Machu Picchu and the Golden Empires of Peru at Boca Raton Museum of Art, October 16, 2021 – March 6, 2022

Machu Picchu and the Golden Empires of Peru makes its world premiere in South Florida at the Boca Raton Museum of Art, beginning on October 16, 2021.

The museum experience consists of one of the most impressive gold collections ever to tour the globe, highlighted by a fully intact Gold attire of a Chimú Emperor that dates to 1300 AD, predating the Inca Empire. On loan from Museo Larco and Museo Manuel Chávez Ballon, the exhibition features a stunning selection of 192 priceless artifacts that include the spectacular gold and silver royal burial garments of legendary Andean lords.

This all-new, media-rich, artifact-based museum experience transpors guests into the jewel of the only cradle of civilization in the Southern Hemisphere, the Incan city of Machu Picchu. The exhibition focuses on ancient societies that predate the Inca empire. Rivaled only by Ancient Egypt in longevity and by the Roman Empire in engineering, Andean societies dominated a substantial segment of South America for over 3,000 years.

Visitors to the exhibition will embark on a journey through time and discover a culture that thrived in a genuinely spiritual civilization.” — Boca Raton Museum of Art

Sculptural stirrup spout bottle depicting an anthropomorphic figure with supernatural traits (hero Ai Apaec) holding a knife or tumi. He is wearing a half-moon headdress or crown with a monkey’s head, feline fangs, face paint, shirt with designs of serpents and circles, and wristbands with geometric designs. This piece depicts the transformation of the hero Ai Apaec to a puffer fish after fighting and conquering it in the sea. Mochica. Boom Period (1 AD – 800 AD)
Sculptural stirrup spout bottle depicting a hybrid zoomorphic figure (rampant feline / Moon Animal / Dog or Lunar Fox / Andean dragon). The piece contains details achieved by incrusting 148 shell beads (mother-of-pearl, genus Strombus). Many of them are fragmented. The figure’s eye is chrysocolla. This zoomorphic figure is associated with the night sky. Mochica. Boom Period (1 AD – 800 AD)
Sculptural pitcher depicting an anthropomorphic figure with the head and wings of a long-eared owl or barn owl, necklace of circular beads, shirt with designs of interlaced waves or spirals, and short skirt; the figure is standing under an arch formed by a serpent with two feline heads. There are wave designs on the pitcher’s neck. Mochica, Boom Period (1 AD – 800 AD)
Frontal adornment of gold headdress depicting feline head with feathers, bird-beak nose, and figure with headdress of plumes and triangular pendants, depiction of two animals (monkeys) on the upper part, stepped designs with volutes and two-headed-serpent designs on the lower part. Chimu. Imperial Period (1300 AD – 1532 AD)
Copper funerary mask with applications of shell and stone, depicting an anthropomorphic visage with feline fangs (Ai Apaec). Mochica. Boom Period (1 AD – 800 AD)
Gold and turquoise nose ornament depicting figure with half-moon and club-head headdress, circular ear ornaments and loincloth, holding a rattle. Mochica. Boom Period (1 AD – 800 AD)
Frontal adornment of 18-karat gold headdress depicting a feline head with half-moon headdress and two birds. The gold is a gold-copper-silver ternary alloy with chemical composition of 78.5% gold, 12.5% copper, and 9% silver. The piece received a final treatment known as depletion gilding. Mochica. Boom Period (1 AD – 800 AD)
Ear ornament of gold, shell, and stone (turquoise or malachite), depicting eight iguanas. Four of the iguanas are gold and four are turquoise. Mochica. Boom Period (1 AD – 800 AD)

Images courtesy Boca Raton Museum of Art.

un/mute at Austrian Cultural Forum New York, through January 7, 2022 & at Undercurrent through November 21, 2021

“The Austrian Cultural Forum New York and Undercurrent unveil un/mute, an international group exhibition of collaborative works by 28 artists across multiple disciplines. On view at both locations, this multi-media exhibition is the culmination of an 18-month-long project that was launched in 2020 to provide European and NYC-based artists an opportunity for critical exchange and collaboration during the COVID-19 global pandemic.

What do communication and collaboration mean in a time of uncertainty and isolation? How is the artistic process impacted by going ‘fully remote’? In un/mute, artists from 10 countries were paired to explore these questions. We recognize that effective communication requires active engagement of all the senses and an openness to diversity, interpretation and digitalization. But what does that look like in practice? The project challenged teams to overcome the limitations of lockdowns as they connected across artistic mediums, language, culture, generations and time zones to find new forms of expression and meaning within art. 

un/mute is the physical manifestation of online conversations among strangers who became collaborators. What began as abstract, ephemeral and digital are now 14 tactile, analog and concrete artworks presented across two locations. The artists confronted the parameters imposed by the lockdowns and each team found creative solutions that we might all learn from. The common thread that runs through the sculptures, installations, films, drawings, photographs and performances is the importance of language.” — Austrian Cultural Forum & Undercurrent

Austrian Cultural Forum New York 

Mo Kong (NYC) + Olesja Katšanovskaja-Münd (Estonia). Backwards Transition, 2021. Rock and video. Runtime: 26 sec.
Mariella Cassar-Cordina (Malta) + Nicola Ginzel (Austria). Sonos Civitatem MMXX, 2020. Video,frottage and sheet music. Runtime: 9 minutes, 44 seconds.
Mariella Cassar-Cordina (Malta) + Nicola Ginzel (Austria). Sonos Civitatem MMXX (sheet music), 2020.
Justyna Górowska (Poland) + Ieva Mediodia (Lithuania). ARKTIKAANTARKTIKA 0.9, 2021. Giclee on Hahnemuhle. Photo Rag paper 13.5 x 41 inches. Video Runtime: 3 minutes, 17 seconds.
Justyna Górowska (Poland) + Ieva Mediodia (Lithuania). ARKTIKAANTARKTIKA 0.9 (detail), 2021.
Ada Van Hoorebeke (Flanders) + Luisa Muhr (Austria). Stoff Stuk / Go-to Shapes, 2021.
Gabrielė Gervickaitė (Lithuania) + Yi Hsuan Lai (NYC). Where are you at this moment? – Bounding touch. Where are you at this moment? – Joint. Where are you at this moment? – Dancing in the day and night. (left to right), 2021. Aluminum prints, 40 x 30 inches each.
Gabrielė Gervickaitė (Lithuania) + Yi Hsuan Lai (NYC). A dialogue in the cloud, 2021, unique zine, 8.25 x 10.5 inches.
Alex Mirutziu (Romania) + Sydney Shavers (NYC). Alex Mirutziu. Seven places I can’t go to but talk to, 2021. Plaster and fishing line. Dimensions variable. Sydney Shavers. Untitled (Sit) 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 2021. Wood, paint and fasteners, 24 x 10 x 24 inches each.
Alex Camilleri (Malta) + Terttu Uibopuu (Estonia). 76% Humidity, Chance of Rain, 2020. Film Runtime: 3 minutes, 12 seconds.
Kris Grey (NYC) +Barbara Maria Neu (Austria). Miss(ing), 2021. video (runtime: 4 minutes, 8 seconds), performance (15 minutes) and sculptures.
Eren Aksu (Germany) + Sheila Maldonado (NYC). STILL, 2021. Carousel with 62 slides and printed text (8.5 x 11 inches).
Aaron Bezzina (Malta) + Kyle Hittmeier (NYC). Aaron Bezzina, Double Catapult, 2021. Wood, screws, stain varnish and rubber 102.4 x 62 x 40 inches
Aaron Bezzina (Malta) + Kyle Hittmeier (NYC). Kyle Hittmeier, Andromeda, 2021. Single channel projection. Edition 1 of 3. Runtime: 1 minute, 50 seconds.

Undercurrent

Lan Thao Lam (NYC) + Sanne De Wilde (Flanders, Belgium). HERE/tHERE, 2021. Site-specific window installation. Full color adhesive vinyl, ACFNY, 101 x 60 inches, 101 x 22 inches.
Anna Bera (Poland) + Saddie Choua (Flanders, Belgium). Close Up Black, 2020-21. Video, sound, and personal objects (plants, ornamental animals, book, drawing and photos). Runtime: 8 minutes.
Emily Shanahan (NYC) + Marie Lukáčová (Czech Republic). Conversations between February and May, 2021. A collection of drawings and Risographs from each artist. Emily Shanahan, Grid drawing, 2021, collage, ink, and graphite on paper, 14″ x 11″ each. Marie Lukáčová, Snakes, 2021, 4 color Risograph, edition of 30 each with unique titles, 16.5″ x 11.4″ each.
Emily Shanahan (NYC) + Marie Lukáčová (Czech Republic). Conversations between February and May (detail), 2021.

Exhibition was co-curated by Daina Mattis and Melinda Wang.

Images courtesy Austrian Cultural Forum New York & Undercurrent.

Priscilla Aleman: Origins of Devotion at Wave Hill, October 16 – December 5, 2021

“Priscilla Aleman transforms the Sunroom into a devotional environment that references the body as an innate, recurring symbol used in ceremonies to convey the sacred, the afterlife and the deities of our time. In an homage to traditional sculptures and ancient symbolism, Aleman examines material culture and ecological transformations in the Americas, creating sites for ritualized performances and spiritual contemplation. Citing the ocean as a connective tissue, Origins of Devotion speculates about historic and imagined moments of contact between peoples of the Global South, bringing together materials collected from related regions, including belongings from Aleman’s Caribbean family members, replicas of pre-Columbian artifacts and tropical flora from various horticultural facilities, including Wave Hill.” — Wave Hill

“Having worked closely with Priscilla on this project for almost two years, I found it compelling to see how the installation evolved as she honed in on the social, cultural, physical and spiritual interconnections between humans and the land, more specifically teasing out connections to Yemaya, a water goddess in African diasporic cultures. Discussions with Wave Hill’s horticulturalists about the Aquatic and Monocot gardens further informed Aleman’s incorporation of water elements and tropical plants, such as the banana leaf, into her,” says Jeng Lynch.

Priscilla Aleman, Origins of Devotion, 2021 (in progress), gypsum, Florida rainwater, tears, palm leaves, rubber, blue tarp and ceramic replicas of fruits grown by family, dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist and YoungArts.
Priscilla Aleman, Origins of Devotion, 2021 (in progress), gypsum, Florida rainwater, tears, palm leaves, rubber, blue tarp and ceramic replicas of fruits grown by family, dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist and YoungArts.
Priscilla Aleman, Origins of Devotion, 2021 (in progress), gypsum, Florida rainwater, tears, palm leaves, rubber, blue tarp and ceramic replicas of fruits grown by family, dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist and YoungArts.
Priscilla Aleman, Origins of Devotion, 2021 (in progress), gypsum, Florida rainwater, tears, palm leaves, rubber, blue tarp and ceramic replicas of fruits grown by family, dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist and YoungArts.
Priscilla Aleman, Stillness is in the Eye of the Hurricane, 2021 (detail), plaster, blue hurricane tarp, collected palm boots, coconuts, mamey seeds, avocados from the Deering Estate, tree snails collected by grandparents, fragment of US-1, women’s softball cleats, palm tree leaves, painter’s tape, sapote, ceramics, 25 x 25 x 5 feet. Courtesy of the artist and YoungArts.
Priscilla Aleman, Banana Boat, 2021, mixed media, 10 x 7 x 1 inches. Courtesy of the artist and YoungArts.
Priscilla Aleman, Only Kings and High Priests, 2021, mixed media, 10 x 7 x 1 inches. Courtesy of the artist and YoungArts.
Priscilla Aleman, Oils and Herbs, 2021, mixed media, 10 x 7 x 1 inches. Courtesy of the artist and YoungArts.
Priscilla Aleman, Transcendance, 2021, mixed media, 10 x 7 x 1 inches. Courtesy of the artist and YoungArts.
Priscilla Aleman, Submerge, 2021, mixed media, 10 x 7 x 1 inches. Courtesy of the artist and YoungArts.
Priscilla Aleman in her studio at YoungArts in Miami, FL. Courtesy of the artist and YoungArts.

An acclaimed public garden and cultural center in the Bronx, Wave Wave Hill’s landscape serves as a catalyst for emerging artists exhibiting in its Sunroom Project Space. The 2021 season’s seven installations round out with Priscilla Aleman’s Origins of Devotion. Aleman will also participate in an onsite “Meet the Artist” talk with Eileen Jeng Lynch, Wave Hill’s Curator of Visual Arts.

The Sunroom Project Space is organized by Curator of Visual Arts Eileen Jeng Lynch. Wave Hill’s curatorial team also includes Gabriel de Guzman (Director of Arts and Chief Curator) and Jesse Bandler Firestone (Curatorial Assistant).

Images courtesy Wave Hill.

Lino Tagliapietra: Journey at Heller Gallery, October 8 – November 6, 2021

“Legendary Italian glassblower, artist & teacher Lino Tagliapietra, who just celebrated his 87th birthday, started his career at the age of twelve, as an apprentice in a glass factory on his native island of Murano.  He earned the title of maestro vetraio (master glassmaker) at twenty-one, and in the late 1970s set off to pursue the path of a studio artist. In July 2021, after more than 75 years in the hotshop, he announced his retirement from the furnace to afford himself the freedom to pursue projects beyond glassblowing.

Tagliapietra’s glass forms are firmly based in the 20th century Italian design idiom. Each of his pieces is a de-facto encyclopedia of classical Muranese glassmaking techniques characterized by bold colors and exuberant patterning. His work radiates vibrant optimism and effortless virtuosity.” — Heller Gallery

LINO TAGLIAPIETRA, SPIGOITONDI, 2021, glass, 17 1/2 x 12 1/4 x 5 1/4 in. (44.5 x 31.1 x 13.3 cm).
LINO TAGLIAPIETRA, FENICE, 2012, glass, 13 x 47 x 4 3/4 in. (33 x 119.4 x 12.1 cm).
LINO TAGLIAPIETRA, MEDUSA, 2006, glass, 19 1/2 x 18 1/4 x 7 in. (49.5 x 46.4 x 17.8 cm).
LINO TAGLIAPIETRA, FUJI, 2017, glass, 33 1/4 x 15 1/2 x 6 in.
(84.5 x 39.4 x 15.2 cm).
LINO TAGLIAPIETRA, APOLLINEO, 2019, glass, 13 1/2 x 10 1/2 x 9 1/4 in. (34.3 x 26.7 x 23.5 cm).
LINO TAGLIAPIETRA, AVVENTURINE CASE, 2012, glass, 9 1/4 x 38 3/4 x 5 1/2 in. (23.5 x 98.4 x 14 cm).
LINO TAGLIAPIETRA, BATMAN, 2000, glass, 10 3/4 x 11 x 4 1/2 in. (27.3 x 27.9 x 11.4 cm).
LINO TAGLIAPIETRA, MANDARA, 2005, glass, 21 x 11 1/4 x 7 1/4 in. (53.3 x 28.6 x 18.4 cm).
LINO TAGLIAPIETRA, VIENNA, 2009, glass, 21 x 14 x 7 1/2 in. (53.3 x 35.6 x 19.1 cm).
LINO TAGLIAPIETRA, MANDARA 751, 2013, glass, 19 1/2 x 18 3/4 x 7 1/2 in. (49.5 x 47.6 x 19.1 cm).
LINO TAGLIAPIETRA, ASTURIA, 2003, glass,12 1/4 x 10 3/4 x 5 3/4 in. (31.1 x 27.3 x 14.6 cm).

Art historian and curator Tina Oldknow summarized his influence: “Today, artists from around the world use a Venetian glass vocabulary to make work that would never, ever be produced in Venice, and the dissemination of this remarkably creative and vibrant craft language may be Lino’s most important legacy. Lino came to America to discover what there might be here for him and to teach others to work glass. In the process, he helped to pioneer an industry – not for commerce, but for art.”

Exhibition was curated by Douglas Heller.

Images courtesy Heller Gallery.

Rogelio López Marín (GORY): At The Intersections of Photography, Music, and Design at LnS Gallery, Miami, October 1 – November 6, 2021

“Gory, a street photographer, describes his practice as one in which he randomly explores the street to discover a scene of visual interest. He intuits that “images come to him” as opposed to being artificially arranged. Gory is captivated by scenes perceived to have an undiscovered, hidden, or unusual quality. When he happens upon a scene, in the quiet of the night, without people nearby, he recognizes its undiscovered, hidden, or unusual qualities.The fascinating results yield an unexpected atmosphere and mood—characteristics that define his gaze. Gory adopted Glen Miller’s song title “Moonlight Serenade” because it resonates with the subject of the photographic series—of houses, cars, abandoned trains, trolleys, a vintage drugstore, and a bar that would not have had the attraction they did had the artist seen them during daylight. “Moonlight Serenade” was also music that Gory and his wife Lucia, a poet, listened to together, in its many variations, throughout the years. The exhibition is dedicated to her memory.” — Paragraph from the exhibition’s essay “The Night Comes First” by Julia P. Herzberg, Ph.D.

Rogelio López Marín (Gory). Classic Cars, 2012
Rogelio López Marín (Gory). Road Blocked by a Low Yellow Metal Rail, 2012
Rogelio López Marín (Gory). Pebble Road with a Yellow Open Metal Rail, 2012
Rogelio López Marín (Gory). Pebbles under the Guardrail, 2012
Rogelio López Marín (Gory). Stone Building with Interior Bathrooms, 2012
Rogelio López Marín (Gory). Old Black Car, Mail Boxes, and Trailer Home, 2012
Rogelio López Marín (Gory). Covered Car, White House, and Blue Decorative Shutters, 2015
Rogelio López Marín (Gory). Three Miami Trolleys -03, -05, -01, 2014
Rogelio López Marín (Gory). Allen’s Drugs, 2012
Rogelio López Marín (Gory).Abandoned Yellow Train Car, 2012
Rogelio López Marín (Gory). Black Car and Street Mural, 2013
Rogelio López Marín (Gory). Yellow Vintage Car on a Lift, 2013
Rogelio López Marín (Gory). Las Rosas and David Bowie, 2018

The exhibition was curated by Julia P. Herzberg, Ph.D.

All photographs are digital prints on luster paper, edition of 5 + 2AP, 20 x 30 inches. Images courtesy LnS Gallery.

Etel Adnan: Light’s New Measure at Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, October 8, 2021 – January 10, 2022

“The Solomon R. Guggenheim presents Etel Adnan: Light’s New Measure. This focused survey, installed along the first two ramps of the museum’s rotunda, marks the first solo exhibition of the artist’s work at a New York City institution.

Over the course of a lifetime that spans almost a century, Etel Adnan’s creative and intellectual vision has been expressed in many forms. In addition to being a visual artist, she is a renowned poet, a prominent journalist, and the author of Sitt Marie Rose (1977), one of the defining novels of the modern Arab world. Adnan’s biography is notable for its rich convergence of cultural influences. She was born in Beirut in 1925 to a Greek mother and Syrian father; grew up speaking French, Arabic, and Greek; and as an adult has lived for extended periods in Lebanon, the United States, and France. She began to paint in the late 1950s, while working as a professor of philosophy in Northern California. It was a period when, in protest of France’s colonial rule in Algeria, she renounced writing in French and declared that she would begin ‘painting in Arabic’.” — Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

Etel Adnan, Untitled, 1983. Oil on canvas, 29 × 29 in. (73.7 × 73.7 cm). Private collection. © Etel Adnan
Etel Adnan, Untitled, 1985. Oil on canvas, 30 × 29 in. (76.2 × 73.7 cm). Private collection. © Etel Adnan
Etel Adnan, Untitled, 2010. Oil on canvas, 7 7/8 × 9 7/8 in. (20 × 25 cm). Collection of Karen E. Wagner and David L. Caplan, New York. © Etel Adnan
Etel Adnan, Untitled, 2010. Oil on canvas, 9 1/2 × 11 3/4 in. (24 × 30 cm). Private collection, New York. © Etel Adnan
Etel Adnan, Untitled, 2014. Oil on canvas, 13 3/4 × 10 5/8 in. (35 × 27 cm). Collection of Ellen and Alan Meckler. © Etel Adnan
Etel Adnan, Le poids du monde 11, 2016. Oil on canvas, 11 3/4 × 9 1/2 in. (30 × 24 cm). Collection of Ellen and Alan Meckler. © Etel Adnan
Etel Adnan, Untitled, 2018. Oil on canvas, 16 1/8 × 13 1/8 in. (40.9 × 33.2 cm). Courtesy the Artist and White Cube © Etel Adnan
Etel Adnan, Untitled, ca. 1995–2000. Oil on canvas, 7 7/8 × 9 7/8 in. (20 × 25 cm). Collection of Yto Barrada. © Etel Adnan
Etel Adnan, Untitled, ca. 1995–2000. Oil on canvas, 7 1/8 × 9 7/8 in. (18.1 × 25.1 cm). Collection of Gary and Tracy Mezzatesta. © Etel Adnan

Etel Adnan: Light’s New Measure is organized by Katherine Brinson, Daskalopoulos Curator, Contemporary Art, and Lauren Hinkson, Associate Curator, Collections.

Images courtesy Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum.

Vasily Kandinsky: Around the Circle at Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, October 8, 2021 – September 5, 2022

“The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum presents Vasily Kandinsky: Around the Circle. Drawing from the Guggenheim’s exceptional collection of works by Kandinsky, the exhibition features approximately eighty paintings, watercolors, and woodcuts, as well as a selection of his illustrated books, spanning the artist’s earlier years in Russia and Germany and through his exile in France at the end of his life. The presentation, installed along the midsection of the museum’s spiral rotunda, reconsiders Kandinsky’s career not as a fixed path from representation to abstraction, but as a circular passage through persistent themes centered around the pursuit of one dominant ideal: the impulse for spiritual expression.” — Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

Vasily Kandinsky, Around the Circle, May–August 1940. Oil and enamel on canvas, 38 1/4 x 57 5/8 inches (97.2 x 146.4 cm), Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Solomon R. Guggenheim Founding Collection 49.1222
Vasily Kandinsky, Capricious Forms (Formes capricieuses), July 1937. Oil on canvas, 35 x 45 3/16 inches (88.9 x 114.8 cm). Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Solomon R. Guggenheim Founding Collection 45.977
Vasily Kandinsky, Dominant Curve (Courbe dominante), April 1936 (detail). Oil on canvas, 50 7/8 × 76 1/2 inches (129.2 × 194.3 cm). Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Solomon R. Guggenheim Founding Collection 45.989
Vasily Kandinsky, Yellow Painting (La toile jaune), July 1938. Oil and enamel on canvas, 45 13/16 x 35 inches (116.4 x 88.9 cm). Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Solomon R. Guggenheim Founding Collection 45.964
Vasily Kandinsky, Striped (Rayé), November 1934. Oil with sand on canvas, 31 7/8 × 39 3/8 inches (81 × 100 cm). Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Solomon R. Guggenheim Founding Collection 46.1022
Vasily Kandinsky, Several Circles (Einige Kreise), January–February 1926. Oil on canvas, 55 3/8 x 55 1/4 inches (140.7 x 140.3 cm). Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Solomon R. Guggenheim Founding Collection, By gift 41.283
Vasily Kandinsky, Three Sounds (Drei Klänge), August 1926. Oil on canvas, 23 3/4 x 23 1/2 inches (60.3 x 59.7 cm). Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Solomon R. Guggenheim Founding Collection, By gift 41.282
Vasily Kandinsky, Composition 8 (Komposition 8), July 1923. Oil on canvas, 55 1/4 x 79 inches (140.3 x 200.7 cm). Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Solomon R. Guggenheim Founding Collection, By gift 37.262
Vasily Kandinsky, Black Lines (Schwarze Linien), December 1913. Oil on canvas, 51 3/8 x 51 5/8 inches (130.5 x 131.1 cm). Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Solomon R. Guggenheim Founding Collection, By gift 37.241
Vasily Kandinsky, Improvisation 28 (Second Version) (Improvisation 28 [zweite Faßung]), 1912. Oil on canvas, 44 5/16 × 64 inches (112.6 × 162.5 cm). Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Solomon R. Guggenheim Founding Collection, By gift 37.239
Vasily Kandinsky, Painting with White Border (Bild mit weißem Rand), May 1913. Oil on canvas, 55 1/4 × 78 7/8 inches (140.3 × 200.3 cm). Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Solomon R. Guggenheim Founding Collection, By gift 37.245
Vasily Kandinsky, Landscape with Factory Chimney (Landschaft mit Fabrikschornstein), 1910. Oil on canvas, 26 × 32 1/4 inches (66 × 81.9 cm). Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Solomon R. Guggenheim Founding Collection, By gift 41.504
Vasily Kandinsky, Blue Mountain (Der blaue Berg), 1908–09. Oil on canvas, 42 1/4 x 38 7/16 inches (107.3 x 97.6 cm). Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Solomon R. Guggenheim Founding Collection, By gift 41.505
Kandinsky in front of his painting Dominant Curve (Courbe dominante, 1936), 1936. Photo: Bibliothèque Kandinsky, Centre Pompidou, Paris. © Lipnitzki/Roger Violett/Getty Images.

Presented concurrently with Vasily Kandinsky: Around the Circle is a solo exhibition that features the work of contemporary artist Etel Adnan, followed by solo exhibitions of the work of Jennie C. Jones, and Cecilia Vicuña. 

Vasily Kandinsky: Around the Circle is organized by Megan Fontanella, Curator, Modern Art and Provenance. 

Images courtesy Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. 

Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg at New-York Historical Society, October 1, 2021 – January 23, 2022

“The New-York Historical Society honors the late Ruth Bader Ginsburg (RBG)—the trailblazing Supreme Court justice and cultural icon—with a special exhibition this fall. Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg is based on the popular Tumblr and bestselling book of the same name. A traveling exhibition organized by the Skirball Cultural Center in Los Angeles, the show takes an expansive and engaging look at the justice’s life and work, highlighting her ceaseless efforts to protect civil rights and foster equal opportunity for all Americans.

Notorious RBG features archival photographs and documents, historical artifacts, contemporary art, media stations, and gallery interactives spanning RBG’s varied roles as student, wife to Martin “Marty” Ginsburg, mother, lawyer, judge, women’s rights pioneer, and internet phenomenon. Highlights include a robe and jabot from RBG’s Supreme Court wardrobe; the official portraits of RBG and Sandra Day O’Connor—the first two women to serve on the Supreme Court—on loan from the National Portrait Gallery; and QR-code listening stations where visitors can hear RBG’s delivery of oral arguments, majority opinions, and forceful dissents in landmark Supreme Court cases on their own devices.” — New-York Historical Society

“It is a great honor that we celebrate Ruth Bader Ginsburg, a native New Yorker whose impact on the lives of contemporary Americans has been extraordinary,” said Dr. Louise Mirrer, president and CEO of New-York Historical. “Justice Ginsburg fought hard to achieve justice and equality for all, inspiring us with her courage and tenacity in upholding our fundamental American ideals. A special friend to New-York Historical, in 2018 she presided over a naturalization ceremony in our auditorium. The exhibition is a memorial tribute to her achievements and legacy.”

Official portrait of United States Supreme Court Justice Ruth Joan Bader Ginsburg. Courtesy Steve Petteway, Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States.
Notorious RBG book cover illustration by Adam Johnson. Courtesy of HarperCollins. Photographs: Crown © by Hurst Photo/Shutterstock; Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States.
Ruth Bader Ginsburg, by Everett Raymond Kinstler, 1996. Oil on canvas. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of Everett Raymond Kinstler. © 1996 Everett Raymond Kinstler.
Ruth Bader as a child, 1935. Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States
The Alpha Epsilon Phi sorority at Cornell University in 1953, featuring Ruth Bader, class of 1954, pictured third from right standing in front of the porch. Published in The Cornellian, 1953. Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections, Cornell University Library.
RBG and Marty with their daughter, Jane, 1958. Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States.
Ruth Bader Ginsburg teaching at Columbia Law School, 1972. Courtesy of Columbia Law School.
Ruth Bader Ginsburg, detail from 1972 Harvard Law School Yearbook. © Harvard Law School Yearbook Association, Courtesy of Harvard Law School Library, Historical and Special Collections.
RBG and Marty taking a break from work, 1972. Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States.
Justice Antonin Scalia and RBG riding an elephant, 1994. Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States.
Courtroom sketch of Justice Ginsburg’s dissent in Shelby County v. Holder, June 25, 2013. Sketch by Art Lien.
Ari Richter, RBG Tattoo II, 2018. Pigmented human skin on glass. Courtesy of the artist.
Roxana Alfer Geffen, Dissent Collar #9, 2016. Courtesy of the artist.
RBG image projected onto New York State Civil Supreme Court building in Manhattan, September 19, 2020. Courtesy Reuters/Andrew Kelly/Alamy Photo.
50th Street subway stop altered in tribute to RBG, 2020. Courtesy Adrian Wilson and Matt Duncan.
Fearless Girl with jabot, 2020. Courtesy Jennifer M. Mason / Shutterstock.com

Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg has been coordinated at New-York Historical by Valerie Paley, senior vice president and Sue Ann Weinberg Director, Patricia D. Klingenstein Library; Laura Mogulescu, curator of women’s history collections; and Anna Danziger Halperin, Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in Women’s History and Public History, Center for Women’s History.

DRIFT, Fragile Future at The Shed, September 29 – December 19, 2021

“Using sound, movement, and film by the multidisciplinary Amsterdam-based artists DRIFT, Fragile Future transforms The Shed’s galleries with experiential multi-sensory installations that suggest alternative solutions for a positive future. Marking DRIFT’s first New York solo presentation and featuring a soundtrack created by ANOHNI, the monumental exhibition and series of special performances builds on DRIFT’s practice of creating experiences that inspire a reconnection to our planet and its natural processes, as well as empathy towards anthropomorphic non-living objects. On view September 29 through December 19, 2021, Fragile Future is presented by Superblue, the ground-breaking new venture dedicated to producing, presenting, and engaging audiences with experiential art, and The Shed, the innovative new arts center on Manhattan’s west side.” — The Shed

Installation views of DRIFT, Fragile Future at The Shed. Photos by Corrado Serra.

DRIFT, Fragile Future, 2007 – 21 
DRIFT, Fragile Future. Coded Coincidence, 2021 
DRIFT, Coded Coincidence
DRIFT, Ego, 2020 – 21
DRIFT, Ego, 2020 – 21
DRIFT, Ego, 2020 – 21
DRIFT, Ego, 2020 – 21 
DRIFT, Drifter performance, 2021. Performed with a soundtrack by ANOHNI.
DRIFT, Drifter performance, 2021. Performed with a soundtrack by ANOHNI.
DRIFT, Drifter performance, 2021. Performed with a soundtrack by ANOHNI.

Organized by Kathleen Forde, Senior Curator, Superblue, the premiere of Fragile Future marks Superblue’s debut presentation in New York, following the launch of its experiential art center in Miami this past May, and coincides with several major projects by DRIFT this fall. This November, a solo exhibition of DRIFT’s “Materialism” series will be presented by Pace Gallery in New York, exploring the raw materials that make up everyday objects.

Jasper Johns: Mind/Mirror at Whitney Museum of American Art, September 29, 2021 – February 13, 2022 

“Jasper Johns (b. 1930) is arguably the most influential living American artist. Over the past sixty-five years, he has produced a radical and varied body of work marked by constant reinvention. In an unprecedented collaboration, the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the Whitney will stage a retrospective of Johns’s career simultaneously across the two museums, featuring paintings, sculptures, drawings, and prints, many shown publicly for the first time. Inspired by the artist’s long-standing fascination with mirroring and doubles, the two halves of the exhibition will act as reflections of one another, spotlighting themes, methods, and images that echo across the two venues. A visit to one museum or the other will provide a vivid chronological survey; a visit to both will offer an innovative and immersive exploration of the many phases, facets, and masterworks of Johns’s still-evolving career.

This exhibition is co-organized by the Whitney Museum of American Art and the Philadelphia Museum of Art. The organizing curators are Carlos Basualdo, Keith L. and Katherine Sachs Senior Curator of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia Museum of Art, and Scott Rothkopf, Senior Deputy Director and Nancy and Steve Crown Family Chief Curator, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, with Sarah B. Vogelman, exhibition assistant, in Philadelphia, and Lauren Young, curatorial assistant, in New York.” — Whitney Museum of American Art

Jasper Johns, Target with Four Faces, 1955. Encaustic and collage on canvas with objects, 29 3/4 × 26 in. (75.6 × 66 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York; gift of Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Scull 8.1958. © 2021 Jasper Johns / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY. Photograph by Jamie Stukenberg, Professional Graphics, Rockford, Illinois
Jasper Johns, Three Flags, 1958. Encaustic on canvas (three panels), 30 7/8 × 45 3/4 in. (78.4 × 116.2 cm) overall. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase, with funds from the Gilman Foundation, Inc., The Lauder Foundation A. Alfred Taubam, Laura-Lee Whittier Woods, Howard Lipman, and Ed Downe in honor of the Museum’s 50th Anniversary 80.32. © 2021 Jasper Johns / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY
Jasper Johns, Map, 1961. Oil on canvas, 78 × 123 1/4 in. (198.1 × 313.1 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York; gift of Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Scull 277.1963. © 2021 Jasper Johns / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY
Jasper Johns, According to What, 1964. Oil, charcoal, and graphite on canvas with objects (six panels), 88 × 191 3/4 in. (223.5 × 487 cm) overall. The Middleton Family Collection. © 2021 Jasper Johns / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY. Philadelphia Museum of Art Photo Studio; Joseph Hu
Jasper Johns, Harlem Light, 1967. Oil and collage on canvas (4 panels), 85 × 172 1/8 in. (215.9 × 437.2 cm) overall. Seattle Art Museum; partial and promised gift of Jon and Mary Shirley, in honor of the 75th Anniversary of the Seattle Art Museum 2002.67 © 2021 Jasper Johns / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photograph courtesy the Wildenstein Plattner Institute, New York
Jasper Johns, Savarin, 1982. Monotype, 50 × 38 in. (127 × 96.5 cm). Bill Goldston, James V. Smith, Thomas Cox/ULAE. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; gift of the American Contemporary Art Foundation, Inc., Leonard A. Lauder, President, 2002.228. Prints published by ULAE © 2021 Jasper Johns and ULAE/VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Jasper Johns, In the Studio, 1982. Encaustic, crayon, and collage on canvas with objects, 72 × 48 in. (182.9 × 121.9 cm). Collection of the artist; on long-term loan to the Philadelphia Museum of Art, 1984. © 2021 Jasper Johns / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photograph © The Wildenstein Plattner Institute, New York, 2021
Jasper Johns, Racing Thoughts, 1983. Encaustic and collage on canvas, 48 1/8 × 75 3/8 in. (122.2 × 191.5 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase, with funds from the Burroughs Wellcome Purchase Fund; Leo Castelli; the Wilfred P. and Rose J. Cohen Purchase Fund; the Julia B. Engel Purchase Fund; the Equitable Life Assurance Society of the United States Purchase Fund; The Sondra and Charles Gilman, Jr. Foundation, Inc.; S. Sidney Kahn; The Lauder Foundation, Leonard and Evelyn Lauder Fund; the Sara Roby Foundation; and the Painting and Sculpture Committee 84.6. © 2021 Jasper Johns / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY. Photograph by Jamie Stukenberg, Professional Graphics, Rockford, Illinois
Jasper Johns, Fall, 1986. Encaustic on canvas, 75 × 50 in. (190.5 × 127 cm). Collection of the artist; on long-term loan to Philadelphia Museum of Art. © 2021 Jasper Johns / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY
Jasper Johns, Untitled, 1998. Encaustic on canvas with objects, 44 1/8 × 22 1/2 in. (112.1 × 57.2 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; promised gift of Emily Fisher Landau P.2010.118. © 2021 Jasper Johns / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY. Photograph by Jamie Stukenberg, Professional Graphics, Rockford, Illinois
Ugo Mulas, Jasper Johns, 1964. Vintage gelatin silver print, 9 7/8 × 14 1/2 in. (25 × 37 cm). Ugo Mulas Archive, Milan. Photograph © Ugo Mulas Heirs

 Adam D. Weinberg, the Whitney’s Alice Pratt Brown Director, commented, “We are delighted to present this unique retrospective together with the Philadelphia Museum of Art, an important occasion for both museums, which have had connections with the artist going back decades. The Whitney has been collecting and showing Johns since the 1960s and we are thrilled to celebrate his extraordinary career. Enigmatic, poetic, rich, and profoundly influential, Johns’s work is always ripe for reexamination.” 

Images courtesy Whitney Museum of American Art.

Another Tradition: Drawings by Black Artists from the American South at The Morgan Library & Museum, September 24, 2021 – January 16, 2022

“In the last three decades, exhibitions and publications have established the rightful place of figures such as Dial and the quilters of Gee’s Bend, Alabama, in the canon of twentieth-century art. The focus has often been on the impressive works of assemblage—whether of found objects or fabric—that have emerged from the Southern United States. Artists only one or two generations removed from slavery, and subjected to the abuses of Jim Crow, developed ingenious formal techniques using found materials and skills learned outside the classroom and studio. Many, like Dial, Rowe, and Holley, exhibited their creations at their homes in elaborate ‘yard shows,’ drawing the attention of passersby and art-world figures alike.  

Another Tradition focuses on the genre of drawing, which, like assemblage, is an art of ‘making do.’ Its accessibility and directness have always appealed to both artists and their audiences. While some works in the exhibition were produced on traditional artist’s papers, others incorporate the unique qualities of found supports. The range of media includes watercolor, ballpoint pen, crayon, and even glitter. But the impact of these works ultimately transcends their innovative means. Although each of the eight artists represented speaks with a distinctive voice, the intimate space of the Morgan’s Thaw Gallery illuminates formal and thematic connections that arise from their shared geographies and experiences.” — The Morgan Library & Museum

Thornton Dial (1928 – 2016). Posing Movie Stars Holding the Freedom Bird, 1991. Watercolor and graphite on wove paper. 30 × 22 in. (76.2 × 55.9 cm). The Morgan Library & Museum, Gift of the Souls Grown Deep Foundation from the William S. Arnett Collection and purchase on the Manley Family Fund, 2018.97r. Photography by Janny Chiu, © Thornton Dial / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.
Thornton Dial (1928 – 2016). Ladies Stand by the Tiger, 1991. Watercolor, graphite, and fabricated black chalk on wove paper. 22 1/2 × 29 7/8 in. (57.2 × 75.9 cm). The Morgan Library & Museum, Gift of the Souls Grown Deep Foundation from the William S. Arnett Collection and purchase on the Manley Family Fund, 2018.98r. Photography by Janny Chiu, © Thornton Dial / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.
Nellie Mae Rowe (1900 – 1982). Untitled, 1978. Porous-point pen on black and white photographic print mounted on wove paper, mounted on plywood, with additions of white paint and oil pastel. 14 1/2 × 14 3/4 in. (36.8 × 37.5 cm). The Morgan Library & Museum, Gift of the Souls Grown Deep Foundation from the William S. Arnett Collection and purchase on the Manley Family Fund, 2018.100r. Photography by Janny Chiu.© 2021 Estate of Nellie Mae Rowe / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.
Nellie Mae Rowe (1900 – 1982). Untitled (Woman Talking to Animals), 1981. Black ballpoint pen, black porous-point pen, wax crayon, water-soluble oil pastel, and graphite on wove paper. 24 × 19 in. (61 × 48.3 cm). The Morgan Library & Museum, Gift of the Souls Grown Deep Foundation from the William S. Arnett Collection and purchase on the Manley Family Fund, 2018.101r. Photography by Janny Chiu. © 2021 Estate of Nellie Mae Rowe / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.
Henry Speller (1903 – 1997). Courthouse, 1986. Wax crayon, porous-point pen, and graphite on wove paper. 18 × 24 in. (45.7 × 61 cm). The Morgan Library & Museum, Gift of the Souls Grown Deep Foundation from the William S. Arnett Collection and purchase on the Manley Family Fund, 2018.102r. Photography by Janny Chiu.
Henry Speller (1903 – 1997). Glorie Jean and Her Friends, 1987. Porous-point pen, wax crayon, and graphite on wove paper. 18 × 24 in. (45.7 × 61 cm). The Morgan Library & Museum, Gift of the Souls Grown Deep Foundation from the William S. Arnett Collection and purchase on the Manley Family Fund, 2018.103r. Photography by Janny Chiu.
Luster Willis (1913 – 1990). Untitled, 1950s. Water-based paint on fabric. 19 1/2 × 17 in. (49.5 × 43.2 cm). The Morgan Library & Museum, Gift of the Souls Grown Deep Foundation from the William S. Arnett Collection and purchase on the Manley Family Fund, 2018.104. Photography by Janny Chiu. © 2021 Estate of Luster Willis / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.
Luster Willis (1913 – 1990). Standing Together, 1986. Tempera paint, glitter, glue, blue ballpoint pen, and graphite pencil on wove paper. 20 × 12 1/4 in. (50.8 × 31.1 cm). The Morgan Library & Museum, Gift of the Souls Grown Deep Foundation from the William S. Arnett Collection and purchase on the Manley Family Fund, 2018.105. Photography by Janny Chiu. © 2021 Estate of Luster Willis / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.
Purvis Young (1943 – 2010). Untitled. 1980s. Ink, watercolor, and crayon on collage of printed papers (recto and verso). 22 × 15 1/2 in. (55.9 × 39.4 cm). The Morgan Library & Museum, Gift of Daniel Aubry, 2017.389. Photography by Janny Chiu. © Larry T. Clemons / Gallery 721 / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.
Purvis Young (1943 – 2010). Sometimes I Get Emotion from the Game, early 1980s. Ballpoint and porous-point pen, on paper glued to found book. 12 1/4 × 17 3/4 in. (31.1 × 45.1 cm). The Morgan Library & Museum, Gift of the Souls Grown Deep Foundation from the William S. Arnett Collection and purchase on the Manley Family Fund, 2018.106. Photgoraphy courtesy of the Souls Grown Deep Foundation. © Larry T. Clemons / Gallery 721 / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

“The acquisition of eleven works from the Souls Grown Deep Foundation in 2018 profoundly enriched our collection of modern and contemporary drawings,” said exhibition curator Rachel Federman, the Morgan’s Associate Curator of Modern and Contemporary Drawings. “Black artists from the South have contributed tremendously to the visual culture of the United States with extraordinary quilts and assemblage sculptures, but also, as this exhibition makes clear, in the realm of drawing.”

Images courtesy The Morgan Library & Museum.

Shigeko Kubota: Liquid Reality at The Museum of Modern Art, through January 1, 2022

“The Museum of Modern Art presents Shigeko Kubota: Liquid Reality, on view from August 21, 2021, through January 1, 2022. Likening video technology to a ‘new paintbrush,’ New York–based Shigeko Kubota (Japanese, 1937– 2015), whose career spanned more than five decades, was one of the first artists to commit to the video medium in the early 1970s. Formally trained as a sculptor, Kubota’s varied accomplishments as an artist, collaborator, curator, and critic helped to shape a pivotal period in the evolution of video as an art form. Shigeko Kubota: Liquid Reality is organized by Erica Papernik-Shimizu, Associate Curator, with the support of Veronika Molnar, Intern, Department of Media and Performance.

MoMA’s presentation takes its name from Kubota’s observation that, ‘[In] video’s reality, infinite variation becomes possible…freedom to dissolve, reconstruct, mutate all forms, shape, color, location, speed, scale…liquid reality.’ Featuring works from MoMA’s collection and key loans from the Shigeko Kubota Video Art Foundation, this exhibition highlights six intrepid video sculptures from a critical decade between 1976 and 1985, during which Kubota pivoted from her sculptural reinterpretations of works by artist Marcel Duchamp to her ‘autobiographical objects.” — MoMA

Shigeko Kubota. Berlin Diary: Thanks to My Ancestors. 1981. Cathode-ray tube monitor, crystal, ink, and twine. 9 × 8 × 11 in. (22.9 × 20.3 × 27.9 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. The Modern Women’s Fund, 2021. © 2021 Estate of Shigeko Kubota / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY. Courtesy Galerie Hubert Winter, Vienna. Digital Image © 2021 The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Photo by Denis Doorly.
Shigeko Kubota. Self-Portrait. ca. 1970- 71. Standard-definition video (color, silent). 5:24 min. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of the Shigeko Kubota Video Art Foundation, 2021. © 2021 Estate of Shigeko Kubota / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY.
Shigeko Kubota. Duchampiana: Nude Descending a Staircase (1976). Standard-definition video and Super 8mm film transferred to video (color, silent; 5:21 min.), four cathode-ray tube monitors, and plywood. 66 1/4 × 30 15/16 × 67 in. (168.3 × 78.6 × 170.2 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Margot and John Ernst, Agnes Gund, and Barbara Pine, 1981. Artwork © 2021 Estate of Shigeko Kubota / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY. Digital image © 2021 The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Photo by Denis Doorly.
Installation view of Shigeko Kubota: Liquid Reality, August 21, 2021–January 1, 2022 at The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Digital Image © 2021 The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Photo by Denis Doorly.
Shigeko Kubota. Three Mountains. 1976–79. Four-channel standard-definition video (color, sound; approx. 30 min. each), seven cathode-ray tube monitors, plywood, and mirrors, overall dimensions variable. Courtesy Shigeko Kubota Video Art Foundation. Artwork © 2021 Estate of Shigeko Kubota/Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY. Digital image © 2021 The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Photo by Denis Doorly.
Installation view of Shigeko Kubota: Liquid Reality, August 21, 2021–January 1, 2022 at The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Digital Image © 2021 The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Photo by Denis Doorly.
Installation view of Shigeko Kubota: Liquid Reality, August 21, 2021–January 1, 2022 at The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Digital Image © 2021 The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Photo by Denis Doorly.
Shigeko Kubota. Detail of Niagara Falls I. 1985. Four-channel video (color, sound; 30:55 min.), ten cathode-ray tube monitors, plastic mirrors, plywood, water, and sprinkler system, 8 ft. × 54 in. × 8 ft. (243.8 × 137.2 × 243.8 cm). Courtesy Shigeko Kubota Video Art Foundation. © 2021 Estate of Shigeko Kubota / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY. Digital image © 2021 The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Photo by Denis Doorly.
Shigeko Kubota. Video Haiku–Hanging Piece. 1981. Cathode-ray tube monitor, closed-circuit video camera, mirror, and plywood. Overall dimensions variable, mirror: 40 × 42 in. (101.6 × 106.7 cm). Courtesy Shigeko Kubota Video Art Foundation. Artwork © 2021 Estate of Shigeko Kubota / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY. Digital image © 2021 The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Photo by Denis Doorly.
Shigeko Kubota. Detail of River. 1979-81. Three-channel standard-definition video (color, silent; approx. 32 min.), three cathode-ray tube monitors, stainless steel, plastic mirrors, water, and wave machine. Overall dimensions variable, basin: 22 × 9 × 4 ft. (670.6 × 274.3 × 121.9 cm). Courtesy Shigeko Kubota Video Art Foundation. Artwork © 2021 Estate of Shigeko Kubota / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY. Digital image © 2021 The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Photo by Denis Doorly.

Associate Curator Erica Papernik-Shimizu explains, “Kubota’s ‘liquid reality’ positions video as both a total liberation from precedent and a way of life. Her visionary sculptures, through poetic contradictions and an economy of means, masterfully combine a bold interrogation of her own identity with prescient investigations of technology itself.”

Images courtesy The Museum of Modern Art.