine how the analog systems born between the 1870s and the 1970s changed these institutions, and how they served and impacted New Yorkers across the five boroughs.” — Museum of the City of New York

Installation views of Analog City: New York B.C. (Before Computers) at Museum of the City of New York. Photos by Corrado Serra.

 “New York has always been a city on the cutting edge, and this exhibition allows us to marvel at both how advanced these analog tools were in their time, and how far we’ve now progressed in the Internet era,” said Whitney Donhauser, Ronay Menschel Director and President of the Museum of the City of New York. “Whether you remember speaking with a telephone operator, or you’re too young to know the origin of ‘hang up the phone,’ Analog City offers a fascinating dive into New York’s leading industries and the inventions that made them run.”

Analog City is organized by curator Lilly Tuttle and designed by Abbott Miller of Pentagram.

Revitalized Northwest Coast Hall at American Museum of Natural History, May 13, 2022

“The iconic Northwest Coast Hall at the American Museum of Natural History returns to public view on May 13 with new exhibits developed with Indigenous communities from the Pacific Northwest Coast. The Hall presents more than 1,000 cultural treasures that are installed throughout the gallery and in 50 display cases, many of which afford nearly 360-degree views of the treasures within.

Showcasing the creativity, scholarship, and history of the living cultures of the Pacific Northwest, the Northwest Coast Hall reopens in the Museum’s oldest gallery, which in 1899 became home to its first permanent exhibit dedicated to the interpretation of cultures. More than 120 years later, the Hall has been fully revitalized, with curation by Peter Whiteley, curator of North American Ethnology at the Museum, and Co-Curator Ḥaa’yuups, Nuu-chah-nulth scholar and cultural historian, working in collaboration with a group of Consulting Curators from the Coast Salish, Gitxsan, Haida, Haíłzaqv, Kwakwaka’wakw, Nuu-chah-nulth, Nuxalk, Tlingit, and Tsimshian communities.” — American Museum of Natural History

Installation views of Northwell Coast Hall at American Museum of Natural History. Photos by Corrado Serra.

“It started with us listening. The strong voices of the Northwest Coast cultures are vibrantly amplified through the new installation of objects, presented in the round and with contextual relationships to one another,” said Kulapat Yantrasast, founder and creative director of WHY. “As an architect, the opportunity to really spend time absorbing and conversing with the multiple cultures represented in our project has greatly informed how we were able to bring out a fresh design, one that provides clarity and sense of place while respecting and responding to the deep context and diverse stories that the meaningful art objects present.”

Kulapat Yantrasast of WHY Architects developed the concept design for the revitalization of the Hall, working closely with the Museum’s award-winning Exhibition Department, led by Lauri Halderman, vice president for exhibition.

Outsider Art: from the Jessica Weber Collection at The Century Association, May 12- July 29, 2022

Outsider Art: from the collection of Jessica Weber opens at The Century Association on May 12. The exhibition captures the achievement and diversity of self taught artists. The works using different materials and techniques confront personal and social concerns. The exhibit showcases 24 works of Minnie Adkins, Clementine Hunter, David Butler, Sister Gertrude Morgan, B.F. Perkins, Jimmy Lee Sudduth, Mose Tolliver, and Terry Turrell.

“About thirty years ago I was mesmerized by a wooden sculpture of an angel in a gallery window on Madison Avenue. It stopped me in my tracks and I could not take my eyes off of it. I was surprised by the unfamiliar yet striking intimacy I felt. I had never seen such raw power in such a common object. There was an innocence and unabashed self expression in it that touched my heart.” — Jessica Weber

Minnie Adkins (1934– ). Guardian Angel, 1995. 22”(ht) x 13”(w), carved, painted basswood
Clementine Hunter (1886–1988). Girl Pulling Peach Cart with Chicken, late 1960s. 9.5”(ht) x 11.75”(w),oil on canvas board
David Butler (1898–1997). Untitled – Spirit Window. 27”(ht) x 27.75”(w), cut tin and house paint
Sister Gertrude Morgan (1900–1980). Holy Bible, Book Devine. 12.5”(ht) x 9”(w), pencil, watercolor, gouache and ink on paper
B.F. Perkins (1904–1993). A Great Nation, 2/2/92. 23.25”(ht) x 35.25”9W), oil/acrylic on canvas
Jimmy Lee Sudduth (1910–2007). Untitled, c.1985. 23.25” x 24”, mud, sugar water, acrylic, craft paint on board
Mose Tolliver (1915–2006). (Left) Erotic Painted Gourd, c. 1990, 10” (ht) x 9” (w). (Right) Painted Birdhouse, c.1990. 8” (ht)
Terry Turrell (1946– ) . Cacti, 2007.14.5”(ht) x 15.5”(w), mixed media on paper and board

Images courtesy Jessica Weber.

In America: An Anthology of Fashion at The Met’s American Wing, May 7 – September 5, 2022 

“The Costume Institute’s 2022 spring exhibition, In America: An Anthology of Fashion—the second of a two-part presentation—explores the foundations of American fashion through a series of sartorial displays featuring individual designers and dressmakers who worked in the United States from the 19th to the mid-late 20th century. 

The exhibition features approximately 100 examples of men’s and women’s dress dating from the 19th to the mid-late 20th century that reveal unfinished stories about American fashion. The garments are presented within the rich atmospheric setting of The Met’s American Wing period rooms, or historical interiors, which encapsulate a curated survey of more than a century of American domestic life and reveal a variety of stories—from the personal to the political, the stylistic to the cultural, and the aesthetic to the ideological. The complicated social, cultural, and artistic narratives of these spaces amplify and contextualize the exhibition’s key themes—the inception of an identifiable American style, and the emergence of the named designer, who is recognized for distinct artistic vision.” — The Met

Case Study, Gallery 723. Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art.
The Baltimore Dining Room. Director: Autumn de Wilde. Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art.
The Benkard Room. Director: Autumn de Wilde. Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art.
Richmond Room. Director: Regina King. Image courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, BFA.com/Matteo Prandoni
Haverhill Room. Director: Radha Blank. Image courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, BFA.com/Matteo Prandoni
Shaker Retiring Room. Director: Chloé Zhao. Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art.
Vanderlyn Panorama. Director: Tom Ford. Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art.
Renaissance Revival Room. Director: Julie Dash. Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art.
Greek Revival Parlor. Director: Julie Dash. Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art.
Rococo Revival Parlor. Director: Janicza Bravo. Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art.
Gothic Revival Library. Director: Janicza Bravo. Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art.
McKim, Mead & White Stair Hall. Director: Sofia Coppola. Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art.
Worsham-Rockefeller Dressing Room. Director: Sofia Coppola. Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art.
Frank Lloyd Wright Room. Director: Martin Scorsese. Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Part Two is organized by Andrew Bolton; Jessica Regan, Associate Curator of The Costume Institute; and Amelia Peck, the Marica F. Vilcek Curator of American Decorative Arts and Supervising Curator of the Ratti Textile Center, with the support of Sylvia Yount. 

LAMB Design Studio’s Shane Valentino oversaw the design of both parts with The Met’s Design Department. Cinematographer Bradford Young worked with Valentino on the lighting. Franklin Leonard acted as advisor on the exhibition.

Images courtesy The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Kazuko Miyamoto: To perform a line at Japan Society, April 29 – July 24, 2022

Kazuko Miyamoto: To perform a line is the first institutional exhibition to survey the significant artist Kazuko Miyamoto (b. 1942). The exhibition brings together key bodies of the artist’s work, beginning with her contributions to (and subversion of) the Minimalism movement through early paintings and drawings from the late 1960s and moving to her increasingly spatial string constructions of the 1970s, culminating with her kimono series from 1987 through the 2000s. A number of the works that are on view have never been shown together nor been exhibited since they were first created, offering a crucial opportunity for the public to encounter Miyamoto’s rich oeuvre for the first time and providing an overdue re-examination of this singular artist.” — Japan Society

Installation views of Kazuko Miyamoto: To perform a line at Japan Society. Photos by Corrado Serra.

Kazuko Miyamoto: To perform a line was curated by Tiffany Lambert. The exhibition design was by New York-based Ransmeier, Inc.