Mi Tierra: Contemporary Artists Explore Place at Denver Art Museum, through October 22, 2017

The Denver Art Museum (DAM) presents Mi Tierra: Contemporary Artists Explore Place, an exhibition of site-specific installations by emerging and mid-career Latino artists that express experiences of contemporary life in the American West.

“We’re proud to support innovative work by artists who bring their unique perspective on the American experience to examine the concept of place as a complex and ever-present force in our lives,” said Christoph Heinrich, Frederick and Jan Mayer Director at the DAM. “By making their process visible to the public, we are providing audiences with the opportunity to see in real time how creative decisions are made and the myriad of factors, from the spaces of our iconic Hamilton building, to the artists’ own experiences, that can influence the final realization of their work.”

“Each artist contributes to the thematic trajectory that explores their ideas related to labor, nostalgia, memory, visibility and displacement,” said Hart. “We hope their installations will inspire a new way of thinking, and offer salient perspectives about the human experience and the relationship between our sense of place and the world views we develop throughout our lives. With migration on the rise worldwide, these artists eloquently explore its transformative effects on both sides of the Mexico-United States border.”

Ana Teresa Fernández, Erasure 1 (performance documentation), 2015. Oil on canvas, 60 x 72 in. Courtesy of the artist and Gallery Wendi Norris, San Francisco. ©Ana Teresa Fernández

Ana Teresa Fernández, Erasure 4 (performance documentation), 2015. Oil on canvas, 60 x 72 in. Courtesy of the artist and Gallery Wendi Norris, San Francisco. ©Ana Teresa Fernández

Carmen Argote, Live/Work (detail of installation), Los Angeles, California

Carmen Argote, concept drawing for Live/Work, 2016. Courtesy and © Carmen Argote

Daniela Edburg, The Plan, 2016. Archival ink print; 22 x 34 in. © Daniela Edburg

Dmitri Obergfell, Statues Also Die (Mauricio) (detail), 2015. Plaster and graphite, dimensions variable. Courtesy of Gildar Gallery and Casa Maauad. ©Dmitri Obergfell

Dmitri Obergfell, Cloud of Unknowing, 2014. Courtesy of Gildar Gallery. Photo: Wes Magyar, ©Dmitri Obergfell

Gabriel Dawe, Plexus A1, 2015. Renwick Gallery of the Smithsonian American Art Museum. Photo by Ron Blunt. Courtesy the artist and Conduit Gallery

Gabriel Dawe, Plexus A1, 2015, Renwick Gallery of the Smithsonian American Art Museum. Courtesy the artist and Conduit Gallery

Jaime Carrejo, Fence and Flag (detail), 2015. Ink, polymer, acrylic and oxidation paint on wood; 48 x 38 x 1 in. Courtesy and © Jaime Carrejo

Justin Favela, Popocatepetl e Iztaccihuatl vistos desde Atlixco after Jose Maria Velasco, 2016. Paper and glue; 64 x 82 x 2 in. Courtesy and © Justin Favela

Ramiro Gomez, Paul Smith Store, 2015. Acrylic on canvas, 72 x 72 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Charlie James Gallery. © Ramiro Gomez

Ramiro Gomez, Las Meninas (Bel Air), 2013. Acrylic on cardboard. Courtesy of the artist and Charlie James Gallery. Photo: David Feldman, © Ramiro Gomez

Xochi Solis, A sunrise makes you feel so small, 2016. Gouache, house paint, acrylic, acetate, colored paper and found images on museum board. Courtesy and © Xochi Solis

Xochi Solis, No chords are muted, 2015. Gouache, house paint, acrylic, acetate, colored paper and found images on museum board. Courtesy and © Xochi Solis

Xochi Solis, You’ve been looking too good to change your color now, 2015. Gouache, house paint, acrylic, spray paint, acetate, colored paper, naturally dyed paper, vinyl and found images; 75 x 58 in. Courtesy of the artist and the Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art. Photo: Richard A. Peterson, © Xochi Solis

Mi Tierra: Contemporary Artists Explore Place was organized by DAM and curated by Rebecca Hart, DAM’s new curator of modern and contemporary art.

Images courtesy Denver Art Museum.