Scenes of New York City: The Elie and Sarah Hirschfeld Collection at New-York Historical Society, October 22, 2021 – February 27, 2022

“The New-York Historical Society presents Scenes of New York City: The Elie and Sarah Hirschfeld Collection, an exhibition of 130 paintings, works on paper in various media, and sculpture from an extraordinary promised gift by philanthropists and art collectors Elie and Sarah Hirschfeld. The exhibition features many artists new to New-York Historical’s collection, including Marc Chagall, David Hockney, Edward Hopper, Jacob Lawrence, Louise Nevelson, George O’Keeffe, Norman Rockwell, and Andy Warhol.

Curated by Wendy N.E. Ikemoto, curator of American art, with a catalogue edited and co-authored by Roberta J.M. Olson, curator of drawings emerita, the exhibition celebrates New York City: its buildings, bridges, parks, landmarks, and people. Many of the works on view feature New York City icons.” — New-York Historical Society

Keith Haring (1958–1990). Radiant Baby with AIDS Alligator, ca. 1984. Acrylic marker on enameled steel subway sign. Promised gift of Elie and Sarah Hirschfeld, Scenes of New York City © Keith Haring Foundation
Yvonne Jacquette (b. 1934). Movie Marquee II (Afternoon), 1972. Oil on canvas. Promised gift of Elie and Sarah Hirschfeld, Scenes of New York City. Courtesy of Yvonne Jacquette and DC Moore Gallery, New York
Marc Chagall (1887–1985). View of Central Park from the Window (Vue de la fenêtre sur Central Park), 1958. Pastel, colored pencils, and black crayon over graphite on Japanese paper. Promised gift of Elie and Sarah Hirschfeld, Scenes of New York City The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation / Art Resource, NY, © 2021 Artists Rights Society (ARS) New York / ADAGP, Paris
Georgia O’Keeffe (1887–1986). Study for “Brooklyn Bridge”, 1949. Charcoal and black and white chalk on paper. Promised gift of Elie and Sarah Hirschfeld, Scenes of New York City © 2021 Georgia O’Keeffe Museum / Artists Rights Society (ARS) New York
Jacob Lawrence (1917–2000). Harlem Diner, 1938. Water-pressed tempera on paper, laid on board. Promised gift of Elie and Sarah Hirschfeld, Scenes of New York City © 2021 Jacob and Gwendolyn Knight Lawrence Foundation, Seattle / Artists Rights Society (ARS) New York
Mark Rothko (1903–1970). Untitled (The Subway), 1937. Oil on canvas. Promised gift of Elie and Sarah Hirschfeld, Scenes of New York City © 1998 Kate Rothko Prizel & Christopher Rothko / Artists Rights Society (ARS) New York
Everett Shinn (1873–1953). New York at Night, 1933. Pastel on paper. Promised gift of Elie and Sarah Hirschfeld, Scenes of New York City
Theresa Bernstein (1890–2002). The Lunch Counter at S. Klein’s in Union Square in the 1930s, ca. 1930–39. Watercolor on paper. Promised gift of Elie and Sarah Hirschfeld, Scenes of New York City
Reginald Marsh (1898–1954). Construction, Steel Workers, 1924. Oil on canvas. Promised gift of Elie and Sarah Hirschfeld, Scenes of New York City © 2021 Estate of Reginald Marsh / Art Students League, New York / Artists Rights Society (ARS) New York
Norman P. Rockwell (1894–1978). Gramercy Park, ca. 1918. Oil on canvas. Promised gift of Elie and Sarah Hirschfeld, Scenes of New York City
Charles Burchfield (1882–1967). Backyards in New York, 1916. Watercolor, white gouache, and graphite on paper. Promised gift of Elie and Sarah Hirschfeld, Scenes of New York City. Reproduced with permission of the Charles E. Burchfield Foundation
William James Glackens (1870–1938). Early Spring, Washington Square, ca. 1910. Oil on canvas. Gift of the Elie and Sarah Hirschfeld Collection, Scenes of New York City, 2020.35.2
Robert Henri (1865–1929). Snow in Central Park, 1902. Oil on canvas. Gift of the Elie and Sarah Hirschfeld Collection, Scenes of New York City, 2020.35. 3

“Our gratitude to Elie and Sarah Hirschfeld for the generous gift of their collection is profound,” said Dr. Louise Mirrer, president and CEO of New-York Historical. “With works depicting the city’s bustling harbor, local eateries, tranquil parks, and sleek skyscrapers, our visitors will have the opportunity to see New York City with new eyes and, we hope, new appreciation.”

“Seeing the collection on display like this is a unique thrill, and one that I’m delighted to share with my fellow New Yorkers,” said Elie Hirschfeld. “Sarah and I are so pleased that New-York Historical is now the repository for Scenes of New York City and that generations to come will be able to better understand their city through these works.”

Images courtesy New-York Historical Society.