Items: Is Fashion Modern? at The Museum of Modern Art, through January 28, 2018

“The Museum of Modern Art presents Items: Is Fashion Modern?, an investigation of 111 garments and accessories that have had a profound effect on the world over the last century. Filling the entire sixth floor of the Museum, the exhibition explores fashion thematically, displaying 111 powerful and enduring manifestations of the ways in which fashion—a crucial field of design—touches everyone, everywhere. Like other forms of design, fashion exists within a complex system that involves politics and economics as much as it involves style, technology, and culture. The exhibition examines this complex system using each item as a lens. The 111 typologies are presented in the incarnation that made them significant in the last 100 years (the “stereotype”) alongside contextual materials—images or videos—that trace each item’s history and origins through to its archetypal form. Several concept items (the Little Black Dress, for instance) are represented by more than one example in order to fully underscore the breadth of the concept’s impact, bringing the actual total number of objects in the exhibition to around 350. About 30 items will be complemented by a new prototype—a commissioned or loaned piece inspired by advancements in technology, social dynamics, aesthetics, or political awareness.” — MoMA

White T-shirt. Image courtesy Shutterstock/SFIO CRACHO

Levi Strauss & Co. waist overalls, 1890. Courtesy Levi Strauss & Co. Archives (San Francisco).

One-Star Perfecto Leather Motorcycle Jacket, late 1950’s. Courtesy of Schott NYC

Dress by Thierry Mugler, 1981. Courtesy Indianapolis Museum of Art/Lucille Stewart Endowed Art Fund. © Thierry Mugler, 2017

Model wearing a Mohiniattam sari drape with peplum pleats, a style from Kerala, by Taanbaan, part of The Sari Series: An Anthology of Drape, India, 2017. Photograph by Bon Duke. © Border&Fall

Nervous System (est. 2007), Jessica Rosenkrantz (American, b. 1983), Jesse Louis-Rosenberg (American, b. 1986). Kinematics Dress. 2014. Laser-sintered nylon. Image courtesy of Steve Marsel. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Committee on Architecture and Design Funds

A-POC Le Feu, by Issey Miyake and Dai Fujiwara, from the Issey Miyake spring/summer 1999 collection. Photograph by Yasuaki Yoshinaga. Courtesy A-POC LE FEU, 1999 Spring Summer ISSEY MIYAKE Paris Collection. Photo: Yasuaki Yoshinaga

Designer Norma Kamali in a Sleeping Bag Coat, Elle, September 1990. Photograph by Gilles Bensimon. Courtesy Gilles Bensimon

Sikh men wearing dastar, USA, 2013. Courtesy B Christopher / Alamy Stock Photo

Chiefs of the Agotime Traditional Area during the Agotime Kente Festival wearing silk, cotton or rayon Kente cloth, Kpetoe, Volta Region, Ghana. Photographed by Philippe J. Kradolfer.. Courtesy Philippe J. Kradolfer (Nene Dunenyo I)

Mosaic in Piazza Armerina, Villa Romana del Casale, Sicily, 300–400 AD

Head wrap interpreted for Items: Is Fashion Modern? by Omar Victor Diop. © 2017 Omar Victor Diop @africalive-production.com. Image courtesy The Museum of Modern Art, New York.

Hoodie interpreted for Items: Is Fashion Modern? by Omar Victor Diop. © 2017 Omar Victor Diop @africalive-production.com. Image courtesy The Museum of Modern Art, New York.

Pencil skirt interpreted for Items: Is Fashion Modern? by Bobby Doherty. © 2017 Bobby Doherty. Image courtesy The Museum of Modern Art, New York.

Salwar kameez and sari interpreted for Items: Is Fashion Modern? by Bobby Doherty. © 2017 Bobby Doherty. Image courtesy The Museum of Modern Art, New York.

Dashiki, door-knocker earrings, and Dutch wax interpreted for Items: Is Fashion Modern? by Monika Mogi. © 2017 Monika Mogi. Image courtesy The Museum of Modern Art, New York.

Chinos, coppola, and Dr. Martens interpreted for Items: Is Fashion Modern? by Monika Mogi. © 2017 Monika Mogi. Image courtesy The Museum of Modern Art, New York.

Suit and tie interpreted for Items: Is Fashion Modern? by Kristin-Lee Moolman and IB Kamara. © 2017 Kristin-Lee Moolman & IB Kamara. Image courtesy The Museum of Modern Art, New York.

White t-shirt and Y-3 interpreted for Items: Is Fashion Modern? by Kristin-Lee Moolman and IB Kamara. © 2017 Kristin-Lee Moolman & IB Kamara. Image courtesy The Museum of Modern Art, New York.

“A powerful form of creative and personal expression that can be approached from multiple angles of study, fashion is unquestionably also a form of design, with its pitch struck in negotiations between form and function, means and goals, automated technologies and craftsmanship, standardization and customization, universality and self-expression,” said Antonelli. “Like all physical and digital forms of design, it moves today on a spectrum ranging from post-industrial seriality (from prêt-à-porter to fast fashion) to precious, handcrafted uniqueness (couture). As design, it exists in the service of others. In most cases, it is designed by a human being to dress others—sometimes many, many others—so that they can function in the world, in different arenas.”

Items is organized by Paola Antonelli, Senior Curator, Department of Architecture and Design, and Director of Research and Development; and Michelle Millar Fisher, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Architecture and Design, The Museum of Modern Art.

Installation Photo: Martin Seck. Images courtesy The Museum of Modern Art.

Dali and Schiaparelli at The Dali Museum, October 18, 2017 – January 14, 2018

“Delight in the daring and irreverent works of two celebrated artists when Dali and Schiaparelli opens at The Dali, in St. Petersburg, FL on October 18, 2017. The exhibit – presented in collaboration by The Dali Museum and Schiaparelli Paris – will feature haute couture gowns and accessories, jewelry, paintings, drawings, objects and photos, as well as new designs by Bertrand Guyon for Maison Schiaparelli. This will be the first exhibition dedicated to the creative relationship and works of Elsa Schiaparelli and Salvador Dali – friends and collaborators that set Paris and the world ablaze with their groundbreaking visions.

Elsa Schiaparelli was regarded as the most prominent figure in fashion between the two World Wars. Her designs deliberately subverted traditional notions of women’s roles and beauty, embracing and exaggerating the transgressive nature of fashion. Schiaparelli explored bold Surrealistic themes in her designs, heavily influenced by artists, especially Dali, with whom she often collaborated. The vibrant colors, experimental fabrics and elegant handmade decorations set her apart from other designers of the 1920s and 1930s. Some of the most notable clients for Schiaparelli’s haute couture designs included the Duchess of Windsor, Wallis Simpson; heiress Daisy Fellowes; and actresses Mae West and Marlene Dietrich. — The Dali Museum

Woman’s Dinner Dress. Philadelphia Museum of Art, Gift of Mme Elsa Schiaparelli, 1969-232-52.

Aphrodisiac Telephone (Lobster Telephone). Salvador Dalí, 1938. Worldwide rights ©Salvador Dalí. Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí (Artists Rights Society), 2017 / In the USA ©Salvador Dalí Museum, Inc. St. Petersburg, FL 2017.

Schiaparelli telephone dial powder compact, c. 1935. Courtesy of © Schiaparelli archives.

Elsa Schiaparelli and Salvador Dalí, circa 1949. Image Rights of Salvador Dalí reserved. Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, Figueres, 2017.

Anthropomorphic Cabinet. Salvador Dalí, 1936. © Salvador Dalí, Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York 2017.

Illustration of the Bureau-Drawer Suit, Schiaparelli Haute Couture, Fall/Winter 1936-1937. © Schiaparelli.

Woman’s Evening Dress and Veil, (Tear Dress), Summer 1938. Philadelphia Museum of Art, Gift of Mme Elsa Schiaparelli, 1969-232-45a,b.

Three Young Surrealist Women Holding in their Arms the Skins of an Orchestra, 1936. Oil on canvas. Worldwide rights ©Salvador Dalí. Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí (Artists Rights Society), 2017 / In the USA ©Salvador Dalí Museum, Inc. St. Petersburg, FL 2017.

Woman’s Evening Dress and Veil, (Tear Dress), Summer 1938. Philadelphia Museum of Art, Gift of Mme Elsa Schiaparelli, 1969-232-45a,b.

Tristan and Isolde, 1953. 4.2 cm x 4.5 cm x 1 cm ©Salvador Dalí. Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, (Artist Rights Society), 2017 / Collection of the Salvador Dalí Museum, Inc., St. Petersburg, FL, 2017.

Evening Dress (Skeleton Dress), 1938. Collection of the Salvador Dalí. Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York 2017; Courtesy of © Schiaparelli archives.

Study of figures for Skeleton Dress, 1938. Ink on paper. Collection of the Schiaparelli archives, Paris; © Salvador Dalí. Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí (Artists Rights Society), 2017.

“Le Roy Soleil” magazine advertisement. ©Salvador Dalí. Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York 2017/ Collection of the Salvador Dalí Museum, Inc., St. Petersburg, FL, 2017.

“Le Roy Soleil” perfume bottle by Schiaparelli, 1946. ©Salvador Dalí. Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York 2017; Courtesy of © Schiaparelli archives

Schiaparelli Haute Couture, Spring/Summer 2017

Schiaparelli Haute Couture, Fall/Winter 2016-17

The exhibition is organized by The Dali, St. Petersburg FL in collaboration with Schiaparelli, Paris with loans from the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Metropolitan Museum and others.

Images courtesy The Dali Museum.

Ilya and Emilia Kabakov: Not Everyone Will be Taken Into the Future at Tate Modern, October 18, 2017 – January 28, 2018

“This October, coinciding with the 100th anniversary of the 1917 Russian Revolution, Tate Modern will stage the first major museum exhibition in the UK of artists Ilya and Emilia Kabakov (b.1933 and b.1945). Curated in close dialogue with the artists and organised in collaboration with the State Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg and the State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow, the exhibition will explore this pioneering couple’s place in the international story of conceptual art and will offer the chance to view rarely seen works together for the first time in the UK.

The Kabakovs are amongst the most celebrated Russian artists of their generation, widely known for their large-scale installations which draw upon the visual culture of the former Soviet Union and narrative traditions of Russian literature, often addressing universal themes such as utopia, dreams, fears and the human condition. The exhibition will feature over 100 works in a range of media, including paintings, drawings, albums, models and installations, and will chart their artistic journey, from Ilya’s role as an unofficial artist in Moscow working under the radar of the Soviet authorities, through to his move to the west in 1987, and subsequent collaboration with Emilia.

The title of the exhibition, Not Everyone Will Be Taken Into the Future, is taken from Ilya’s response to a study on the Russian abstract artist Kazimir Malevich, published in a 1983 issue of the underground magazine A-YA. In his writing, Kabakov poetically imagines Malevich as a headmaster selecting students for summer camp – an allegory for those artists who will – and will not – be taken into the future.” — Tate Modern

Ilya Kabakov (b. 1933) and Emilia Kabakov (b. 1945). The Appearance of the Collage #10,  2012. Oil paint on canvas, 2030 x 2720 mm. Private collection © Ilya & Emilia Kabakov. Photograph by Kerry Ryan McFate, courtesy Pace Gallery

Ilya Kabakov (b. 1933) and Emilia Kabakov (b. 1945). The Six Paintings about the Temporary Loss of Eyesight (They are Painting the Boat), 2015. Oil paint on canvas, 1120 x 1960 mm.  Private collection © Ilya & Emilia Kabakov. 
Photograph courtesy the artists and Pace Gallery

Ilya Kabakov (b. 1933) and Emilia Kabakov (b. 1945). Inscriptions on the Wall (Reichstag), model. Date unknown. Paint on wood, 915 x 1067 x 559 mm. Private collection © Ilya & Emilia Kabakov

Ilya Kabakov (b. 1933). The Man Who Flew Into Space From His Apartment, 1985. Six poster panels with collage. Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris. Musée national d’art moderne/Centre de Création industrielle. Purchased 1990. © Ilya & Emilia Kabakov

Ilya Kabakov (b. 1933). Self-Portrait, 1959. Oil paint on canvas, 605 x 605 mm. Private collection © Ilya & Emilia Kabakov

Ilya Kabakov (b. 1933) and Emilia Kabakov (b. 1945). Not Everyone Will Be Taken into The Future, 2001. Wooden construction, railway car fragment, running-text display and paintings MAK – Austrian Museum of Applied Arts / Contemporary Art, Vienna © Ilya & Emilia Kabakov

Ilya Kabakov (b. 1933). Labyrinth (My Mother’s Album), 1990. Wooden construction, 9 doors, wooden ceiling props, 24 light bulbs, detritus, audio and 76 works on paper, photographs, ink and printed papers. Tate. Purchased 2002. © Ilya & Emilia Kabakov

Ilya and Emilia Kabakov: Not Everyone Will be Taken Into the Future is curated by Juliet Bingham, Curator, Tate Modern with Katy Wan, Assistant Curator, Tate Modern.

Images courtesy Tate Modern.

Ruth Gruber: Photojournalist at Jewish Museum of Florida, October 16, 2017 – January 7, 2018

“The Jewish Museum of Florida-FIU presents the southeastern U.S. premiere of Ruth Gruber: Photojournalist. Headlining Art Basel season in Miami Beach, the new exhibition celebrates the remarkable life, vision, and heroic tenacity of this twentieth-century pioneer and trailblazer. Once the world’s youngest PhD, Ruth Gruber passed away recently at the age of 105. The show features more than 60 photographs including gelatin silver prints plus an archival trove of personal letters, telegrams, printed magazines, and assorted ephemera documenting the artist’s career. The photographs in this exhibition span more than fifty years, from Gruber’s groundbreaking reportage of the Soviet Arctic in the 1930s and iconic images of Jewish refugees from the ship Exodus 1947, to her later photographs of Ethiopian Jews in the midst of civil war in the 1980s. A selection of Gruber’s vintage prints, never before exhibited, will be presented alongside contemporary prints made from her original negatives.

Gruber was the author of twenty books and is the recipient of ICP’s 2011 Infinity Awards Cornell Capa Award. Her reportage and photojournalism acted as both advocate and witness for her subjects throughout her extensive career. Ruth Gruber: Photojournalist will celebrate one of the twentieth century’s great humanitarians and photojournalists. “These messages of hope and of living with a heroic purpose to make a difference ring true in today’s world, and align powerfully with the mission of the Jewish Museum of Florida-FIU,” said the Museum Director, Susan Gladstone. “We are thrilled to bring this epic story of Ruth Gruber’s life and photos to Miami Beach during Art Basel season.” — FIU

Ruth Gruber. Eklutna woman reading Life Magazine, Hooper Bay, Alaska, 1941-43 © Ruth Gruber

Ruth Gruber. A proud father putting his baby to sleep in a bassinet he constructed from gathered rags and pieces of wood, Cyprus Internment Camp, 1947 © Ruth Gruber

Ruth Gruber. Romanian families reunite in Haifa Port. Many had not seen each other since the beginning of World War II, Israel, 1951 © Ruth Gruber

Ruth Gruber. Children in a Jewish school and soup kitchen, Casablanca, Morocco, 1952 © Ruth Gruber

Ruth Gruber. Ethiopian Jewish mother with a photograph of her children, who have already immigrated to Israel, Ethiopia, 1985 © Ruth Gruber

Ruth Gruber. Students waiting on a U.S. Indian Service school bus, Ward Cove, Alaska Territory, 1941–43 © Ruth Gruber

Wounded refugee from Exodus 1947 is aided by a British soldier and a friend. British soldiers were ordered to un-bandage all wounds to confirm that the refugees were not faking injuries, Haifa Port, Palestine, July 18, 1947 © Ruth Gruber

Unidentified Photographer. Ruth Gruber, Alaska, 1941-43

This exhibition is on loan from the International Center for Photography (ICP) in New York, is drawn from Gruber’s private archive, and was organized by ICP Curator Maya Benton. The Miami persentation is organized by Jackie Goldstein, Curator of the Jewish Museum of Florida-FIU.

Images courtesy Jewish Museum of Florida.

Arts of Korea at Brooklyn Museum, opened September 15, 2017

“The Brooklyn Museum is pleased to unveil Arts of Korea, a celebration of the Museum’s historic Korean collection and a preview of the future Arts of Asia and the Middle East galleries. The renovated Arts of Korea gallery is triple its original size and will display more than three times the amount of artworks and objects, many of which will be on view for the first time or after multiple decades in storage.

A pioneer in the collection and display of Korean art, the Brooklyn Museum has amassed one of the country’s premier Korean collections and was one of the first museums in the United States to establish a permanent Korean art gallery. Arts of Korea presents 80 works of art, including a stunning selection of ceramics—from early stoneware funerary vessels and inlaid celadons to later wares with freely painted underglaze decoration—and rare examples of metalwork, furniture, painting, jewelry, and costume.” — Brooklyn Museum

“The Brooklyn Museum was one of the first to acknowledge the importance of Korean art,” said Joan Cummins, the Museum’s Lisa and Bernard Selz Senior Curator of Asian Art . “Stewart Culin, our first Curator of Ethnology, traveled to Seoul in 1913, and this early commitment to Korean art attracted great gifts over the years. With this larger gallery, we’re excited to showcase the depth and breadth of the collection.”

Bride’s Robe (Hwalot). Korea, Joseon dynasty, 19th century. Cotton, silk, paper, gold thread, 71 x 6 x 48 in. (180.3 x 15.2 x 121.9 cm). Brooklyn Museum Collection, 27.977.4. (Photo: Jonathan Dorado, Brooklyn Museum)

Belt Hook in the Shape of a Horse. Lelang Korea, Proto-Three Kingdoms or Three Kingdoms period, circa 3rd century. Bronze, 2 ⅜ x 3 ⅝ x ¾ in. (6.0 x 9.2 x 1.9 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Paul E. Manheim, 69.125.11. (Photo: Jonathan Dorado, Brooklyn Museum)

Pedestal Bowl with Lid. Korea,Silla kingdom, Korea, Three Kingdoms period,5th century. Stoneware, 7 ⅞ x 5 ½ x 5 ½ in. (20 x 14 x 14 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Sir George Sanson, 40.519a-b. (Photo: Brooklyn Museum)

Pair of Earrings. Korea,Unified Silla period, 6th century.. Gold, 3 11/16 x 1 3/8 in. (9.4 x 3.5 cm), each. Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Theodora Wilbour and Jane Van Vleck, by exchange and Designated Purchase Fund, 2013.3a-b. (Photo: Sarah DeSantis, Brooklyn Museum)

Ewer in the Shape of a Lotus Bud. Korea, Goryeo dynasty, first half 12th century. Carved stoneware with slip decoration under celadon glaze, 9 ⅞ x 9 ½ x 5 ½ in. (25.1 x 24.1 x 14 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Mrs. Darwin R. James III, 56.138.1a-b. (Photo: Brooklyn Museum)

Gourd-Shaped Ewer. Korea, Goryeo dynasty, 12th century. Carved stoneware with celadon glaze, 11 ¾ x 8 ⅞ x 7 in. (30 x 22.5 x 17.8 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Museum Collection Fund, 57.141. (Photo: Brooklyn Museum)

Ewer with Hinged Lid. Korea, Goryeo dynasty, 12th-13th century. Bronze, 10 ¼ x 9 ¼ x 8 3/8 in. (26 x 23.5 x 22.5 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Designated Purchase Fund, 74.163.3. (Photo: Brooklyn Museum)

Cup with Scalloped Rim. Korea, Goryeo dynasty, first half of the 13th century. Stoneware with inlaid slip decoration under celadon glaze, 2 ⅞ x 3 ⅜ x 3 3/8 in. (7.2 x 8.7 x 8.7 cm). Brooklyn Museum, The Peggy N. and Roger G. Gerry Collection, 2004.28.45. Brooklyn Museum photograph (in collaboration with National Research Institute of Cultural Heritage, Daejon, Korea)

Finial in the Shape of a Dragon Head. Korea, Goryeo dynasty, 14th century. Gold, 1 ⅝ x ½ x ¼ in. (4.2 x 1.2 x 0.8 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Purchase gift of Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Martin, 84.36. (Photo: Jonathan Dorado, Brooklyn Museum)

Bottle with Peony Decoration. Korea, Joseon dynasty, mid- to late 15th century. Stoneware with slip decoration under celadon glaze, 8 ⅝ x 7 x 6 in. (22 x 17.8 x 15.2 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Ella C. Woodward Memorial Fund, 75.61. (Photo: Brooklyn Museum)

Spirit Shrine. Korea. Joseon dynasty, 1811. Ink and color on paper, 67 ⅜ x 56 5/8 in. (171 x 143.8 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Designated Purchase Fund, 86.25. (Photo: Brooklyn Museum)

Jar with Dragon Decoration. Korea, Joseon dynasty, mid-17th century. Porcelain with painted decoration under clear glaze, 12 ⅝ x 14 ⅝ x 14 ⅝ in. (32.2 x 37 x 37 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Gift of the Asian Art Council, 86.139. (Photo: Brooklyn Museum)

Pair of Boy Attendants. Korea, Joseon dynasty, 18th century with later coats of paint. Polychromed wood, 83.174.1: 19 ⅞ x 9 ½ x 8 ½ in. (50.5 x 24.1 x 21.6 cm); 83.174.2: 19 ¾ x 9 ½ x 8 ½ in. (50 x 24.1 x 21.6 cm). Brooklyn Museum; Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Stanley L. Wallace, 83.174.1-.2. (Photo: Jonathan Dorado, Brooklyn Museum)

Water Dropper in the Shape of a Peach. Korea; Joseon dynasty, second half of the 18th century. Porcelain with cobalt and copper decoration under clear glaze, 4 ⅜ x 3 ¾ x 3 ⅞ in. (11.1 x 9.5 x 9.8 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Robert S. Anderson, 1993.185.3. (Photo: Jonathan Dorado, Brooklyn Museum)

Palanquin for Funerary Processions. Korea; Joseon dynasty, 19th century. Wood, metal, paper, cloth, 34 ½ x 20 ½ x 25 ¼ in. (87.6 x 52.1 x 64.1 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Designated Purchase Fund, 85.224. (Photo: Sarah DeSantis, Brooklyn Museum)

Lidded Jar with Vine Decoration. Korea; Joseon dynasty, second half of the 19th century. Porcelain with cobalt decoration under clear glaze, 7 ⅞ x 9 x 9 in. (20 x 22.9 x 22.9 cm). Brooklyn Museum; Gift of Bernice and Robert Dickes, 78.247.1a-b. (Photo: Jonathan Dorado, Brooklyn Museum)

Box. Korea; Joseon dynasty, late 19th-early 20th century. Wood, brass fittings, back-painted oxhorn panels, 4 ⅞ x 16 ½ x 4 ⅜ in. (12.5 x 42 x 11.2 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Dr. and Mrs. John P. Lyden, 1995.184.1. (Photo: Jonathan Dorado, Brooklyn Museum)

Mandarin Duck Cabinet. Korea; Joseon dynasty, early 20th century. Lacquered wood, brass fittings, 63 ⅛ x 44 ¾ x 22 ¼ in. (160.3 x 113.7 x 56.5 cm). Brooklyn Museum, George C. Brackett Fund, 34.530. (Photo: Brooklyn Museum)

Arts of Korea is organized by Joan Cummins, Lisa and Bernard Selz Senior Curator of Asian Art, and Susan L. Beningson, Assistant Curator of Asian Art.

Images courtesy Brooklyn Museum.

The Vietnam War: 1945 – 1975 at New-York Historical Society, October 04, 2017 – April 22, 2018

Photographs by Corrado Serra.

“One of the major turning points of the 20th century, the Vietnam War is the subject of an unprecedented exhibition presented by the New-York Historical Society. Bringing the hotly contested history of this struggle into the realm of public display as never before, the exhibition will offer a chronological and thematic narrative of the conflict from 1945 through 1975 as told through more than 300 artifacts, photographs, artworks, documents, and interactive digital media. Objects on display range from a Jeep used at Tan Son Nhut Air Base to a copy of the Pentagon Papers; from posters and bumper stickers both opposing and supporting the U.S. war effort to personal items left at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, DC; from indelible news photographs (such as Eddie Adams’ Execution) to specially commissioned murals by contemporary artist Matt Huynh. While no gallery exhibition can provide a comprehensive, global perspective on this vast subject, the materials brought together in The Vietnam War: 1945–1975 comprises a sweeping and immersive narrative, exploring, from a primarily American viewpoint, how this pivotal struggle was experienced both on the war front and on the home front.” ―  New-York Historical Society

The Vietnam War: 1945–1975 signals a new ambition for the New-York Historical Society, which is to include in our exhibition program histories that are not only difficult but also as yet unresolved,” said Dr. Louise Mirrer, president and CEO of New-York Historical. “This monumental exhibit challenges received wisdom about the origins and consequences of the War, relying on sources only recently made available to scholars as well as first person accounts of those who fought. As the exhibition shows, the War continues to provoke debate and discussion today and to dominate much of our thinking about military conduct and policy. The Vietnam War was the longest armed conflict of the 20th century, and today—more than 40 years after it ended―it continues to influence both public policy and personal convictions. We are grateful for the opportunity to offer the public a chance to better understand events and protagonists of the 20th century that reverberate well into the 21st.”

The Vietnam War: 1945–1975 was curated by Marci Reaven, New-York Historical Society vice president for history exhibitions.

Art and China after 1989: Theater of the World at Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, October 6, 2017 – January 7, 2018

“The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum presents Art and China after 1989: Theater of the World, a major exhibition of contemporary art from China spanning 1989 to 2008, arguably the most transformative period of modern Chinese and recent world history. A fresh interpretative survey of Chinese experimental art framed by the geopolitical dynamics resulting from the end of the Cold War, the spread of globalization, and the rise of China, Art and China after 1989. The exhibition, the largest of its kind ever in North America, looks at a bold contemporary art movement that anticipated, chronicled, and agitated for the sweeping social transformation that has brought China to the center of the global conversation. With a concentration on the conceptualist art practices of two generations of artists, this exhibition examines how Chinese artists have been both critical observers and agents of China’s emergence as a global presence and places their experiments firmly in a global art-historical context.” — Guggenheim Museum   

“Art and China after 1989: Theater of the World revolves around key artists, groups, and movements active across China and internationally, whose provocations aim to forge reality free from ideology, to establish the individual apart from the collective, and to define contemporary Chinese experience in universal terms,” remarks lead curator Alexandra Munroe. “This focused examination invites us to consider our own recent history through the lens of some of the most thoughtful contemporary artists from China.”

Zhang Peili. 30 x 30, 1988. Color video, with sound, 32 min., 9 sec. Guggenheim Abu Dhabi

Wenda Gu. 36 Vanishing Gold Section Pigments, 1991. Mineral pigment in 36 parts, overall trench dimensions: 3 m deep ×150 m × 7 m. Installation view: Exceptional Passage: Chinese Avant-Garde Artists Exhibition, former Kashii Rail Yard, Fukuoka, Japan, August 29–September 30, 1991. Photo: courtesy the artist

Zhang Hongtu. In Memory of Tseng Kwong Chi, 1991. (detail) Photocopy and epoxy resin, 15 pieces, between 30.5 × 28 cm and 34.9 × 28 cm each. Collection of the artist. Photo: courtesy the artist

Zhao Bandi. Young Bandi, 1992. Oil on canvas, 214 x 140 cm. Private collection. Image courtesy ShanghART Gallery, Shanghai

Yu Hong. Deng Xiaoping’s Tour in the South of China, “China Pictorial,: p. 2, no.6, 1992 and 1992, Twenty-Six Years Old, A still of the Film “The days,” 2001, from Witness to Growth, 1999-present. Two parts, left: inkjet print, 68 x 100 cm; right: acrylic on canvas, 100 x 100 cm. Collection of the artist, Beijing © Yu Hong

Huang Yong Ping. Theater of the World, 1993. Wood and steel structure with wire mesh, warming lamps, electric cable, insects (African millipedes, house crickets, goliath beetles, hissing cockroaches, lubber grasshoppers, and stag beetles), leopard geckos, and Italian wall lizards, 150 x 270 x 160 cm. Guggenheim Abu Dhabi © Huang Yong Ping

Chen Shaoxiong. 5 Hours, 1993/2006. DSL Collection Performance view: The Third Artistic Event of the Big Tail Elephant Working Group, outside Red Ant Bar, Guangzhou, November 24, 1993 © Chen Shaoxiong. Photo: courtesy the artist

Liu Dan. Splendor of Heaven and Earth, 1994—1995. Ink on paper, 190 x 500 cm. Collection of Akiko Yamazaki and Jerry Yang. Image courtesy of Akiki Yamazaki and Jerry Yang

Zhou Tiehai. There Came a Mr. Solomon to China, 1994. Ink, graphite, watercolor, and paper collage, 230 × 350 cm. Collection of Laurence A. Rickels. Photo: courtesy the artist

Song Dong. Stamping the Water, 1996. 36 chromogenic prints, 61 × 40 cm each. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Promised Gift of Cynthia Hazen Polsky. Performance view: Keepers of the Waters: Public Art concerning Water, Lhasa, Tibet, August 18–19, 1996. Photo: courtesy the artist and Pace Gallery

Chen Zhen. Fu Dao/Fu Dao, Upside-Down Buddha/Arrival at Good Fortune, 1997. Steel, bamboo, resin Buddha statues, washing machine, computer monitor, tires, bicycle, fan, chair, household appliances, other found objects, and string, approximately 350 x 800 x 550 cm overall. Courtesy Galleria Continua, San Gimignano/Beijing/Les Moulins/ Havana

Jiang Zhi. Object in Drawer, 1997. Three chromogenic prints, 150 x 100 cm each. Collection of the artist. Photo: courtesy the artist

Wang Xingwei. New Beijing, 2001. Oil on canvas, 200 × 300 cm. M+ Sigg Collection, Hong Kong, By donation. Photo: courtesy M+, Hong Kong

Cao Fei. RMB City: A Second Life City Planning by China Tracy (aka: Cao Fei), 2007. Color video, with sound, 6 min. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Purchased with funds contributed by the Young Collectors Council, with additional funds contributed by Shanghai Tang, 2008.30 © Cao Fei

Qiu Zhijie. Map of “Art and China after 1989: Theater of the World,” 2017. Ink on paper, mounted to silk, six panels, 240 x 720 cm overall. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. Gift of the artist with additional funds contributed by the International Director’s Council T31.2017. Photo courtesy the artist

Title Image: Chen Zhen. (detail) Precipitous Parturition, 1999. Photo by Corrado Serra for Arts Summary.

Art and China after 1989: Theater of the World is organized by Alexandra Munroe, Samsung Senior Curator, Asian Art, and Senior Advisor, Global Arts, at the Guggenheim. Guest cocurators are Philip Tinari, Director of the Ullens Center for Contemporary Art, Beijing, and Hou Hanru, Artistic Director of MAXXI National Museum of 21st Century Arts, Rome.

Trigger: Gender as a Tool and a Weapon at New Museum, September 27, 2017 – January 21, 2018

Photographs by Corrado Serra.

“At a moment of political upheaval and renewed culture wars, “Trigger: Gender as a Tool and a Weapon” investigates gender’s place in contemporary art and culture. The exhibition features an intergenerational group of artists who explore gender beyond the binary to usher in more fluid and inclusive expressions of identity.

The New Museum has been committed to urgent ideas since its inception, devoting many exhibitions and programs over the years to issues of representation with regard to gender and sexuality: “Extended Sensibilities” (1982), “Difference” (1984–85), “HOMO VIDEO” (1986–87), and “Bad Girls” (1994) are just four notable examples. Following in this tradition, and in the Museum’s 40th anniversary year, “Trigger” extends the conversation around identity, considering how even a fluid conception of gender is nonetheless marked by ongoing negotiations of power and cannot be understood outside its complex intersections with race, class, sexuality, and disability. The exhibition’s title, “Trigger,” takes into account that word’s range of meanings, variously problematic and potent; the term evokes both traumatic recall and mechanisms that, set into motion, are capable of igniting radical change.

The exhibition features more than forty artists working across a variety of mediums and genres, including film, video, performance, painting, sculpture, photography, and craft. Many embrace explicit pleasure and visual lushness as political strategies, and some deliberately reject or complicate overt representation, turning to poetic language, docufiction, and abstraction to affirm ambiguities and reflect shifting physical embodiment. The artists in “Trigger” share a desire to contest repressive orders and to speculate on new forms and aesthetics—a desire to picture other futures. For many, developing new vocabularies necessarily entails a generative reworking of historical configurations. Representing no single point of view, and in some cases presenting productively contradictory positions, “Trigger” assembles artists for their singular efforts in considering gender’s capacity to represent a more general refusal of stable categorization—a refusal at the heart of today’s most compelling artistic practices.” — Introductory Wall Text

Left to right: Sondra Perry, 2017; Josh Faught, The Mauve Decade I & II, 2014; Simone Leigh, Signs and Grips, 2017

Right: Tschabalala Self, Mista & Mrs, 2016; Floor Dance, 2016; Mane, 2016; Loner, 2016

Insatallation view

Justin Vivian Bond, My Model / My Self: I’ll Stand by You, 2013-2017

Installation view

Front: Ektor Garcia, cuiloni, 2017

Installation view

Installation view

Installation View

Troy Michie. Nobody Knows My Name, 2015; The Shadows are Vast, 2013; La Bicicleta, 2015; Arroyo, 2015

Christina Quarles. Left to right: Butt Hidden in Lacy Groves (Hell Must be a Pretty Place), 2017; Then Tha Dust Settles, 2017; We Gunna Spite Our Noses Right Offa Our Faces, 2017; Din’t We, Didn’t I Have a Gud Time Now?, 2017

Installation view

Stanya Kahn, Installation, 2010-2017

Liz Collins, Cave of Secrets, 2000-2017

“Trigger: Gender as a Tool and a Weapon” is curated by Johanna Burton, Keith Haring Director and Curator of Education and Public Engagement, with Sara O’Keeffe, Assistant Curator, and Natalie Bell, Assistant Curator.

Petrit Halilaj: RU at New Museum, September 27, 2017 – January 7, 2018

Photographs by Corrado Serra.

“Petrit Halilaj (b. 1986, Kostërrc, Skenderaj-Kosovo) often uses his own biography as a point of departure, adopting exhibition processes to alter the course of private and collective histories. Encompassing sculpture, drawing, text, and video, many of Halilaj’s works incorporate materials from his native Kosovo and manifest as ambitious spatial installations through which the artist translates personal relationships into sculptural forms.

For his New Museum exhibition, Halilaj presents a major new project that begins in Runik, the city in Kosovo in which he grew up and the site of one of the earliest Neolithic settlements in the region, where some of Kosovo’s most important artifacts have been found. Archaeological digs in 1968 and 1983 uncovered part of the country’s most significant material history from the period, including the musical instrument known as the Runik Ocarina. Now spread across two countries and several institutions as the result of the Kosovo War in the 1990s, the most valuable of these objects currently reside in storage at the Natural History Museum in Belgrade, with the less significant finds still kept at the Kosovo Museum in Pristina. Out of public reach and inaccessible to the people of Runik, these objects hold great symbolic value for a nation missing parts of its shared frame of reference, but also point to the condition of contradictory claims from two countries that share material heritage.

In “Petrit Halilaj: RU,” Halilaj presents a new video work, several large fabric sculptures, and an extensive environment that draws on his research into the flight patterns and habitats of migratory birds. Piecing together multiple institutional and archeological records coming from sources across borders, Halilaj makes the full extent of the findings in Runik available to the public for the first time. Recreating a total of 505 found and recorded objects and fragments as birds who have temporarily taken residence in an imagined landscape, Halilaj envisions these artifacts on temporary stopover, momentarily reunited as beings who live and thrive through movement, rather than belonging to any one site or context.” — New Museum

This exhibition is curated by Helga Christoffersen, Assistant Curator.

Lumia: Thomas Wilfred and the Art of Light at Smithsonian American Art Museum, October 6 – January 7, 2018

Lumia: Thomas Wilfred and the Art of Light restores this pioneering artist to his rightful place in the history of modern art. This groundbreaking exhibition presents 15 of Wilfred’s spellbinding light compositions, shown together for the Prst time in nearly 50 years. As early as 1919—well before the advent of consumer television and video technology—Wilfred (1889–1968) began experimenting with light as his primary artistic medium, developing a new art form of sophisticated light sculptures that project moving images, which he referred to collectively as “lumia.” Notable artists of his time, such as Jackson Pollock, László Moholy-Nagy and Katherine Dreier, recognized Wilfred as an innovator. In the intervening years, Wilfred disappeared from the story of American modernism as his works became hard to maintain and were consequently relegated to museums’ storage. Presented in their original form, after extensive research and reassembly by conservators at the Yale University Art Gallery and the Museum of Modern Art, the resulting compositions display ever-changing colored forms against a black background, like an aurora borealis emerging from and disappearing into the night sky. Lumia brings Wilfred’s avant-garde work to life for a new generation.” — American Art Museum

Thomas Wilfred Sitting at the Clavilux “Model E,” about 1924. Sepia-toned photograph. Thomas Wilfred Papers, Manuscripts and Archives, Yale University Library, New Haven, Conn.

Thomas Wilfred, Vertical Sequence, Op. 136, 1940. Metal, glass, electrical and lighting elements, and a frosted-glass screen in an oak cabinet; 37 hrs., 28 mins., 47 secs. Carol and Eugene Epstein Collection. Photo: Rebecca Vera-Martinez

Thomas Wilfred, Lumia Suite, Op. 158, 1963–64. Projectors, reflector unit, electrical and lighting elements, and a projection screen; approx. 9 yrs., 127 days, 18 hrs. Museum of Modern Art, New York, Mrs. Simon Guggenheim Fund, 582.1964. Photo: Courtesy Yale University Art Gallery

Thomas Wilfred, Study in Depth, Op. 152, 1959. Projector, reflector units, electrical and lighting elements, and a projection screen; 142 days, 2 hrs., 10 mins. Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, Gift of Bristol-Myers Squibb by transfer from the National Museum of American History, Behring Center, 2004, 04.2. Photo: Courtesy Yale University Art Gallery

Thomas Wilfred, Visual Counterpoint, Op. 140, 1950. Metal, glass, electrical and lighting elements, and a frosted-glass screen in an aluminum cabinet; 11 hrs., 7 mins., 30 secs. Carol and Eugene Epstein Collection. Photo: Rebecca Vera-Martinez

Thomas Wilfred, Nocturne, Op. 148, 1958. Metal, glass, electrical and lighting elements, and a frostedglass screen in an oak cabinet; 5 yrs., 359 days, 19 hrs., 20 mins., 48 secs. Carol and Eugene Epstein Collection. Photo: Rebecca Vera-Martinez

Thomas Wilfred, Unit #50, Elliptical Prelude and Chalice, from the First Table Model Clavilux (Luminar) series, 1928. Metal, fabric, glass, and electrical and lighting elements on a maple table. Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Conn., Gift of Thomas C. Wilfred, 1983.66.1. Photo: Courtesy Yale University Art Gallery

Thomas Wilfred, Unit #86, from the Clavilux Junior (First Home Clavilux Model) series, 1930. Metal, glass, electrical and lighting elements, and an illustration-board screen in a wood cabinet. Carol and Eugene Epstein Collection. Photo: Courtesy Yale University Art Gallery

Thomas Wilfred, Untitled, Op. 161, 1965. Metal, glass, electrical and lighting elements, and a frostedglass screen in an oak cabinet; 1 yr., 315 days, 12 hrs. Carol and Eugene Epstein Collection.

Thomas Wilfred, The Clavilux Silent Visual Carillon, 1928. Gouache and watercolor on paper, mounted on cardboard. Thomas Wilfred Papers, Manuscripts and Archives, Yale University Library, New Haven, Conn. Photo: Courtesy Yale University Art Gallery

Thomas Wilfred, Lumia Diagram, about 1940–50. Ink on paper. Thomas Wilfred Papers, Manuscripts and Archives, Yale University Library, New Haven, Conn. Photo: Courtesy Yale University Art Gallery

Poster advertisement for The Art Pioneer Thomas Wilfred in a Clavilux Recital, about 1926. Red printing ink on paper. Thomas Wilfred Papers, Manuscripts and Archives, Yale University Library, New Haven, Conn. Photo: Courtesy Yale University Art Gallery

Lumia: Thomas Wilfred and the Art of Light was organized by Keely Orgeman, the Alice and Allan Kaplan Assistant Curator of American Paintings and Sculpture at the Yale University Art Gallery.

Images courtesy American Art Museum.

Drawn to Greatness: Master Drawings from the Thaw Collection at The Morgan Library & Museum, through January 7, 2018

“The Thaw Collection is considered among the foremost private collections of drawings assembled over the last half century. It was first promised to the Morgan in 1975 by Eugene V. Thaw, now a Life Trustee, and the museum received the full collection of 424 works in early 2017. In honor of this extraordinary gift—one of the most important in the history of the museum—the Morgan presents Drawn to Greatness: Master Drawings from the Thaw Collection.

The exhibition includes more than 150 masterworks from the Renaissance to the twentieth century. A partial list of artists represented includes Mantegna, Rubens, Rembrandt, Canaletto, Watteau, Piranesi, Fragonard, Goya, Turner, Ingres, Daumier, Degas, Cézanne, Redon, Gauguin, van Gogh, Matisse, Picasso, and Pollock.” — Morgan Library

“It is difficult to summarize in a few words what the acquisition of the Thaw Collection means to the Morgan but ‘transformative’ may be the best single way to describe it,” said Director Colin B. Bailey. “The great range of artists, schools, and regions represented is remarkable. Moreover, the quality of the individual drawings reflects Gene Thaw’s exceptional critical eye—and his keen intellectual curiosity. Over the years Gene’s passionate commitment to the Morgan has never wavered and we can think of no better way to honor him and his late wife, Clare, than to present this exhibition of some of the greatest works from their collection.”

Andrea Mantegna (1431–1506), Three Standing Saints, ca. 1450-1455, pen and brown ink on paper toned with red chalk, Thaw Collection, The Morgan Library & Museum, 1985.100. Photography by Steven H. Crossot, 2014.

Vittore Carpaccio (1455? – 1525?), Virgin and Child with Saints in a Landscape, ca. 1500–1510, pen and brown ink and wash over red and black chalk, Thaw Collection, The Morgan Library & Museum, 2006.46. Photography by Steven H. Crossot.

Jan Bruegel (1568 – 1625), A View of the Tiber in Rome with the Ponte Sisto and Saint Peter’s in the Distance, ca. 1594, pen and brown ink and wash and blue watercolor over black chalk, Thaw Collection, The Morgan Library & Museum, 2017.20. Photography by Steven H. Crossot.

Rembrandt van Rijn (1606–1669), Four Musicians with Wind Instruments, ca. 1638, pen and brown and black ink and brown wash, and red and yellow chalk, Thaw Collection, The Morgan Library & Museum, 2004.42. Photography by Steven H. Crossot, 2014.

Giovanni Domenico Tiepolo (1727–1804), Scene of Contemporary Life: The Picture Show, 1791, pen and brown and black ink and wash over black chalk, Thaw Collection, The Morgan Library & Museum, 2017.253. Photography by Steven H. Crossot, 2014.

Antoine Watteau (1684–1721), Young Woman Wearing a Chemise, ca. 1718, black, red, and white chalk, Thaw Collection, The Morgan Library & Museum, 2000.53. Photography by Steven H. Crossot, 2014.

Jean-Honoré Fragonard (1732–1806), The Little Park, ca. 1765, paque watercolor over graphite, Thaw Collection, The Morgan Library & Museum, 1997.85. Photography by Steven H. Crossot, 2014.

J. M. W. Turner (1775–1851), The Pass of St. Gotthard, near Faido, 1843, watercolor over graphite, Thaw Collection, The Morgan Library & Museum, 2006.52. Photography by Steven H. Crossot, 2014.

Francisco de Goya (1746–1828), Leave it all to Providence (Dejalo todo a la probidencia), 1816-20, black ink and gray wash, Thaw Collection, The Morgan Library & Museum, 1999.22. Photography by Steven H. Crossot, 2014.

Eugène Delacroix (1798–1863), Moroccans Outside the Walls of Tangier, 19th century, watercolor and opaque white watercolor over graphite on wove paper, Thaw Collection, The Morgan Library & Museum, 2017.65. Photography by Steven H. Crossot, 2014.

Hilaire-Germain-Edgar Degas (1834 – 1917), Seated Dancer, 1871-72, oil paint over graphite on pink paper, Thaw Collection, The Morgan Library & Museum, 2017.54. Photography by Steven H. Crossot, 2014.

Paul Cézanne (1839 – 1906), The Bathers, ca. 1900, watercolor over graphite, Thaw Collection, The Morgan Library & Museum, 2017.29. Photography by Steven H. Crossot, 2014.

Vincent van Gogh (1853–1890), Letter to Paul Gauguin, 17 October 1888, with a sketch of Bedroom at Arles, pen and brown ink on graph paper, Thaw Collection, The Morgan Library & Museum, MA 6447. Given in honor of Charles E. Pierce, Jr., 2007. Photography by Graham S. Haber, 2016.

Paul Gauguin (1848–1903), Crouching Tahitian Woman Seen from the Back, ca. 1902, monotype in watercolor with opaque white watercolor, Thaw Collection, The Morgan Library & Museum, 2017.90. Photography by Graham S. Haber, 2011.

Jackson Pollock (1912–1956), Untitled [Drawing for P.G.], ca. 1943, pen and black ink and wash, green ink wash, red colored pencil, and orange watercolor pencil © 2017 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Drawn to Greatness is organized by the Morgan Library & Museum, New York. The curator of the exhibition is Jennifer Tonkovich, Eugene and Clare Thaw Curator of Drawing and Prints.

Images courtesy The Morgan Library.

Leonardo to Matisse: Master Drawings from the Robert Lehman Collection at The Met Fifth Avenue, October 4, 2017 – January 7, 2018

“Featuring highlights of European drawing from the Robert Lehman Collection, this exhibition presents works by preeminent masters from the Renaissance to the modern age, including Leonardo da Vinci, Albrecht Dürer, Rembrandt, Georges Seurat, and Henri Matisse. The selection reflects significant developments in the medium between the fifteenth and twentieth centuries, as styles, techniques, and genres evolved, evoking illuminating comparisons across regions and eras. From portraits, figure studies, and landscapes to mythological and biblical narratives, the drawings represent a dynamic array of sacred and secular subjects in media ranging from metalpoint, pen and ink, and chalk to graphite, pastel, and charcoal.

The role of drawing as the foundation of all the visual arts is illustrated by numerous preparatory studies for painting, sculpture, tapestry, engraving, and stained glass, including some very rare examples. Elucidating the varying stages of the design process, the works on view include rapid preliminary sketches, detailed studies of motifs, expansive compositional designs, and finished drawings intended for patrons. Beginning in the Renaissance, drawing was increasingly valued as an autonomous art form and a means of creative expression. Two remarkable examples that provide a glimpse into the exploratory process of Renaissance masters are Leonardo’s Study of a Bear, which epitomizes his keen observation of the natural world, and Dürer’s iconic Self-Portrait, an embodiment of his awakening artistic self-consciousness.

The exhibition is the first to present the full range of Robert Lehman’s vast and distinguished drawings collection (numbering more than seven hundred sheets) and the first to explore his significant activity as a drawings collector from the 1920s to the 1960s.” — Introductory Wall Text

Leonardo da Vinci. Italian, Vinci 1452–1519 Amboise. A Bear Walking, ca. 1482–85. Silverpoint on light buff prepared paper; 4 1/16 x 5 1/4 in. (10.3 x 13.3 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Robert Lehman Collection, 1975

Albrecht Dürer. German, Nuremberg 1471–1528 Nuremberg. Self-portrait, Study of a Hand and a Pillow (recto); Six Studies of Pillows (verso), 1493. Pen and brown ink; 10 15/16 x 7 15/16 in. (27.8 x 20.2 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Robert Lehman Collection, 1975

Rembrandt (Rembrandt van Rijn) (Dutch, Leiden 1606–1669 Amsterdam). The Last Supper, after Leonardo da Vinci, 1634–35. Red chalk; 14 1/4 x 18 11/16 in. (36.2 x 47.5 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Robert Lehman Collection, 1975

Antoine Watteau. French, Valenciennes 1684–1721 Nogent-sur-Marne. Seated Woman, 1716–17. Black, red and white chalk; 9 7/16 x 5 7/16 in. (24 x 13.8 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Robert Lehman Collection, 1975

Goya (Francisco de Goya y Lucientes) (Spanish, Fuendetodos 1746–1828 Bordeaux). Self-Portrait in a Cocked Hat, ca. 1790. Pen and brown (iron gall?) ink on paper; 3 7/8 x 3 7/16 in. (9.8 x 8.8 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Robert Lehman Collection, 1975

Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres. French, Montauban 1780–1867 Paris. Study for “Raphael and the Fornarina”(?), ca. 1814(?). Graphite on white wove paper; 10 x 7 3/4 in. (25.4 x 19.7 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Robert Lehman Collection, 1975

Vincent van Gogh. Dutch, Zundert 1853–1890 Auvers-sur-Oise. Road in Etten, 1881. Chalk, pencil, pastel, watercolor. Underdrawing in pen and brown ink. 15 1/2 x 22 3/4 in. (39.4 x 57.8 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Robert Lehman Collection, 1975

Leonardo to Matisse is organized by Dita Amory, Curator in Charge, and Alison Nogueira, Associate Curator, both of the Robert Lehman Collection at The Met. The exhibition is made possible by the Robert Lehman Foundation.

Images courtesy The Metropolitan Museum of Art.