Gianna Scoino: Rebels at Istituto Italiano di Cultura, Barcelona, April 26 – May 26, 2017

The Italian Cultural Institute of Barcelona remembers the recent loss of artist Gianna Scoino with an exhibition of female faces. The faces, of beloved or famous women, are representations of women’s inner and outer disguises and dramas, each witnessing the complexity and richness of the female universe.

Gianna Scoino was an Italian artist who lived and worked in Florence, and exhibited worldwide. Her continued exploration of materials and unusual textures is reflected in her use of papers and fabrics. On September 30, 2014, L’ Accademia delle Arti del Disegno of Florence nominated her Accademica (Academician). She was the first woman artist to be bestowed this honor since Artemisia Gentileschi in the 1600’s.

Sepideh, 2013

Sepideh, 2013

Inside, 2015

Inside, 2015

Inside, 2015

Inside, 2015

Inside, 2016

Inside, 2016

Rebels, 2016

Rebels, 2016

Color Proof, 2016

Color Proof, 2016

Color Proof, 2016

Exhibition and catalog curated by her son, Francesco Chiacchio.

Images courtesy Francesco Chiacchio.

Making Space: Women Artists and Postwar Abstraction at The Museum of Modern Art, April 15 – August 13, 2017

“The Museum of Modern Art presents a major exhibition surveying the abstract practices of women artists between the end of World War II and the onset of the Feminist movement in the late 1960s. Making Space: Women Artists and Postwar Abstraction features approximately 100 works in a diverse range of mediums by more than 50 international artists. By bringing these works together, the exhibition spotlights the stunning achievements of women artists during a pivotal period in art history. Drawn entirely from the Museum’s collection, Making Space includes works that were acquired soon after they were made in the 1950s and 1960s, as well as many recent acquisitions—including a suite of photographs (c. 1950) by Gertrudes Altschul (Brazilian, born Germany. 1904–1962), an untitled sculpture (c.1955) by Ruth Asawa (American, 1926-2013), and an untitled work on paper (c.1968) by Alma Woodsey Thomas (American, 1891–1978)—that reflect the Museum’s ongoing efforts to improve its representation of women artists. Nearly half the works are on view at MoMA for the first time.” — MoMA

Installation views of Making Space: Women Artists and Postwar Abstraction. The Museum of Modern Art, New York, April 15-August 13, 2017. © 2017 The Museum of Modern Art. Photos: Jonathan Muzikar.

Making Space is organized by Starr Figura, Curator, Department of Drawings and Prints, and Sarah Meister, Curator, Department of Photography, with Hillary Reder, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints.

Images courtesy The Museum of Modern Art.

CHIHULY at New York Botanical Garden, April 22 – October 29, 2017

“CHIHULY, a major new exhibition at The New York Botanical Garden spotlights world-renowned artist Dale Chihuly’s bold innovation in a variety of media throughout his celebrated career. Chihuly’s first major garden exhibition in New York in more than ten years features more than 20 installations and includes drawings and early works that reveal the evolution and development of his artistic process. Set within NYBG’s landmark landscape and buildings, this exhibition is a must-see throughout the changing seasons.

The Garden’s dramatic vistas become living canvases for work created specifically for NYBG, showcasing Chihuly’s signature organic shapes in brilliant colors. Among the singular sights is a monumental reimagination of his storied 1975 installation at upstate New York’s Artpark: three new works—Koda studies—enliven the water features of the Native Plant Garden and the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory Courtyard’s Tropical Pool, reflecting the interplay and movement of color and light.” — NYBG

Dale Chihuly, Fire Orange Baskets, 2017, The New York Botanical Garden

Dale Chihuly, Palazzo Ducale Tower, 2017, The New York Botanical Garden

Dale Chihuly, Seaforms, 2017, The New York Botanical Garden

Dale Chihuly, Macchia Forest, 2017, The New York Botanical Garden

Dale Chihuly, White Tower with Fiori, 2017, The New York Botanical Garden

Dale Chihuly, Red Reeds on Logs, 2017, The New York Botanical Garden

Dale Chihuly, Sapphire Star, 2017, The New York Botanical Garden

Dale Chihuly, Neon 206, 2017, The New York Botanical Garden, Photo: Ben Hider

“The New York Botanical Garden is the perfect setting for Dale Chihuly’s art,” said Gregory Long, Chief Executive Officer and The William C. Steere Sr. President of NYBG. “Our historic landscape is an open-air museum, providing a thrilling opportunity for our visitors to see the spectacular installations, especially when they will be lit at night. The exhibition will be a more holistic look at the legacy of Chihuly the artist. We are extremely grateful to our sponsors and everyone whose support is making it possible for us to bring this experience to our existing and new audiences.”

Images courtesy New York Botanical Garden.

Larry Sultan: Here and Home at San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, April 15 – July 23, 2017

Larry Sultan: Here and Home is the first retrospective to examine the work and career of California photographer Larry Sultan (1946–2009). It explores Sultan’s 35-year career, from his early collaborative projects of the 1970s to his own documentary-style photographs. These solo projects explore themes of home and family, as well as the construction of identity, façade and storytelling. Frequently photographing domestic life and suburban settings, Sultan examines reality, fantasy, longing and displacement throughout his work.

“As an artist, Larry Sultan was one of the great thinkers of photography in all of its facets,” said Clément Chéroux, senior curator of photography at SFMOMA. “He had the unique power and insight to transform certain forms of functional photography into art.”

“Sultan’s work is a key part of the SFMOMA collection of photography made in California,” said Sandra S. Phillips, exhibition curator and curator emerita of photography at SFMOMA. “In light of Sultan’s more than 30-year teaching career in the Bay Area, and his close relationship with SFMOMA, Sultan’s work will truly be coming home as the touring exhibition Here and Home concludes in San Francisco.”

Larry Sultan and Mike Mandel, Untitled, from the series Evidence, 1977, printed 2013; gelatin silver print; © Estate of Larry Sultan and Mike Mandel; photo: courtesy the Estate of Larry Sultan

Larry Sultan and Mike Mandel, Untitled, from the series Evidence, 1977, printed 2013; gelatin silver print; © Estate of Larry Sultan and Mike Mandel; photo: courtesy the Estate of Larry Sultan

Larry Sultan and Mike Mandel, Oranges on Fire, 1975; photo mural; © Estate of Larry Sultan and Mike Mandel; photo: courtesy the Estate of Larry Sultan

Larry Sultan, Untitled, from the series Swimmers, 1978–82; chromogenic print; © Estate of Larry Sultan; photo: courtesy the Estate of Larry Sultan

Larry Sultan, Practicing Golf Swing, from the series Pictures from Home, 1986; chromogenic print; © Estate of Larry Sultan; photo: courtesy the Estate of Larry Sultan

Larry Sultan, Business Page, from the series Pictures From Home, 1985; chromogenic print; © Estate of Larry Sultan; photo: courtesy the Estate of Larry Sultan

Larry Sultan, My Mother Posing for Me, from the series Pictures From Home, 1984; chromogenic print; © Estate of Larry Sultan; photo: courtesy the Estate of Larry Sultan

Larry Sultan, Discussion, Kitchen Table, from the series Pictures From Home, 1985; chromogenic print; © Estate of Larry Sultan; photo: courtesy the Estate of Larry Sultan

Larry Sultan, Dad with Golf Clubs, from the series Pictures From Home, 1987; chromogenic print; © Estate of Larry Sultan; photo: courtesy the Estate of Larry Sultan

Larry Sultan, Mom on Chaise Lounge, from the series, Pictures from Home, 1987; chromogenic print; © Estate of Larry Sultan; photo: courtesy the Estate of Larry Sultan

Larry Sultan, Sunset, from the series, Pictures from Home, 1989; chromogenic print; © Estate of Larry Sultan; photo: courtesy the Estate of Larry Sultan

Larry Sultan, Boxers, Mission Hills, from the series The Valley, 1999; chromogenic print; © Estate of Larry Sultan; photo: courtesy the Estate of Larry Sultan

Larry Sultan, Sharon Wild, from the series The Valley, 2001; chromogenic print; © Estate of Larry Sultan; photo: courtesy the Estate of Larry Sultan

Larry Sultan, Woman in Curlers, from the series The Valley, 2002; chromogenic print; © Estate of Larry Sultan; photo: courtesy the Estate of Larry Sultan

Larry Sultan, Canal District, San Rafael, from the series Homeland, 2006; chromogenic print; promised gift of Robert Mailer Anderson and Nicola Miner to the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; © Estate of Larry Sultan; photo: courtesy the Estate of Larry Sultan

Larry Sultan, Batting Cage, from the series Homeland, 2007; chromogenic print; promised gift of Michal Venera to the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; © Estate of Larry Sultan; photo: courtesy the Estate of Larry Sultan

Larry Sultan, Backyard Hercules, from the series Homeland, 2009; chromogenic print; promised gift of Nion McEvoy to the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; © Estate of Larry Sultan; photo: courtesy the Estate of Larry Sultan

Images courtesy San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

The Roof Garden Commission: Adrián Villar Rojas, The Theatre of Disappearance at The Met Fifth Avenue, April 14 – October 29, 2017

Photographs by Corrado Serra.

Artist’s Statement 

The Met’s history as an institution is a testimony to America’s path as a nation. Its doors opened in 1870 with a large collection of plaster casts of sculptural masterpieces. By the mid-twentieth century, genuine artifacts had displaced the copies. Departments quickly emerged, dividing the cultural endowment into regions and ages, turning a space-time labyrinth into a welcoming, light-filled house for visitors.

The Theater of Disappearance seeks to dialogue with the vision and division of The Met’s patrimony. An entire cartography of human culture seems to emerge from the Museum’s wings and rooms. Rather than a mirror of facts, the Museum becomes a version of them: America’s map of human activity on earth, a scale-model account of who we are and how we got here.

What if we discovered that we are in a labyrinth, not a house? What if every classification and hierarchy created to stabilize the world was erased to produce a deeper insight: that there are no facts but only interpretations, and that the distance between interpretations and facts might be power—the power of an institution or a nation to sanction truth?

Jorge Luis Borges imagined a kingdom so obsessed with cartography that a full-scale map of the kingdom itself was made. When the map’s futility plunged it into disuse, torn pieces, like phantoms, hung from trees and rolled through the windy desert. What if The Met was neither the map nor even its pieces, but instead that windy desert, a scale-model theater of disappearance? — Adrián Villar Rojas

The Roof Garden Commission: Adrián Villar Rojas, The Theater of Disappearance was conceived by Sheena Wagstaff, Leonard A. Lauder Chairman of Modern and Contemporary Art, and curated by Beatrice Galilee, Daniel Brodsky Associate Curator of Architecture and Design, both of The Met’s Department of Modern and Contemporary Art, in consultation with the artist. It is the fifth in a series of site-specific commissions for the outdoor space.

Bill Viola: The Moving Portrait at the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery, through May 7, 2017

“‘Bill Viola: The Moving Portrait’—the National Portrait Gallery’s first exhibition entirely devoted to media art—offers a new interpretation of the work of the pioneering video artist as a career-long experimentation with portraiture. Since the early 1970s, Viola has been recognized for his groundbreaking and masterful use of video technologies, creating poetic works that explore the spiritual and perceptual side of human experience and search for a deeper understanding of the world around us. Although Viola’s work has been the subject of numerous surveys, it has not been considered in terms of its sustained engagement with—indeed, reshaping of—the genre of portraiture. As the works in this exhibition reveal, Viola’s technological investigations rely on the language of the face and body, encouraging self-reflection as well as expressing the universality of our experiences and articulating metaphysical issues about our place in the world. No other artist has pressed us to confront these questions in such elegant, humanistic terms. ‘Bill Viola: The Moving Portrait’ not only sheds light on forty years of artistry but also the ways that portraiture extends beyond likeness. Ultimately, it opens our eyes to the manner in which emerging technologies draw out our perpetual impulses toward self-representation and collective contemplation.” — National Portrait Gallery

Incrementation, 1996. Video/sound installation © Bill Viola. Photo: Mike Bruce, courtesy Anthony d’Offay, London

Nine Attempts to Achieve Immortality, 1996. Video/sound installation © Bill Viola. Photo: Mike Bruce, courtesy Anthony d’Offay, London

Dolorosa, 2000. Video diptych © Bill Viola. Photo: The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles

Catherine’s Room, 2001. Video polyptych.  Photo: Kira Perov © Bill Viola

The Raft, May 2004. Video/sound installation. Photo: Kira Perov © Bill Viola

The Raft, May 2004. Video/sound installation. Photo: Kira Perov © Bill Viola

The Raft, May 2004. Video/sound installation. Photo: Kira Perov © Bill Viola

The Raft, May 2004. Video/sound installation. Photo: Kira Perov © Bill Viola

Three Women, 2008. Video on plasma display. Photo: Kira Perov © Bill Viola

Three Women, 2008. Video on plasma display. Photo: Kira Perov © Bill Viola

Three Women, 2008. Video on plasma display. Photo: Kira Perov © Bill Viola

The Dreamers, 2013. Video/sound installation. Lent by Keith D. Stoltz © Bill Viola. Photo: Peter Mallet, courtesy Blain|Southern, London

“Bill Viola: The Moving Portrait” has been curated by Asma Naeem, curator of prints, drawings and media art at the National Portrait Gallery, in consultation with Viola’s creative partner, Kira Perov, and Bill Viola Studio.

Images courtesy National Portrait Gallery.

The Jazz Age: American Style in the 1920s at Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, September 30, 2017 – January 14, 2018

The Jazz Age: American Style in the 1920s is the first major museum exhibition to focus on American taste in design during the exhilarating years of the 1920s. The exhibition examines a broad spectrum of design showing the multidimensional aspect of American style in this decade. Through 400 works drawn from both public and private collections, the exhibition explores all aspects of design from day to night: architecture, interior design, decorative art, jewelry and fashion, music and film.

“Exploring the significant impact of European influences, the explosive growth of American cities, avant-garde artistic movements, new social mores and the role of technology, ‘The Jazz Age’ will seek to define the American spirit of the period,” said Cooper Hewitt Director Caroline Baumann. “Through an innovative interpretive presentation on the third-floor Barbara and Morton Mandel Design Gallery and a portion of the second floor, the exhibition will delight the eye, draw connections across media and present a new narrative for art and design in this vibrant era.”

Five-Piece Coffee and Tea Service, 1929. Gebelein Silversmiths (American, Boston, 1908-1960). George Christian Gebelein (American, b. Germany, 1878-1945), designer. Silver, ebonized wood; tea kettle on stand with burner: h. 31.9 (overall); coffee pot: h. 25.2; teapot: h. 22.3 cm; covered sugar bowl: h. 21 cm; creamer: h. 16 cm. Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Anonymous Gift, 1986.778a-c. Photo: © 2017 Museum of Fine Arts Boston.

Actaeon, 1925. Paul Manship (American, 1885-1966). Bronze; 121.2 x 128.7 x 31.7 cm. David Owsley Museum of Art, Frank C. Ball Collection, gift of the Ball Brothers Foundation, 1995.035.164.

Egyptian Bracelet, ca. 1925; Produced by Lacloche Frères (Paris, France); Diamonds, turquoise, sapphires, mother-of-pearl, onyx, black pearls, smoky quartz, tourmaline, gold, platinum; 17.9 x 4 cm (7 1/16 x 1 9/16 in.); Private Collection; Photo: Matt Flynn © Smithsonian Institution

Mystery Clock with Single Axle, ca. 1921; Produced by Cartier (Paris, France); Owned by Anna (Mrs. Horace) Dodge (American, 1869–1970). Gold, platinum, ebonite, citrine, diamonds, enamel; 12.9 x 9.7 x 4.8 cm (5 1/16 × 3 13/16 × 1 7/8 in.); Cartier Collection, Inv. CM 29 C21; Photo: Marian Gerard, Cartier Collection © Cartier

Purse, c. 1920-30. Van Cleef & Arpels (French, Paris, est. 1896). Gold, enamel, diamonds, sapphires, silk, cotton; 21.2 x 16 x 2.5 cm. The Cleveland Museum of Art, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Lee Lyon, 2009.378.

Drawing, Textile Design: Party Ashtray, 1930-31; Designed by Donald Deskey (American, 1894-1989); White, blue, and orange pastel on black wove paper; 16 x 13.1 cm (6 5/16 x 5 3/16 in.); Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, Gift of Donald Deskey, 1975-11-20; Photo: Matt Flynn © Smithsonian Institution

Delphos dress and jacket with box, 1939; Designed by Mariano Fortuny (Spanish, active Italy 1871-1949); Manufactured by Societa Anonima Fortuny (Venice, Italy); Dress: pleated silk; Jacket: stencil-printed silk velvet; Dress: 162.6 x 35.6 cm (5 ft. 4 in. x 14 in.); Jacket: 91.4 x 86.4 cm (36 x 34 in.) Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, Museum purchase from the Members’ Acquisitions Fund of Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum, 2016-28-1-a,b; Photo: Matt Flynn © Smithsonian Institution

Doors for the Music Room of Mr. and Mrs. Solomon R. Guggenheim, 1925-26; Designed by Seraphin Soudbinine (French, b. Russia 1870-1944); Executed by Jean Dunand (French, b. Switzerland, 1877-1942); Made in Paris, France; Carved, joined, and lacquered wood, eggshell, mother-of-pearl, gold leaf, cast bronze; 271.2 x 65.9 x 7.6 cm (8 ft. 10 3/4 in. x 25 15/16 in. x 3 in.); Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum; Gift of Mrs. Solomon R. Guggenheim, 1950-104-1/4; Photo: Matt Flynn © Smithsonian Institution

Dressing Table and Bench, ca. 1929; After Lèon Jallot (French, 1874-1967); Retailed by Lord & Taylor (New York, New York, USA); Lacquered joined wood, mirrored glass, metal; Dressing table: 79.3 x 105.4 x 60.3 cm (31 1/4 x 41 1/2 x 23 3/4 in.); Bench: 49.5 x 54.8 x 31.5 cm (19 1/2 x 21 9/16 x 12 3/8 in.); Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum; Gift of James M. Osborn, 1969-97-7-a/I; Photo: Matt Flynn © Smithsonian Institution

Sky-scraper Tea Service, 1928; Designed by Louis W. Rice (American, b. Germany 1872-1933); Produced by Apollo Studios (New York, New York, USA); Silver-plated brass; Teapot: 16.5 x 15.6 x 11.7 cm (6 1/2 x 6 1/8 x 4 5/8 in.); Sugar bowl: 11.5 x 13 x 8 cm (4 1/2 x 5 1/8 x 3 1/8 in.); Creamer: 12 x 13 x 6.7 cm (4 3/4 x 5 1/8 x 2 5/8 in.); Tray: 11.5 x 37 x 28.3 cm (4 1/2 x 14 9/16 x 11 1/8 in.); Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum; Promised gift of George R. Kravis II; Photo: Matt Flynn © Smithsonian Institution

Screen, ca. 1928; Designed by Donald Deskey (American, 1894-1989); Silver leaf, lacquered wood, cast metal (hinges); Right Panel: 198.1 x 46.4 cm (6 ft. 6 in. x 18 1/4 in.); Center Panel: 168.3 x 61 cm (5 ft. 6 1/4 in. x 24 in.); Left Panel: 153 x 46.4 cm (60 1/4 x 18 1/4 in.); Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum; Promised gift of George R. Kravis II; Photo: Matt Flynn © Smithsonian Institution

“The New Yorker” (Jazz) Punch Bowl, 1931; Designed by Viktor Schreckengost (American, 1906–2008); Manufactured by Cowan Pottery Studio (Rocky River, Ohio, USA); Glazed, molded earthenware; 29.9 x 42.2 cm (11 3/4 x 16 5/8 in.); Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, Gift of Mrs. Homer Kripke, 1980-21-7; Photo: © Smithsonian Institution

Drawing, Study for Maximum Mass Permitted by the 1916 New York Zoning Law, Stage 4, 1922; Designed by Hugh Ferriss (American, 1889-1962); Black crayon, stumped, pen and black ink, brush and black wash, varnish on illustration board; 66.8 x 51 cm (26 5/16 x 20 1/16 in.); Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum; Gift of Mrs. Hugh Ferriss, 1969-137-4; Photo: Matt Flynn © Smithsonian Institution

Skyscraper Bookcase Desk, c. 1928. Paul T. Frankl (American, b. Austria, 1886-1958). California redwood, black lacquer; 219.7 x 163.8 x 85.1 cm. Grand Rapids Art Museum, Gift of Dr. and Mrs. John Halick, 1984.7.2.

Muse with Violin Screen (detail), 1930. Rose Iron Works, Inc. (American, Cleveland, est. 1904). Paul Fehér (Hungarian, 1898-1990), designer. Wrought iron, brass; silver and gold plating; 156.2 x 156.2 cm. The Cleveland Museum of Art, On Loan from the Rose Iron Works Collections, LLC, 352.1996. © Rose Iron Works Collections, LLC. Photo: Howard Agriesti

Brooklyn Bridge, 1919-20; Joseph Stella (American, b. Italy 1877-1946); Oil on canvas; 215.3 x 194.6 cm (84 3/4 x 76 5/8 in.); Yale University Art Gallery, Gift of Collection Société Anonyme; Photo: Yale University Art Gallery

Tourbillons Vase, 1926; Designed by Suzanne Lalique (French, 1892–1989); For René Lalique (French, 1860–1945); Pressed, carved, acid-etched and enameled glass; 20.1 x 17.5 cm (7 15/16 x 6 7/8 in.); Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum; Museum purchase through gift of Anonymous Donor, 1969-20-1; Photo: © Smithsonian Institution

Poster, ITF Internationale tentoonstelling op filmgebied (International Film Exhibition), 1928; Designed by Piet Zwart (Dutch, 1885-1977); Letterpress on wove paper; 85 x 61 cm (33 7/16 in. x 24 in.); Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum; Museum purchase through gift of Susan Hermanos, Judith and Charles Bergoffen, Cathy Nierras, and Anonymous Donors and from Drawings and Prints Council and General Acquisitions Endowment Funds, 2013-20-1; Photo: Matt Flynn © Smithsonian Institution

Textile, Tissu Simultané no. 46 (Simultaneous Fabric no. 46), 1924; Designed by Sonia Delaunay (French b. Russia, 1885-1979); Printed silk; 46.5 x 65 cm (18 5/16 x 25 9/16 in.); Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum; Museum purchase through gift of Friedman Benda, Elaine Lustig Cohen, Ruth Kaufmann, Patricia Orlofsky and from General Acquisitions Endowment Fund, 2012-2-1; Photo: © Smithsonian Institution

AD-65 Radio, designed 1932, manufactured 1934; Designed by Wells Wintemute Coates (Canadian, 1895-1958); Manufactured by E.K. Cole, Ltd. (England); Compression molded Bakelite, chromium-plated metal, woven textile; 38.1 x 35.6 cm (15 x 14 in.); Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum; Promised gift of George R. Kravis II; Photo: Matt Flynn © Smithsonian Institution

Daybed, 1933-1935; Designed by Frederick Kiesler (American, b. Austro-Hungarian Empire 1890-1965); Birch-faced plywood, tulip poplar, nickel-plated steel; 96.5 x 116.8 x 127 cm (38 x 46 x 50 in.); Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum; Gift of Virginia Bayer, 2014-27-1-a/e; Photo: Matt Flynn © Smithsonian Institution

The exhibition is  organized by Sarah Coffin, curator and head of product design and decorative arts at Cooper Hewitt and Stephen Harrison, curator of decorative art and design at the Cleveland Museum of Art.

Images courtesy Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum.

Jeweled Splendors of the Art Deco Era: The Prince and Princess Sadruddin Aga Khan Collection at Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, April 7 – August 27, 2017

Jeweled Splendors of the Art Deco Era: The Prince and Princess Sadruddin Aga Khan Collection features more than 100 extraordinary examples of luxury cigarette and vanity cases, compacts, clocks and other objects. The collection, personal gifts from Prince Sadruddin Aga Khan (1933–2003) to his wife, Catherine (b. 1938), was amassed over three decades and displays the excitement, innovation and creativity of the Art Deco era at its most luxurious. It includes exquisite work from the premier jewelry houses of Europe and America—among them Cartier, Van Cleef & Arpels, Lacloche Frères, Boucheron and Bulgari—dating from 1910 to 1938.

“A collection with a rich and storied history, these magnificent works represent the foremost craftsmanship of their era,” said Cooper Hewitt Director Caroline Baumann. “With exotic motifs exquisitely formed with the finest jewels, metals and precious stones, these boxes, timepieces and jewelry also are virtuosic demonstrations of artistic expressivity and mastery of ancient techniques. Concurrently on view in association with ‘The Jazz Age: American Style in the 1920s,’ this exhibition offers an unprecedented opportunity to see these objects in the context of the dramatic societal and technological changes impacting the world during this pivotal moment in early modern history.”

Rabbit Vanity Case, ca. 1924; Produced by Cartier (Paris, France); Gold, seed pearls, diamonds, sapphires, enamel, ruby, sapphire, pencil, mount of 18-karat gold; 10.4 x 5 x 1.7 cm (4 1/8 x 2 x 11/16 in.); Photo: Doug Rosa

Imperial Door Vanity Case, ca. 1924; Produced by Lacloche Frères (Paris, France); Manufactured by Strauss, Allard & Meyer (France); Lacquer, carved onyx, coral, diamonds, mirrored plate glass, gold, platinum; 8.3 x 4.8 x 1.7 cm (3 1/4 x 1 7/8 x 11/16 in.); Photo: Doug Rosa

Zen Garden Vanity Case, ca. 1925; Produced by Linzeler & Marchak (France); Manufactured by Strauss, Allard & Meyer (France); Mosaic by Vladimir Makovsky (Russian, active Paris, 1884-1966); Enamel, hardstone, mother-of-pearl, diamonds, gold, platinum, mirrored plate glass; 9.5 x 5.3 x 1.2 cm (3 3/4 x 2 1/16 x 1/2 in.); Photo: Doug Rosa

Panther Vanity Case, 1925; Produced by Cartier (Paris, France); Rubies, mother-of-pearl, turquoise, onyx, diamonds, gold, platinum; 10.2 x 4.4 x 1.8 cm (4 in. x 1 3/4 in. x 11/16 in.); Photo: Doug Rosa.

Fern Compact (France), ca. 1929; Enamel, rose-cut diamonds, mirrored plate glass, gold, platinum; 8.2 x 5.4 x 1.3 cm (3 1/4 x 2 1/8 x 1/2 in.); Photo: Doug Rosa

Cypress Tree Vanity Case, 1928; Produced by Van Cleef & Arpels (Paris, France); Manufactured by Alfred Langlois (France); Gold, enamel, diamonds, onyx, platinum, mirrored plate glass; 8.7 x 5 x 1.1 cm (3 7/16 x 1 15/16 x 7/16 in.); Photo: Doug Rosa

Persian Mosque Vanity Case, ca. 1929; Produced by Black, Starr & Frost (New York, New York, USA); Plaque made by Vladimir Makovsky (Russian, active Paris, 1884-1966); Mother-of-pearl, hardstone, enamel, gold, diamonds, platinum; L x W x D: 8.2 x 5.8 x 1.8 cm (3 1/4 x 2 5/16 x 11/16 in.); Photo: Doug Rosa

Noble Hunt Vanity Case, ca. 1930; Produced by Lacloche Frères (Paris, France); Mother-of-pearl, carved hardstone, enamel, diamonds, mount of platinum and gold; 9 x 4.7 x 1.3 cm (3 9/16 x 1 7/8 x 1/2 in.); Photo: Doug Rosa

Noble Hunt Vanity and Cigarette Case, 1930; Produced by Van Cleef & Arpels (Paris, France); Mother-of-pearl, hardstone, gold, rose-cut diamonds, enamel, mount of gold; 8.8 x 5.6 x 2 cm (3 7/16 x 2 3/16 x 13/16 in.); Photo: Doug Rosa

Striped Agate Cigarette or Card Box (probably France), ca. 1919; Carved, striated agate, rose-cut diamonds in platinum settings; 8.6 x 5.5 x 1.7 cm, 3 1/4 x 2 1/8 x 5/16 inches; Photo: Doug Rosa

Box, ca 1927; Produced by Cartier (Paris, France); Gold mounted with lacque burgauté panels, carve coral, black enamel, cabochon emeralds, fluted-carved nephrite, mirrored plate glass (interior); 8.7 x 5.9 x 2.5 cm (3 7/16 in. x 2 5/16 in. x 1 in.); Photo: Doug Rosa

Vanity Case, ca. 1927; Produced by Cartier (Paris, France); Manufactured by Henri Lavabre (French); Lapis lazuli, carved jade, carved ruyi, coral, diamonds, lacquer, mirrored plate glass, gold, platinum; 9.9 x 5.2 x 1.7 cm (3 7/8 x 2 1/16 x 11/16 in.); Photo: Doug Rosa

Box, 1928; Produced by Van Cleef & Arpels (Paris, France); Manufactured by Strauss, Allard & Meyer (France); Lapis lazuli, diamonds, frosted rock crystal, jadeite, white gold; 6 x 7.6 x 1.6 cm (2 3/8 in. x 3 in. x 5/8 in.); Photo: Doug Rosa

Chrysanthemum Vanity Case, ca. 1928; Produced by Lacloche Frères (Paris, France); Manufactured by Strauss, Allard & Meyer (France); Ruby, amethyst, sapphire, onyx, diamonds, emeralds, enamel, white gold; L x W x D: 7.5 x 4.4 x 1.6 cm (2 15/16 x 1 3/4 x 5/8 in.); Photo: Doug Rosa

Retrograde Clock, 1927; Produced by Verger Frères (Paris, France); Movement manufactured by Vacheron Constantin (Geneva, Switzerland); Black onyx, rock crystal, diamond; 16.5 x 11 x 5 cm (6 1/2 x 4 5/16 x 1 15/16 in.); Photo: Doug Rosa

Imperial Guardian Lion Mystery Clock, 1929; Produced by Maurice Couet (French, 1885-1963) for Cartier (Paris, France); Carved nephrite, enamel, gold, cabochon emeralds, cabochon rubies, carved citrine, rose-cut diamonds, carved coral, pearls, platinum; 17 x 9.3 x 16.2 cm (6 11/16 x 3 11/16 x 6 3/8 in.); Photo: Doug Rosa

The accompanying 256-page publication published by Thames & Hudson features essays by Sarah D. Coffin, curator and head of product design and decorative arts at Cooper Hewitt; Stephen Harrison, curator of decorative art and design at the Cleveland Museum of Art; and Evelyne Possémé, chief curator, Musée des Arts décoratifs, Paris.

Images courtesy Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum.

Outcasts: Women in the Wilderness at Glyndor Gallery, Wave Hill, through July 9, 2017 and Wave Hill Sunroom Project Space Installation by Borinquen Gallo, through May 21, 2017

Photographs by Corrado Serra.

“Women have long been treated and portrayed as outcasts, pushed to the fringes of societal order. Throughout the world, women are encouraged to remain silent and obedient or suffer terrible consequences. Combating imposed and constricted perceptions of gender, artists in Outcasts imagine and embody a plethora of empowered identities for women. These voices of resilience are welcome in this divisive time.

Nancy Spero’s prolific oeuvre is the impetus for Outcasts: Women in the Wilderness. She boldly focused on the female figure as protagonist, recreating a mix of multiple historical narratives, ancient mythologies and contemporary events. Three themes that emerge from her work are explored in Outcasts: finding a voice, to express multiple perspectives on female identity; harnessing ancient and modern mythologies to subvert the established social and cultural order; and healing and empowerment of the individual and the community.

Frequently referred to as an oasis, Wave Hill offers refuge—protection or shelter from danger or hardship—and sanctuary—a space conductive to contemplation. In a time of political and social disruption, this place is a haven from tumult.” — Introductory Wall Text

Left:  Yee I-Lann , Imagining Pontianak: I’ve Got Sunshine on a Cloudy Day, 2016. Center: Samira Abbasy: Department of Nuclear Medicine — EKG, 2014, Death Mask, 2017, Weeping Wall – (How Do I Look?), 2017

Right: Chitra Ganesh, Untitled, 2017

Left: Chitra Ganesh, Untitled, 2017. Right: Scherezade Garcia, Yemaya II and Yemaya I, 2016

Scherezade Garcia, Left: Yemaya II; Right: Yemaya I, 2016

Marie Watt. Left to right: Companion Species, 2017; Generous Ones (Pink Sky), 2014, Ledger: Predator and Prey, 2015; Skywalker/Skyscraper (Twins), 2014

Left: Fay Ku, Dogwood, 2015 and Third Times the Charm, (or Three Eves), 2016. Right: Nancy Spero, La Folie III, 2002 and Masha Bruskina/Vulture Goddess, 1996

Nancy Spero. Left to right: La Folie III, 2002; Masha Bruskina/Vulture Goddess, 1996; Cumulus, 2000

Installation view of South Gallery

Jaishri Abichandani, Before Kali 70, 2014

Left: Mariam Ghani, photos from the series Landscape Studies: New Mexico. Right: Huma Bhabha, Untitled, 2014

Tracey Moffatt. Top: Night Spirits No. 1 ‘Nunnery in Red, by the Orange Tree in Blue, Desert in Yellow’, 2013. Bottom: Night Spirits No. 2 ‘Over the Bridge in Green, River in Red, Youth in Green’, 2013

Zanele Muholi. Left to right: Thulani I, Paris, 2014; Muholi, Muholi, Amsterdam, 2014

Installation view of South Gallery

Kris Grey. Left to right: Fireplace from Procession series, 2017, Kris Grey under his video, Greenhouse from Procession series, 2017

Wave Hill Sunroom Project Space, through May 21, 2017. Borinquen Gallo, Be(e) Sanctuary, 2017

Borinquen Gallo, Be(e) Sanctuary, 2017

Borinquen Gallo, Be(e) Sanctuary, 2017

Borinquen Gallo, Be(e) Sanctuary, 2017

Borinquen Gallo, Be(e) Sanctuary, 2017

Outcasts: Women in the Wilderness is organized by guest curators Deborah Frizzell and Harry J. Weil, and by Wave Hill Senior Curator Jennifer McGregor and Curator of Visual Arts Gabriel de Guzman. Sunroom Project Space is organized by Gabriel de Guzman, Curator of Visual Arts.

Kay Rosen: H Is for House at The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, through September 4, 2017

“It is often assumed that letterforms and printed words are neutral, graphic symbols that are merely vehicles for meaning. Like the relationship between fish and the ocean, we are generally oblivious to any content that might be present in the alphabet, skimming over words and sentences without giving a second thought to the meaning that perhaps lurks within. For artist Kay Rosen, this invisibility of content in letterforms and texts is the primary subject matter of a career that has now spanned four decades. Rosen’s interest in text is predicated upon her early study of linguistics and its focus on the analysis of the structure of language; but it is the visual nature of written language—a blind spot in traditional linguistics—that captivated her attention and paved the way for her practice as an artist. H Is for House, the title of both the exhibition and a large, two-part wall painting, points to Rosen’s chosen raw material, the alphabet, and the architectural nature of the works included.

All of the works on paper in the exhibition are of a vertical format and are rendered in black and white, which is unusual for the artist. Rosen’s horizontal, colored works are more like paintings and often relate to signage (the artist has frequently made billboards), but these works do not read as paintings or signs, but as physical constructions: letters and words used as building blocks, stacked and aligned, with both form and content frequently relating to gravity. However, the vertical compositions have another, deeper, level of content; two-dimensional works with a vertical format are traditionally referred to as portrait, as they relate to the figure, and Rosen’s vertical works exhibit strong figurative connotations that reveal her surprising interest in dance. Parallels can be found between Rosen’s work and the vernacular, repetitive structure in the work of post-modern dancers such as Trisha Brown and Lucinda Childs, both of whom are cited by the artist as influences. Rather than resorting to extreme artifice, Rosen, in her own words, creates ‘works that are practically self-made since they are created out of their own body parts, with only a little push from me.’

Rosen’s work is set apart from other text-based art by a concern with seeing words as well as reading them. Humor—of a sort—has also played an ongoing role in her work through the literary technique of word play, although not so much through invention as by simply revealing what is hidden in plain sight. Rosen’s humor grows out of the not-so-obvious truths that are found embedded inside words.” —  Introductory Wall Text by Richard Klein, exhibitions director

Caption for all images: Kay Rosen, H Is for House (installation view), 2017. Photo: Tom Powel Imaging. Images courtesy The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum.

Kay Rosen, H Is for House was organized by Richard Klein, exhibitions director, The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum.

Doug Wheeler: PSAD Synthetic Desert III at Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, through August 2, 2017

“The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum presents the first-ever realized work from a group of installations conceived by Doug Wheeler during the late 1960s and ’70s: Doug Wheeler: PSAD Synthetic Desert III. Produced in close collaboration with the artist, the Guggenheim installation is developed from drawings executed in 1968 and will be on view in the museum’s Tower Level 7. In addition to the architectural modification of an existing room to achieve an optical impression of empty space, which is a familiar element in other works by Wheeler, PSAD Synthetic Desert III is also a semi-anaechoic chamber: a space designed to suppress all but the lowest levels of ambient sound. Into this profound silence other sound will then be introduced. The two elements—optical and acoustic—transform the museum gallery into a world apart. Wheeler compares the impact of the work to his own experience in the deserts of northern Arizona, where near-silent conditions deeply influence the visual and felt sensation of space.” — Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

Doug Wheeler in the Painted Desert, Arizona, ca. 1970. Courtesy the artist. © Doug Wheeler

Doug Wheeler. PSAD Synthetic Desert III, 1971. Ink on paper, 61.1 x 91.4 cm. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. Panza Collection, Gift, 1991 © Doug Wheeler

Doug Wheeler. PSAD Synthetic Desert III, 1971 (detail). Ink on paper, 61.1 x 91.4 cm. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. Panza Collection, Gift, 1991 © Doug Wheeler

Synthetic Desert Sound Map, 2017. Ink & colored pencil on drafting film, 33 x 28 inches. Working Drawing for Mapping Sound Program in PSAD Synthetic Desert III, 1968 © Doug Wheeler

Installation view: Doug Wheeler: PSAD Synthetic Desert III, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, March 24–August 2, 2017. Photo: David Heald © Solomon R. Guggenheim FoundationDoug Wheeler: PSAD Synthetic Desert III is organized by Jeffrey Weiss, Senior Curator, and

Doug Wheeler: PSAD Synthetic Desert III is organized by Jeffrey Weiss, Senior Curator, and Francesca Esmay, Conservator, Panza Collection, with Melanie Taylor, Director, Exhibition Design, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. To realize the artwork, the museum is working closely with Raj Patel and Joseph Digerness of Arup, a design firm that specializes in the acoustic properties of built space. The presentation is executed in conjunction with the Guggenheim’s Panza Collection Initiative, an ongoing study devoted to questions around fabrication and installation of Minimal, Post-Minimal, and Conceptual art.

Images courtesy Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum.

Viewpoints: Latin America in Photographs at The New York Public Library, March 24 – June 28, 2017

“The geography, people, and rich culture of Latin America have long inspired photographers to capture visually their experiences and impressions. Their photographs, in turn, entice viewers to marvel at that which is foreign or to reminisce about the familiar. Drawn exclusively from The New York Public Library’s Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs, Photography Collection, this exhibition presents images of Latin America from the 1850s through the present, arranged in parallel trajectories to highlight the contexts in which they were made. Works by photographers resident of or native to the region appear across from those taken by photographers who approached Latin America as visitors. The exhibition thus seeks to provide insight into varying cultural perspectives, historical circumstances, and artistic motivations, be they to survey the land, document industrial projects, cater to the tourist market, or express personal heritage and culture.

The first half of the exhibition presents works from the 1850s through the turn of the 20th century, a time when most photographers in Latin America were European émigrés. They established their studios on prominent streets of major cities and catered to an elite and a foreign clientele. As a result, most of the photographs to emerge from the period were either portraits of individuals or images that confirmed prevailing perceptions of the country and its people. Likewise, travelers visiting the region documented their adventures as they focused on the dramatic landscapes, the “exotic,” and scenes that would impress audiences at home.” — Introductory Wall Texts

Courret Hermanos, carte-de-visite, ca. 1863. NYPL, The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints, and Photographs

Louis-Édouard Roussel, Destruction of the Siege of Puebla, 1863. NYPL, The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints, and Photograph

Henry DeWitt Moulton & Alexander Gardner, Panorama of North Island, Chincha Islands, with Part of Fleet Waiting for Guano. No. 1, ca. 1865. NYPL, The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints, and Photographs

Esteban Gonnet, Entrada al Cementerio Inglés (Entrance to the English Cemetery), ca. 1866. NYPL, The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints, and Photographs

Yndia del Cuzco e Indio de Puno, ca. 1868. NYPL, The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints, and Photographs

Alfred Percival Maudslay, Tikal, Province of Petén, Guatemala, 1882. NYPL, The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints, and Photographs

Dana B. Merrill, image from the album Views of the Estrada de Ferro Madeira e Mamoré Amazonas & Matto Grosso, Brazil S.A., 1909–12. NYPL, The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints, and Photographs

Martín Chambi, Campesino con Llama, Sicuani-Cusco (Peasant with Llama, Sicuani-Cusco), 1938. NYPL, The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints, and Photographs. © Archivo Fotográfico Martín Chambi Cusco – Perú

Margaret Bourke-White, Coffee Picker, São Martinho, Brazil, 1936. NYPL, The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints, and Photographs. © Estate of Margaret Bourke-White/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

Douglas Sandhage, Tefé, Brazil, 1974. NYPL, The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints, and Photographs. © Douglas Sandhage

Daniel Chauche, Cofrades, Nebaj, 1989. NYPL, The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints, and Photographs. © Daniel Chauche

Flor Garduño, Polvo Serán, Mas Polvo Enamorado (Dust They Become, But Dust in Love), Toledo, Bolivia, 1990. NYPL, The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints, and Photographs. © Flor Garduño

Valdir Cruz, Women—Crab Hunting (Irokai-teri), 1997. NYPL, The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints, and Photographs. © Valdir Cruz

Edward Ranney, Palpa Valley, 2004. NYPL, The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints, and Photographs. © Edward Ranney

Viewpoints: Latin America in Photographs was curated by Elizabeth Cronin.

Images courtesy The New York Public Library.