Wayne Thiebaud, Draftsman at The Morgan Library & Museum, May 18 – September 23, 2018

“Best known for his rich, colorful paintings of cakes, ice cream cones, and candy counters, California artist Wayne Thiebaud (b. 1920) has been an avid and prolific draftsman since he began his career as an illustrator and cartoonist. Featuring subjects that range from deli counters and solitary figures to dramatic views of San Francisco’s plunging streets, Thiebaud’s drawings endow the most common objects and everyday scenes with a sense of poetry and nostalgia.

Wayne Thiebaud, Draftsman is the first exhibition to explore the full scope of the artist’s works on paper, including quick sketches, finished pastels, watercolors, and charcoal drawings. The earliest of the almost eighty-five works on view are cartoons from the 1940s, while the most recent feature landscape drawings inspired by the Sacramento River valley.” — Morgan Library

One day Kathan brought down lunch, which was a cheese sandwich, a couple of olives, and a beer, and I said, “Before we eat that, I think I’ll draw it.” — Wayne Thiebaud

Installation view of “Early Drawings”. Photo by Corrado Serra for Arts Summary

Installation view of “Early Drawings”. Photo by Corrado Serra for Arts Summary

Installation view of “Foodstuff”. Photo by Corrado Serra for Arts Summary

Installation view of “Foodstuff”. Photo by Corrado Serra for Arts Summary

Candy Sticks, 1964, watercolor and graphite. Yale University Art Gallery, Bequest of Susan Morse Hilles. © Wayne Thiebaud/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

Installation view of “Jelly Apples”. Photo by Corrado Serra for Arts Summary

Nine Jelly Apples, 1964, watercolor and graphite. Yale University Art Gallery, Gift of George Hopper Fitch, B.A. 1932. Photography by Tony De Camillo. © Wayne Thiebaud/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

Installation view. Photo by Corrado Serra for Arts Summary

Installation view of “Sketches”. Photo by Corrado Serra for Arts Summary

Page of Sketches with Ties, 1960s–70s, pen and ink and pastel. From the artist’s studio. © Wayne Thiebaud/ Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

Page of Sketches with Movie Billboard, ca. 1990s, pen and ink. From the artist’s studio. © Wayne Thiebaud/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

Installation view of “Tradition”. Photo by Corrado Serra for Arts Summary

Installation view of “Tradition”. Photo by Corrado Serra for Arts Summary

Toys, 1971, charcoal. From the artist’s studio. © Wayne Thiebaud/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

Installation view. Photo by Corrado Serra for Arts Summary

Candy Ball Machine, 1977, gouache and pastel. Collection of Gretchen and John Berggruen, San Francisco. © Wayne Thiebaud/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

Installation view. Photo by Corrado Serra for Arts Summary

Installation view. Photo by Corrado Serra for Arts Summary

Installation view of “Cityscapes and Landscapes”. Photo by Corrado Serra for Arts Summary

Three Roads, 1983, charcoal. Private collection. © Wayne Thiebaud/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

Installation view of “Cityscapes and Landscapes”. Photo by Corrado Serra for Arts Summary

Installation view of “Cityscapes and Landscapes”. Photo by Corrado Serra for Arts Summary

Installation view of “Cityscapes and Landscapes”. Photo by Corrado Serra for Arts Summary

Installation view of “Cityscapes and Landscapes”. Photo by Corrado Serra for Arts Summary

Study for Brown River, 2002, charcoal. From the artist’s studio. © Wayne Thiebaud/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

“The Morgan is delighted to present this groundbreaking exhibition,” said Colin B. Bailey, director of the museum. “Understanding the importance of drawing in Wayne Thiebaud’s career is fundamental to understanding his art and his artistic development. Throughout the exhibition, Thiebaud’s ability to find inspiration in the prosaic and familiar is on vivid display. The Morgan is deeply grateful to the artist for his cooperation in the organization of the exhibition and for his generosity in agreeing to lend so many works to it.” 

Wayne Thiebaud, Draftsman is organized by the Morgan Library & Museum, New York. The curator of the exhibition is Isabelle Dervaux, Acquavella Curator and Department Head, Modern and Contemporary Drawings, the Morgan Library & Museum. 

Waste No More by Eileen Fisher DesignWork at WantedDesign during NYCxDESIGN, Terminal Stores, Manhattan, May 19-22, 2018

During WantedDesign’s showcase for NYCxDESIGN 2018 at the historic Terminal Stores space in Manhattan, Eileen Fisher DesignWork presents “Waste No More”, a new line of artistic wall work, fabrics and pillows for the architecture and design community. The New York exhibition follows a groundbreaking exhibition in April of the same title curated by Li Edelkoort at the largest interior design show in Europe, the Salone del Mobile, Milan.

The installation at WantedDesign demonstrates the inherent aesthetics of recuperated materials in contemporary design. The zero-waste works have been developed by longtime Eileen Fisher designer, collaborator and artist Sigi Ahl, in partnership with a dedicated team at Eileen Fisher’s sorting and recycling facility in Irvington, New York. DesignWork will also be featured at the AIA Conference at the Javits Center June 21-23, 2018.

Images courtesy Eileen Fisher DesignWork.

“Waste No More” at Salone del Mobile, Milan, April 17 – 22, 2018:

Georgia O’Keeffe: Visions of Hawai‘i at New York Botanical Garden, May 19 – October 28, 2018

Photographs by Corrado Serra.

“The New York Botanical Garden’s landmark 2018 exhibition, Georgia O’Keeffe: Visions of Hawai‘i, will focus on the iconic artist’s immersion in the Hawaiian Islands in 1939. Visitors will experience a lush flower show in the Garden’s Enid A. Haupt Conservatory evoking the gardens and landscapes that inspired O’Keeffe as well as the complex story of the flora and unique ecology of Hawai‘i. Curated by art historian Theresa Papanikolas, Ph.D., Deputy Director of Art and Programs and Curator of European and American Art at the Honolulu Museum of Art, the exhibition will feature 20 of O’Keeffe’s depictions of Hawai‘i—including paintings not seen together in New York since their 1940 debut.

In 1939, at the age of 51, O’Keeffe traveled on commission to Hawai‘i to produce images for a Hawaiian Pineapple Company promotional campaign. Her nine weeks on O‘ahu, Maui, Kaua‘i, and the Big Island of Hawai‘i resulted in stunning depictions of mountains and waterfalls as well as her signature close-cropped views of flowers and plants she observed. At the time of her trip, O’Keeffe was among the most famous artists in the United States, best known for her depictions of the stark landscape and desert flora of her beloved New Mexico. Georgia O’Keeffe: Visions of Hawai‘i, will explore this lesser-known chapter in her career, the enduring cultural impact of mid-century perceptions of Hawai‘i, and the ecological complexity of the Hawaiian Islands—one of the most biologically diverse places on Earth—hidden behind O’Keeffe’s depictions. Integrating art, horticulture, and historical interpretation, the exhibition will explore the Hawai‘i that O’Keeffe experienced and also reveal the complex history of the Hawaiian Islands that she was not familiar with at the time.” — NYBG

Harold Stein. Georgia O’Keeffe on Leho‘ula Beach, near ‘Aleamai, Hāna, Maui, 1939

White Lotus, 1939,  Muscartine Art Center, Iowa

Installation view

Hibiscus with Plumeria, 1939, Smithsonian American Art Museum

Left: Untitled (Hibiscus), 1939. Right: Untitled (Yellow Flower), 1939. Both: Georgia O’Keeffe Museum, Santa Fe.

Installation view

Installation view

Installation view of “Montain Views”

Left: Cup of Silver Ginger, 1939, Baltimore Museum of Art. Right: Bella Donna with Pink Torch Ginger Bud, 1939, Private Collection

Installation view of “Tropical Wonders”

Left: Fishhook from Hawai’i, N.1, 1939, Brooklyn Museum. Right: Papaya Tree, Iao Valley, Maui, 1939, Honolulu Museum of Art

Left: Heliconia, Crab’s Claw Ginger, 1939, Collection of Sharon Twigg-Smith. Right: Pineapple Bud, 1939, Private Collection

Installation view of “Ocean Views”

Please note:  Most Paintings © 2018 Georgia O’Keeffe Museum / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Black Out: Silhouettes Then and Now at National Portrait Gallery, May 11, 2018 – March 24, 2019

“’Black Out: Silhouettes Then and Now’ is the first major museum exhibition to explore the art form of cut-paper profiles in terms of their rich historical roots and powerful contemporary presence. Well before the advent of photography in 1839, silhouettes democratized portraiture. Offering virtually instantaneous likenesses of everyone from presidents to those who were enslaved, silhouettes cost far less than oil paintings and could be made with inexpensive materials. Museums have paid little attention to the art form, but ‘Black Out’ aims to broaden the traditional American art canon by placing silhouettes—and their subjects—at the forefront. 

The exhibition, which primarily features works on paper, will also bring together sculptures, prints, media art and mixed-media installations. Ranging in scale from 3 inches to nearly 40 feet, and featuring art from 1796 to today, the exhibition presents around 50 unique objects.” — National Portrait Gallery

“With both historical and contemporary explorations into the form of silhouette, ‘Black Out’ reveals new pathways between past and present, particularly with regard to how we can reassess notions of race, power, individualism and, even, the digital self,” Naeem said. “‘Black Out’ unpacks the art of silhouettes as a potent art form, revealing the paradoxes of a country roiling with ideals of freedom and the trauma of slavery in the 1800s and the messiness of our modern lives.”

Moses Williams, Cutter of Profiles by Raphaelle Peale, by Moses Williams. Cut paper and ink on paper, c. 1803. The Library Company of Philadelphia

Chin Sung by Auguste Edouart. Lithograph and cut paper on paper, 1841. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of Robert L. McNeil, Jr.

John Quincy Adams by Auguste Edouart. Lithograph, chalk and cut paper on paper, 1841. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of Robert L. McNeil, Jr.

Euphrasie Borghese by Auguste Edouart. Lithograph and cut paper on paper, 1841. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of Robert L. McNeil, Jr.

Robert H. Collyer and Monsieur De Bonneville by Auguste Edouart. Ink wash, chalk and cut paper on paper, 1842. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of Robert L. McNeil, Jr.

Joaquin Cesar de Figaniere e Morao and Danel J. Desmond by Auguste Edouart. Ink wash and cut paper on paper, 1843. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of Robert L. McNeil, Jr.

Catharine Williams and William Mead by Auguste Edouart. Ink wash, chalk and cut paper on paper, 1843. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of Robert L. McNeil, Jr.

Laura Dewey Bridgman by Auguste Edouart. Ink, chalk and cut paper on paper, 1843. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of Robert L. McNeil, Jr.

Oliver Caswell by Auguste Edouart. Lithograph, chalk and cut paper on paper, 1843. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of Robert L. McNeil, Jr.

Thomas Sully by Auguste Edouart. Ink, chalk and cut paper on paper, 1843. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of Robert L. McNeil, Jr.

Mary Phelps Austin Holley by Auguste Edouart. Ink, chalk and cut paper on paper, 1844. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of Robert L. McNeil, Jr.

Maibaum by Kristi Malakoff. Paper and foam core, 2009. Photo: Kristi Malakoff

Profile by Kumi Yamashita. Wood, single light source, and cast shadow, 1994. Photo: Ryo Sekimura

Chair by Kumi Yamashita. Wood, single light source, and cast shadow, 2015. Photo: Hiroshi Noguchi

Origami by Kumi Yamashita. Japanese paper, single light source, and cast shadow

Auntie Walker’s Wall Sampler for Civilians by Kara Walker. Cut paper on wall. 2013 © Kara Walker, courtesy of Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York. Installation view: “We at the Camden Arts Centre are Exceedingly Proud to present an Exhibition of Capable Artworks by the Notable Hand of the Celebrated American, Kara Elizabeth Walker, Negress.” Camden Arts Centre, London, 2013. Photo: Angus Mill Photography.

Auntie Walker’s Wall Sampler for Savages by Kara Walker. Cut paper on wall, 2013 © Kara Walker, courtesy of Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York. Installation view: “We at the Camden Arts Centre are Exceedingly Proud to present an Exhibition of Capable Artworks by the Notable Hand of the Celebrated American, Kara Elizabeth Walker, Negress.” Camden Arts Centre, London, 2013. Photo: Angus Mill Photography.

Burning African Village Play Set with Big House and Lynching by Kara Walker. Laser cut steel and paint, 2006 © Kara Walker, courtesy of Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York. Photo: Luciano Fileti

Entangled by Camille Utterback. Interactive installation (depth camera, custom software, computer, projection, lighting), 2018

“Black Out: Silhouettes Then and Now” is curated by Asma Naeem, the Portrait Gallery’s curator of prints, drawings and media arts.

Images courtesy National Portrait Gallery.  

Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination at The Met Fifth Avenue and The Met Cloisters, May 10 – October 8, 2018

Photographs by Corrado Serra.

“’Heavenly Bodies’ features the work of designers who for the most part were raised in the Roman Catholic tradition. While their current relationships to Catholicism vary, most acknowledge its enduring influence on their imaginations. On the surface, this influence is expressed through explicit Catholic imagery and symbolism as well as references to specific garments worn by the clergy and religious orders. On a deeper level, it manifests as a reliance on storytelling, and specifically on metaphor—which the sociologist Andrew Greeley describes as the essential characteristic of a particular sensibility he defines as ‘the Catholic imagination.’ 

This exhibition explores how the Catholic imagination has shaped the creativity of designers and how it is conveyed through their narrative impulses. These impulses are reflected in the organization of the exhibition, which unfolds as a series of short stories told through conversations between religious artworks in The Met collection and fashions of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. The Catholic imagination also operates on an experiential level, and, accordingly, the show’s configuration evokes the concept and practice of a pilgrimage.

The journey begins at The Met Fifth Avenue in the Byzantine and medieval art galleries and continues in the Anna Wintour Costume Center. It concludes at The Met Cloisters in northern Manhattan, where elements from French monasteries have been rebuilt as four cloisters. While the fashions might seem far removed from the sanctity of the Catholic Church, these contexts illuminate the myriad ways in which they embody the imaginative traditions of Catholicism. Taken together, the fashions and artworks in ‘Heavenly Bodies’ sing in unison with distinctly enchanted and enchanting voices.” — Introductory Wall Text

The Met Fifth Avenue

The Met Cloisters

A collaboration between The Costume Institute and the Department of Medieval Art and The Cloisters, the exhibition is organized by Andrew Bolton, Wendy Yu Curator in Charge of The Costume Institute, working together with colleagues in The Met’s Medieval department: C. Griffith Mann, Michel David-Weill Curator in Charge of the Department of Medieval Art and The Cloisters; Barbara Drake Boehm, Paul and Jill Ruddock Senior Curator for The Met Cloisters; Helen C. Evans, Mary and Michael Jaharis Curator of Byzantine Art; and Melanie Holcomb, Curator.

Tanya Aguiñiga: Craft & Care at Museum of Arts and Design (MAD), May 8 – October 2, 2018

“The Museum of Arts and Design (MAD) is pleased to present the first institutional solo exhibition of works by Los Angeles–based artist and designer Tanya Aguiñiga. Craft & Care highlights Aguiñiga’s practice at the intersection of fiber art, design, social practice, and activism, with a focus on motherhood, care, border issues, and the creation of community—themes that run throughout the artist’s work. The exhibition spotlights AMBOS Project (Art Made Between Opposite Sides), Aguiñiga’s ongoing activation of the US–Mexico border.

Aguiñiga’s work, ranging from her ‘Performance Crafting’ series—which uses craft to generate dialogues about identity, culture, and gender—to furniture whose material and form reimagine its functionality to provide ‘support,’ asserts design (and craft) thinking as political. At the heart of her practice is an inquiry into how community is created, and the role that craft, design, and materiality play in its formation.” — MAD 

“We are thrilled to bring Tanya’s multifaceted practice to MAD,” said Shannon R. Stratton, MAD’s William and Mildred Lasdon Chief Curator. “Her work is compassionate and courageous, and her emphasis on interaction and collaboration is inspiring. Both her process and her finished pieces testify to the power of craft and design to bring people together.”

Tanya Aguiñiga, CRAFTA, Craft in the Post NAFTA Era, 2012.  Mixed media, 40ft wide x 12 feet deep. Courtesy of the artist

Tanya Aguiñiga, Performance Crafting, Community Felt-In, 2014. 6ft high x 48 ft long. Courtesy of the artist

Tanya Aguiñiga, Support, 2014, from Future Tropes Denim, thread, salt, rice. Variable. Courtesy of Volume Gallery, Chicago

Tanya Aguiñiga, Border Quipu/Quipu Fronterizo, 2016.  Recycled dress and bathing suit straps. Variable. Courtesy of Gina Clyne Photography

Tanya Aguiñiga, Reindigenizing the Self, 2017. Installation View. Courtesy of Volume Gallery, Chicago

Tanya Aguiñiga, Reindigenizing the Self (detail), 2017

MAD presents Craft & Care as part of this season’s investigation of the political impact of craft. It is installed in the second-floor galleries, across from and in dialogue with the current exhibition La Frontera: Encounters Along the Border, which explores the border as a complex landscape of human interaction through the medium of contemporary jewelry.

Tanya Aguiñiga: Craft & Care is curated by Shannon R. Stratton, MAD’s William and Mildred Lasdon Chief Curator, with the support of Assistant Manager of Curatorial Affairs Angelik Vizcarrondo-Laboy. 

Images courtesy Museum of Arts and Design.

Aaron Fowler: Bigger Than Me at New Museum, Storefront Window, May 2 – August 19, 2018

“Aaron Fowler (b. 1988, St. Louis, MO) creates elaborate assemblage paintings from discarded found objects and unconventional materials sourced from his local surroundings. Through intuitive layering of castoff furniture, oil and acrylic paint, and collaged elements including CDs, water bottles, iridescent LED lights, car parts, and plastic bags, Fowler meticulously constructs hybrid tableaux infused with a sense of raw urgency. Taking compositional cues from American history painting and religious iconography, Fowler inserts both imagined and concrete narratives from his personal experience. Each work illustrates a poignant subject or event that holds significance for the artist, from portraits of incarcerated family members and friends lost in acts of violence to fantastical scenarios incorporating historical figures, role models, and public icons. For the window of the New Museum’s 231 Bowery Building, Fowler presents Bigger Than Me, a new installation of his work.” — New Museum

Aaron Fowler, Brown Town, 2017. Christmas tree trunks, fake palm tree, pianos, shirtsleeves, shirts, acrylic and enamel paint, paint tubes, dirt, tire, car parts, hair weave, Minions backpack, graduation cap, CDs, LED rope lights, and Plexiglas on wood panels and truck topper. 16 x 12 x 3 ft (4.9 x 3.7 x 1 m). Courtesy the artist

Aaron Fowler, El Camino, 2017. Acrylic paint, enamel paint, car parts, hair weave, mirrors, CDs, fan, fitted cap, tires, poker tables, speakers, digital print, and concrete on conference tables. 14 x 11 x 4 ft (4.3 x 3.4 x 1.2 m). Courtesy the artist

Aaron Fowler, Me and E, 2017. Acrylic and oil paint, gold leaf, charcoal, sand, spray foam, drywall, canvas, screws, CDs, hair weave, beard hair, seashells, shoes, green shorts, fitted cap, hemp bracelets, rope lighting, ‘For Sale’ sign, mirrors, cotton balls, Home Depot bucket, Patron bottles, barstools, metal sheets, paper, and digital print on shower doors, wooden doors, and wood panels. 13 x 15 ft (4 x 4.6 m). Courtesy the artist

Aaron Fowler, Jmae, 2017. Acrylic paint, mirror, Afro weds with tags, gold lead, photo print, lace dress jackets, and plastic balls on a hot tub cover. 8 x 9 ft (2.4 x 2.7 m). Courtesy the artist

Aaron Fowler, E$, 2017. Acrylic paint, trophies, chandelier crystals, photo print, screws, hair weave, Afro weave, mirror, and rope on metal and wood restaurant stools suspended from chain. 4 1/2 x 9 ft (1.4 x 2.7 m). Courtesy the artist

Aaron Fowler, Mom Knows, 2016. Acrylic paint, photo print, hair weave, fitted caps, concrete, mirror, unfinished door, rope, and Afro wigs on wood and entertainment center. 125 x 176 x 30 in (317.5 x 447 x 76.2 cm) and 40 x 27 x 3 in (101.6 x 68.6 x 7.6 cm). Courtesy the artist

“Aaron Fowler: Bigger Than Me” is part of a series of window installations that relaunches the program originally mounted at the New Museum in the 1980s. This program included now-legendary projects by Jeff Koons, David Hammons, Linda Montano, Bruce Nauman, Gran Fury, and others. This project is curated by Margot Norton, Curator.

Images courtesy New Museum.

One Hand Clapping at Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, May 4 – October 21, 2018

“The artists in One Hand Clapping explore our changing relationship with the future. Produced in both new and traditional mediums—from virtual reality technology to oil on canvas—their commissioned works challenge visions of a global, homogeneous, and technocratic future. On Tower Level 5, Wong Ping creates a multimedia installation centered on a colorful, racy animated tale that explores the tension between an aging population and the relentless pace of a digital economy; in her paintings and sculptures, Duan Jianyu depicts a surreal, transitory place where the rural meets the urban; and Lin Yilin constructs a virtual-reality simulation featuring a professional basketball star, testing the potential for using technology to inhabit the experience of another. On Tower Level 7, Cao Fei examines the new realities and potential crisis driven by automation and robotics at some of China’s most advanced storage and distribution facilities, and Samson Young reflects on our obsession with ritual and authenticity through a sonic and sculptural environment of imaginary musical instruments and their digitally engineered sounds.

The exhibition title One Hand Clapping is derived from a koan—riddles used in Zen Buddhist practice to challenge logical reasoning—that asks, ‘We know the sound of two hands clapping. But what is the sound of one hand clapping?’ Emerging from a tradition that originates in China’s Tang period (618–907), the phrase ‘one hand clapping’ encompasses a history of cross-cultural translation and appropriation that continues into the present, from its citation as the epigraph to J. D. Salinger’s Nine Stories (1953) to its referencing in the titles of a Cantopop song and an Australian film and the name of a British band. In this light, ‘one hand clapping’ becomes a metaphor for the processes by which meaning is fabricated, transmitted, and restated in a globalized world. The image of ‘one hand clapping’ also suggests connotations of solitude and the ability of artists to put forth a singular perspective and to challenge prevailing beliefs, stereotypes, and conventional power structures.” — Guggenheim Museum

Installation view of Tower 5. Center: Wong Ping. Dear, can I give you a hand?, 2018 (back). Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Collection 2018.18 © Wong Ping. Photo: Corrado Serra for Arts Summary.

Wong Ping. Dear, can I give you a hand?, 2018 (front). Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Collection 2018.18 © Wong Ping. Photo: Corrado Serra for Arts Summary.

Duan Jianyu(b. 1970). Spring River in the Flower Moon Night 1, 2017. Oil on canvas. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Collection, 2018 2018.14. Image courtesy Guggenheim Museum.

Duan Jianyu (b. 1970). Picnic (series), 2018. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Collection, 2018 2018.15. Photo: Corrado Serra for Arts Summary.

Lin Yilin. The First 1/3 Monad, 2018. Color video, with sound, 5 min., 53 sec., edition 1/3. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Collection 2018.16.1 © Lin Yilin Photo: Courtesy the artist. Image courtesy Guggenheim Museum.

Samson Young (b. 1979). Possible Music #1 (feat. NESS & Shane Aspegren), 2018. Installation. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Collection, 2018. Photo: Corrado Serra for Arts Summary.

Samson Young (b. 1979). Possible Music #1 (feat. NESS & Shane Aspegren), 2018. Installation. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Collection, 2018. Photo: Corrado Serra for Arts Summary.

Cao Fei. Asia One, 2018 (detail). Multimedia installation. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Collection 2018.12 © Cao Fei. Photo: Corrado Serra for Arts Summary.

Cao Fei. Asia One, 2018 (detail). Multimedia installation. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Collection 2018.12 © Cao Fei. Photo: Corrado Serra for Arts Summary.

Cao Fei. Asia One, 2018 (detail). Multimedia installation. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Collection 2018.12 © Cao Fei. Photo: Corrado Serra for Arts Summary.

One Hand Clapping is organized by Xiaoyu Weng, The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Associate Curator of Chinese Art, and Hou Hanru, Consulting Curator, The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative. Kyung An, Assistant Curator, Asian Art, provides curatorial support. The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative is part of the Guggenheim’s Asian Art Initiative, directed by Alexandra Munroe, Samsung Senior Curator, Asian Art, and Senior Advisor, Global Arts.

Anna Boghiguian: The Loom of History at New Museum, May 2 – August 19, 2018

Photographs by Corrado Serra.

The Loom of History marks the first US solo exhibition of Armenian-Egyptian artist Anna Boghiguian (b. 1946, Cairo, Egypt). Her raw and expressionistic works combine painting, drawing, writing, collage, and sculpture to contemplate the past and present through intersections of economics, philosophy, literature, and myth. 

Her New Museum exhibition brings together a selection of recent cutout paper figures, mixed-media works on paper, collaged paintings in beehive frames, a large-scale painted sailcloth, and hand-painted texts on the gallery walls. Collectively, the works in The Loom of History address subjects that have long animated Boghiguian’s practice, including wars and revolutions, histories of materials and labor, and the ancient roots of modern imperialism. In particular, a number of works in the show address the economics of the cotton trade and its fundamental relationship to slavery in the United States—a violent and abusive history whose legacy has shaped racial inequities that persist today. 

Since the 1970s, Boghiguian has traveled continuously, and her work has charted her impressions and observations of various societies, as well as her experiences of non-belonging. While her recent cutout paper figures and curtainlike paintings on sailcloth reference forms of popular storytelling or folk theater, her tabletlike drawings—a touchstone of her largely portable oeuvre—appear as a frag-mented film script or exploded book. Other cutout figures and drawings in The Loom of History bear testament to the artist’s poetic and introspective investigations of sensory organs such as the ear, a motif that beckons the viewer to hark back to the past, or face its perennial return.” — Introductory Wall Text.

Anna Boghiguian: The Loom of History is curated by Natalie Bell, Associate Curator.

Chaim Soutine: Flesh at The Jewish Museum, May 4 – September 16, 2018

“Chaim Soutine (1893–1943) is one of the twentieth century’s great painters of still life. In the Paris of the 1920s, Soutine was a double outsider—an immigrant Jew and a modernist. Guided by his expressive artistic instincts, he both embraced the traditional genre of still life and exploded it. 

Still-life painting offers an opportunity for an artist to display technical skill and to explore aspects of color, composition, and brushwork. At the Louvre, Soutine studied the canvases of the Old Masters: careful and elaborate arrangements of flowers, fruit, and other food, including hunters’ trophies of game. He transformed such precedents into contorted and turbulent paintings of dead animals, imbued with suffering and anxiety. 

Soutine was born in a Jewish village in the Lithuanian part of western Russia (now Belarus). The region was plagued with anti-Semitic violence—thousands of Jews were killed in pogroms during his childhood. At age twenty, after studying art at the academy in Vilnius for three years, he moved to Paris, the artistic and intellectual center of Europe in the twenties. There, he lived and worked alongside other Jewish emigré artists, including Moïse Kisling, Ossip Zadkine, Jacques Lipchitz, and Amedeo Modigliani, who became a close friend. 

Soutine’s harsh and wrenching portrayals — of beef carcasses, plucked fowl, fish, and game — create a parallel between the animal and human, between beauty and pain. His still-life paintings, produced over a period of thirty years, express with visceral power his painterly mastery and personal passion.” — Introductory Wall Text, Stephen Brown, Neubauer Family Foundation Associate Curator; Esti Dunow and Maurice Tuchman, Consulting Curators

“They say Courbet could give in his nudes all the character of Paris. I want to show all that is Paris in the carcass of an ox.” — Chaim Soutine

Chaim Soutine, Still Life with Fruit, 1919, oil on canvas. Private Collection. Photograph by Reginart Collections

Chaim Soutine, Fish, Peppers, Onions, c. 1919, oil on canvas. Barnes Foundation, Merion and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Image provided by The Barnes Foundation

Chaim Soutine, Still Life with Rayfish, c. 1924, oil on canvas. Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Mr. and Mrs. Klaus G. Perls Collection, 1997. Artwork © Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; Image provided by The Metropolitan Museum of Art / Art Resource, NY

Chaim Soutine, Chicken Hung Before a Brick Wall, 1925, oil on canvas. Kunstmuseum Bern, Switzerland. Artwork © Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; Image provided by Erich Lessing / Art Resource, NY

Chaim Soutine, Hanging Turkey, c. 1925, oil on canvas. Private Collection, courtesy of McClain Gallery, Houston. Artwork © Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; Image provided by The Henry and Rose Pearlman Collection / Art Resource, New York; photograph by Bruce M. White

Chaim Soutine, Dead Fowl, 1926, oil on canvas. Art Institute of Chicago, Joseph Winterbotham Collection, 1937.167. Artwork © Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; Image provided by the Art Institute of Chicago / Art Resource, NY

Chaim Soutine, Hanging Turkey, c. 1925, oil on canvas. Private Collection, courtesy of McClain Gallery, Houston. Artwork © Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Chaim Soutine, Carcass of Beef, c. 1925, oil on canvas. Collection of Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York; Room of Contemporary Art Fund, 1939 (RCA1939:13.2). Artwork © Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Chaim Soutine, The Rabbit, c. 1924, oil on canvas. Private collection, New York. Artwork © Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photograph by Joshua Nefsky

Chaim Soutine, Plucked Goose, c. 1933, oil on panel. Private Collection. Artwork © Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photograph by Joshua Nefsky.

Chaim Soutine, Sheep Behind a Fence, c. 1940, oil on canvas. Private Collection. Artwork © Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Soutine at Chatel-Guyon in central France (Puy-de- Dome), 1928. Image provided by the Kluver/Martin Archive

The exhibition is organized by Stephen Brown, Neubauer Family Foundation Associate Curator, The Jewish Museum, with consulting curators Esti Dunow and Maurice Tuchman, authors of Chaim Soutine (1893-1943) catalogue raisonné (1993).

Images courtesy The Jewish Museum.

Lee Friedlander in Louisiana & Lee Friedlander: American Musicians at The New Orleans Museum of Art (NOMA), April 27 – August 12, 2018

“A major exhibition of Lee Friedlander (American, born 1934), one of the most famous living American photographers. Lee Friedlander in Louisiana explores the ways in which Louisiana, and New Orleans in particular, have had a profound impact on the career of this important artist, while also highlighting Friedlander’s significance as a documentarian of the local music community. Comprised of vintage prints and never before seen images, the photographs of jazz musicians, monuments, and street life demonstrate how Louisiana has been central to the development of one of the country’s most influential photographers.

Lee Friedlander’s relationship with New Orleans began in 1957 when he first visited the city as an employee of Atlantic Records to produce portraits for album covers. From that point on, he would be a frequent visitor to the city, training his camera on second line parades, crowded streetcars, and the evolving architecture of downtown. In what is now known as his signature style, Friedlander welcomes reflections, shadows, and obstructions that transform the people and places of New Orleans into playful pictures that are both visual puzzles, and humanistic documents.” — NOMA

Lee Friedlander in Louisiana

New Orleans, Louisiana, 1968. Gelatin silver print. Museum Purchase through the National Endowment for the Arts Grant

New Orleans, Louisiana, 1969. Gelatin silver print. Courtesy of the artist and Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco

New Orleans, Louisiana, 1961. Gelatin silver print. Courtesy of the artist and Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco

New Orleans, Louisiana, 1967. Gelatin silver print. Courtesy of the artist and Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco

New Orleans, Louisiana, 1958. Gelatin silver print. Private Collection, San Francisco

Lafayette, Louisiana, 1968. Gelatin silver print. Courtesy of the artist and Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco

New Orleans, Louisiana, 1959. Gelatin silver print. Courtesy of the artist and Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco

Lee Friedlander: American Musicians

Tammy Wynette, 1971. Iris print on rag paper. Courtesy of the artist and Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco

John Coltrane, 1960. Iris print on rag paper. Courtesy of the artist and Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco

Johnny Cash, 1969. Iris print on rag paper. Courtesy of the artist and Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco

Ray Charles, 1958. Iris print on rag paper. Courtesy of the artist and Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco

Aretha Franklin, 1968. Iris print on rag paper. Courtesy of the artist and Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco

Champion Jack Dupree, 1958. Iris print on rag paper. Courtesy of the artist and Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco

“As an artist whose images straddle the border of art and document, Friedlander was uniquely positioned to preserve the social and visual phenomena of New Orleans, creating a varied body of work that is as humanistic as it is artistic,” said Susan Taylor, NOMA’s Montine McDaniel Freeman Director. “We are delighted to be the first institution to examine the scope and influence of Friedlander’s work in New Orleans on the fields of photography, music, and history.”

“While everyone is trying to get the perfect picture, Lee Friedlander’s approach seems to declare that photographs should be about how the world exists, not how we want it to be,” said Russell Lord, Freeman Family Curator of Photographs. “Lee Friedlander in Louisiana is, therefore, both a fitting tribute to a great American photographer, but also a tribute to this city’s rich visual and social character during its Tricentennial year.”

Images courtesy of The New Orleans Museum of Art.

Shape of Light: 100 Years of Photography and Abstract Art at Tate Modern, May 2 – October 14, 2018

“A major new exhibition at Tate Modern will reveal the intertwined stories of photography and abstract art. Shape of Light: 100 Years of Photography and Abstract Art will be the first show of this scale to explore photography in relation to the development of abstraction, from the early experiments of the 1910s to the digital innovations of the 21st century. Featuring over 300 works by more than 100 artists, the exhibition will explore the history of abstract photography side-by-side with iconic paintings and sculptures.

Shape of Light will place moments of radical innovation in photography within the wider context of abstract art, such as Alvin Langdon Coburn’s pioneering ‘vortographs’ from 1917. This relationship between media will be explored through the juxtaposition of works by painters and photographers, such as cubist works by George Braque and Pierre Dubreuil or the abstract expressionism of Jackson Pollock and Otto Steinert’s ‘luminograms’. Abstractions from the human body associated with surrealism will include André Kertesz’s Distorsions, Imogen Cunningham’s Triangles and Bill Brandt’s Baie des Anges, Frances 1958, exhibited together with a major painting by Joan Miró. Elsewhere the focus will be on artists whose practice spans diverse media, such as László Moholy-Nagy and Man Ray.

The exhibition will also acknowledge the impact of MoMA’s landmark photography exhibition of 1960, The Sense of Abstraction. Installation photographs of this pioneering show will be displayed with some of the works originally featured in the exhibition, including important works by Edward Weston, Aaron Siskind and a series by Man Ray that has not been exhibited since the MoMA show, 58 years ago.” — Tate Modern

Antony Cairns, born 1980. 
LDN5_051, 
2017. Courtesy of the artist
© Antony Cairns

Barbara Kasten, b.1936. Photogenic Painting, Untitled 74/13, 1974. Photograph, salted paper print, 558 x 762 mm. Courtesy the artist, Thomas Dane Gallery and Bortolami Gallery, New York 
© Barbara Kasten

Daisuke Yokota, b.1983. Untitled, 
2014. 
Courtesy the artist and Jean-Kenta Gauthier Gallery 
© Daisuke Yokota

James Welling, born 1951, Untitled
, 1986. Photograph, C-print on paper, 254 x 203 mm. Jack Kirkland Collection, Nottingham © James Welling. Courtesy the artist and David Zwirner, New York/London/Hong Kong and Maureen Paley, London

Alvin Langdon Coburn, 1882-1966. Vortograph, 1917. Photograph, gelatin silver print on paper, 283 x 214 mm. Courtesy of the George Eastman Museum NY 
© The Universal Order.

Marta Hoepffner, 1912–2000. Homage to Kandinsky, 
1937. Photograph, gelatin silver print on paper, 387 x 278 mm. Stadtmuseum Hofheim am Taunus © Estate Marta Hoepffner

Wassily Kandinsky, 1866-1944. Swinging
, 1925. Oil paint on board, 705 x 502 mm. Tate

Man Ray, 1890-1976. Unconcerned Photograph, 1959
. Museum of Modern Art, New York 
© Man Ray Trust/ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2018

Imogen Cunningham, 1883-1976. Triangles, 1928, printed 1947-60. Photograph, gelatin silver print on paper, 119 x 93 mm. Pierre Brahm
© Imogen Cunningham Trust. All rights reserved

Joan Miró, 1893-1983. Painting
, 1927. Tempera and oil paint on canvas, 972 x 1302 mm. Tate
© Succession Miro/ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2018

Pierre Dubreuil, 1872-1944. Interpretation Picasso: The Railway, 
c. 1911. Photograph, gelatin silver print on paper, 238 x 194 mm. Centre Pompidou, Paris Musée national d’art moderne-Centre de création industrielle

Luo Bonian, 1911-2002. Untitled, 
1930s. Courtesy The Three Shadows Photography Art Centre, Beijing 
© Luo Bonian

Edward Ruscha, b.1937. Gilmore Drive-In Theater – 6201 W. Third St., 1967, printed 2013. Photograph, gelatin silver prints on paper, 356 x 279 mm. Courtesy Ed Ruscha and Gagosian Gallery © Ed Ruscha

Jackson Pollock, 1912-1956. Number 23, 1948. Enamel on gesso on paper, 575 x 784 mm. Tate: Presented by the Friends of the Tate Gallery (purchased out of funds provided by Mr and Mrs H.J. Heinz II and H.J. Heinz Co. Ltd) 1960 © ARS, NY and DACS, London 2018

Otto Steinert, 1915-1978. Luminogram II,  1952. Photograph, gelatin silver print on paper, 302 x 401 mm. Jack Kirkland Collection Nottingham © Estate Otto Steinert, Museum Folkwang, Essen

Shape of Light is curated curated by Simon Baker, Senior Curator, International Art (Photography), Tate Modern and Emmanuelle de l’Ecotais, Curator for Photography, Musée d’Art moderne de la Ville de Paris with Shoair Mavlian and Sarah Allen, Assistant Curators, Tate Modern.

Images courtesy Tate Modern.