Machu Picchu and the Golden Empires of Peru at Boca Raton Museum of Art, October 16, 2021 – March 6, 2022

Machu Picchu and the Golden Empires of Peru makes its world premiere in South Florida at the Boca Raton Museum of Art, beginning on October 16, 2021.

The museum experience consists of one of the most impressive gold collections ever to tour the globe, highlighted by a fully intact Gold attire of a Chimú Emperor that dates to 1300 AD, predating the Inca Empire. On loan from Museo Larco and Museo Manuel Chávez Ballon, the exhibition features a stunning selection of 192 priceless artifacts that include the spectacular gold and silver royal burial garments of legendary Andean lords.

This all-new, media-rich, artifact-based museum experience transpors guests into the jewel of the only cradle of civilization in the Southern Hemisphere, the Incan city of Machu Picchu. The exhibition focuses on ancient societies that predate the Inca empire. Rivaled only by Ancient Egypt in longevity and by the Roman Empire in engineering, Andean societies dominated a substantial segment of South America for over 3,000 years.

Visitors to the exhibition will embark on a journey through time and discover a culture that thrived in a genuinely spiritual civilization.” — Boca Raton Museum of Art

Sculptural stirrup spout bottle depicting an anthropomorphic figure with supernatural traits (hero Ai Apaec) holding a knife or tumi. He is wearing a half-moon headdress or crown with a monkey’s head, feline fangs, face paint, shirt with designs of serpents and circles, and wristbands with geometric designs. This piece depicts the transformation of the hero Ai Apaec to a puffer fish after fighting and conquering it in the sea. Mochica. Boom Period (1 AD – 800 AD)
Sculptural stirrup spout bottle depicting a hybrid zoomorphic figure (rampant feline / Moon Animal / Dog or Lunar Fox / Andean dragon). The piece contains details achieved by incrusting 148 shell beads (mother-of-pearl, genus Strombus). Many of them are fragmented. The figure’s eye is chrysocolla. This zoomorphic figure is associated with the night sky. Mochica. Boom Period (1 AD – 800 AD)
Sculptural pitcher depicting an anthropomorphic figure with the head and wings of a long-eared owl or barn owl, necklace of circular beads, shirt with designs of interlaced waves or spirals, and short skirt; the figure is standing under an arch formed by a serpent with two feline heads. There are wave designs on the pitcher’s neck. Mochica, Boom Period (1 AD – 800 AD)
Frontal adornment of gold headdress depicting feline head with feathers, bird-beak nose, and figure with headdress of plumes and triangular pendants, depiction of two animals (monkeys) on the upper part, stepped designs with volutes and two-headed-serpent designs on the lower part. Chimu. Imperial Period (1300 AD – 1532 AD)
Copper funerary mask with applications of shell and stone, depicting an anthropomorphic visage with feline fangs (Ai Apaec). Mochica. Boom Period (1 AD – 800 AD)
Gold and turquoise nose ornament depicting figure with half-moon and club-head headdress, circular ear ornaments and loincloth, holding a rattle. Mochica. Boom Period (1 AD – 800 AD)
Frontal adornment of 18-karat gold headdress depicting a feline head with half-moon headdress and two birds. The gold is a gold-copper-silver ternary alloy with chemical composition of 78.5% gold, 12.5% copper, and 9% silver. The piece received a final treatment known as depletion gilding. Mochica. Boom Period (1 AD – 800 AD)
Ear ornament of gold, shell, and stone (turquoise or malachite), depicting eight iguanas. Four of the iguanas are gold and four are turquoise. Mochica. Boom Period (1 AD – 800 AD)

Images courtesy Boca Raton Museum of Art.