Circle of Dance at National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution, New York, through Oct. 8, 2017

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Hunkpapa Lakota Northern Traditional Dance Regalia (United States). This Northern Traditional Dance regalia was made and worn by Robert Tiger, Jr. (Hunkpapa Lakota). Warriors in full ceremonial regalia decorate the front panels of the vest. The figures are Tiger’s ancestors, four brothers who fought in the Battle of the Little Big Horn: Chief Mad Bear, Low Thunder, Elk, and Walks with the Wind. Directly inherited from the regalia of the old warrior societies is the porcupine-head broach, a crest made of stiff porcupine guard hair with a layer of dyed deer hair in the center. Photo by Ernest Amoroso

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Mapuche Mütrüm Purun Regalia (Chile). Mapuche women wear traditional dress for ritual dances. The chamal or kepam is a square or rectangular cloth that is wrapped around the body and pinned over one shoulder, leaving the other shoulder bare if a blouse is not worn. With it is worn a trarihue, or belt, ikulla, black shawl, and a colorful apron. A silver breast ornament is always part of a Mapuche woman’s traditional attire, as are silver earrings and a silver headband. Her hair ribbons are rich in symbolism: blue ribbons represent the sky; yellow represent the sun; green represent the fertility of the land; and red represent power. Photo by Ernest Amoroso

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Quechua Danza de Tizeras (Scissor Dance) Regalia (Peru). Scissor dancers are noted for their brightly colored outfits. Their baggy trousers and fitted jackets are richly decorated with metallic embroidery, gold and silver fringe, and colored sequins and beads. Photo by Ernest Amoroso

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Yoreme Pajko’ora Dance Regalia (Mexico). Yoreme pajko’ora dancers wear a white blanket, or manta, wrapped around their waist and legs, and a long-sleeved white shirt. The white clothing represents purity. Pajko’ora dancers also wear long strings of pebble-filled Giant Silk Moth cocoons wrapped around their legs. The sound made by the leg rattles resembles that of a rattlesnake, which is associated with rain and fertility. Photo by Ernest Amoroso

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Cubeo Óyne (mourning or weeping ceremony) Dance Regalia (Amazon/Brazil). During the traditional Óyne, male dancers appeared wearing táwü, or knee-length bark masks. The masks were painted to represent forest spirits known as takahédekokü, which were seen only by Cubeo shamans. Photo by Ernest Amoroso

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Seminole Stomp Dance Regalia (United States). During the Green Corn Ceremony, Seminole men, women, and children wear their finest patchwork clothing, often newly created. Women’s (and girls’) traditional dress consists of a full, floor-length skirt and matching cape. Both are composed of contrasting colors of cloth and rickrack, and both include horizontal bands of patchwork. During Stomp Dances, women’s turtle-shell leg rattles provide rhythmic accompaniment to the men’s singing. Photo by Ernest Amoroso

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Tlingit Ku.éex’ Entrance Dance Regalia. National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution. Photo by Ernest Amoroso

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Yakama Girl’s Fancy Shawl Dance Regalia. National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution. Photo by Ernest Amoroso

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Yup´ik Quyana (Thank-You) Song Dance Regalia. National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution. Photo by Ernest Amoroso

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Hopi Butterfly Dance Regalia. National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution. Photo by Ernest Amoroso

Images courtesy National Museum of the American Indian