All posts filed under “Photography

Elliott Erwitt: Pittsburgh 1950 at International Center of Photography (ICP), May 23 – September 2, 2018

“In 1950 Elliott Erwitt, then just twenty-two years old, set out to capture Pittsburgh’s transformation from an industrial city into a modern metropolis. Commissioned by Roy Stryker, the mastermind behind the large-scale documentary photography projects launched by the US government during the Great Depression, Erwitt… Read More

Henri Cartier-Bresson: The Decisive Moment at International Center of Photography (ICP), May 23 – September 2, 2018

“Henri Cartier-Bresson: The Decisive Moment examines Cartier-Bresson’s influential publication, widely considered to be one of the most important photobooks of the twentieth century. Pioneering for its emphasis on the photograph itself as a unique narrative form, The Decisive Moment was described by Robert Capa as… Read More

Rebel Spirits: Robert F. Kennedy and Martin Luther King Jr. at New-York Historical Society, February 16 – May 20, 2018

“To commemorate the 50th anniversary of the assassinations of Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert F. Kennedy in 1968, the New-York Historical Society presents an exhibition of photographs and artifacts honoring these visionary leaders who irrevocably changed the United States. Rebel Spirits: Robert F. Kennedy and Martin LuthermKing… Read More

Quicksilver Brilliance: Adolf de Meyer Photographs at The Met Fifth Avenue, through April 7, 2018

“A member of the “international set” in fin-de-siècle Europe, Baron Adolf de Meyer (1868–1946) was also a pioneering art, portrait, and fashion photographer, known for creating images that transformed reality into a beautiful fantasy. The “quicksilver brilliance” that characterized de Meyer’s art led fellow photographer… Read More

Then They Came for Me: Incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II at International Center of Photography, January 26 – May 6, 2018

“Seventy-six years ago, in the name of national security, the US government incarcerated 120,000 American citizens and legal residents without due process and absent the constitutional protection to which they were entitled. Following Japan’s bombing of Pearl Harbor in Hawaii on December 7, 1941, the… Read More